Racism

By Noel Sheppard | August 25, 2013 | 12:30 PM EDT

"What's going on about voting rights is downright evil."

So said ABC's Cokie Roberts on Sunday's This Week (video follows with transcript and commentary):

By Noel Sheppard | August 24, 2013 | 5:26 PM EDT

You can’t swing a dead cat these days without hitting some prominent African-American claiming race relations have worsened since Barack Obama became president.

Count MSNBC political and legal analyst Michelle Bernard among them, for on PBS’s McLaughlin Group Friday, she said, “The country has become more race conscious in terms of color and in terms of ethnicity since he was elected” (video follows with transcript and commentary):

By Noel Sheppard | August 24, 2013 | 12:59 PM EDT

Syndicated columnist Pat Buchanan made a statement Friday guaranteed to make liberal media members' heads spin.

During a discussion about Affirmative Action on PBS's McLaughlin Group, Buchanan said, "Whites are the only group that you can discriminate against legally in America now" (video follows with transcript and commentary):

By Noel Sheppard | August 24, 2013 | 11:51 AM EDT

Stop the presses! Stop the presses!

A liberal media member actually said something negative about Al Sharpton.

Appearing on PBS’s Inside Washington, Bloomberg News’s Margaret Carlson said Friday, “We’ve gone from Martin Luther King to the Reverend Al Sharpton, and as a leader, as he is trying to be this weekend, it’s very dispiriting” (video follows with commentary):

By Tom Blumer | August 24, 2013 | 2:17 AM EDT

Note: This post contains graphic language and subject matter, and links to more of the same.

The UK Daily Mail has already reported that "The three boys alleged to have gunned down an Australian baseball player out for a run because they were 'bored' were influenced by an ultra-violent rapper." Specifically, "rather than being part of any gang, which had been suggested before, authorities believe the boys were just wannabes who were emulating the thuggish beliefs of their idols, with Chief Keef being prime suspect." The Chicago Sun-Times posted a similar story.

It turns out that Kenan Kinard, the unapprehended suspect in the murder of 89 year-old World War II veteran Delbert Belton in Spokane, Washington, whose full name, according to the Associated Press, is Kenan D. Adams-Kinard, also identifies himself (screen grab for future reference) as a fan of Chief Keef's "music" (I could not locate a Facebook page for Demetrius Glenn, the apprehended suspect). Who is Chief Keef, and what is he all about? That's after the jump, and it's not for the faint of heart.

By Ken Shepherd | August 22, 2013 | 5:42 PM EDT

Well, there goes John McWhorter's shot at being invited on MSNBC anytime soon, especially any program featuring Joy-Ann Reid.

"[I]t’s time for the media to stop proudly emblazoning the race of white cops who kill black boys while cagily describing black teens as, say, 'from the grittier part of town,' as has been the case regarding [Australian exchange student Christopher] Lane’s killers," the Columbia University professor argued in his August 22 Time.com piece, "Don't Ignore Race in Christopher Lane's Murder." "The media needs to be as honest with black people as we need to be with ourselves. No group gets ahead by turning away from its real problems," he concluded, having already noted how:

By Tom Blumer | August 22, 2013 | 2:09 AM EDT

Corrected from earlier | People who were wondering whether Jesse Jackson would ever respond to the killing of an Australian collegiate baseball player by three "bored" teens in Oklahoma, one of whom allegedly posted racist tweets, got their answer today. Jackson's early Wednesday morning tweet read as follows: "Praying for the family of Chris Lane. This senseless violence is frowned upon and the justice system must prevail."

A BBC report has police saying that "The boy who has talked to us said, 'we were bored and didn't have anything to do, so we decided to kill somebody.'" The related Associated Press report doesn't carry the direct quote, instead impersonally relaying that "Police say the two killed 22-year-old Christopher Lane on Friday to overcome boredom." The AP has not reported Jesse Jackson's passive-voice reaction at its national site, effectively covering for a statement which comes off as "Well, I'd better say something, so let's get it over with." Let's compare Jackson's reaction to what he wrote on July 15 in a Chicago Sun-Times column about the George Zimmerman-Trayvon Martin situation:

By Paul Bremmer | August 20, 2013 | 6:18 PM EDT

MSNBC anchor Alex Wagner and her band of left-wing panelists sneered at the legislative recall effort currently underway in Colorado on Tuesday’s NOW with Alex Wagner. Serial MSNBC contributor Joy Reid even went so far as to refer to the NRA, one of the groups behind the recall, as “Neo-Confederate.”

Wagner was slamming the NRA, which seemingly everyone at MSNBC loves to do, when Reid joined the conversation and introduced the racial element into the mix: “Yeah, it’s interesting. There is a sort of Neo-Confederate thread that runs through these sort of pro-gun movements and the NRA movement.”

By Matt Hadro | August 20, 2013 | 12:31 PM EDT

Lee Daniels, director and producer of the new film "The Butler," lashed out on Monday's Piers Morgan Live at Americans who are "angry that [Obama] is president" and who are "showing their true colors."

Host Piers Morgan teed him up, asking if "America is a more or less racist country since Barack Obama became president?" Daniels responded that "sadly I think so." Actor Lenny Kravitz had a more positive analysis but supported Daniels' assertion about many Americans.

By Brad Wilmouth | August 19, 2013 | 6:32 PM EDT

On Friday's PoliticsNation show, MSNBC host Al Sharpton reacted to FNC's Bill O'Reilly criticizing him the night before, as the FNC host had called out Sharpton for taking out of context his contention that some who receive food stamps are "parasites" who take advantage of the system, and divulged that he had made a donation to one of Sharpton's charities in the past.

After having tagged O'Reilly with "hypocrisy" in a plug before the segment, Sharpton brought up the donation from O'Reilly and declared:

By Brad Wilmouth | August 19, 2013 | 4:03 PM EDT

On Friday's PoliticsNation show, during a segment in which host Al Sharpton linked the Obama rodeo clown in Missouri to alleged GOP extremism, MSNBC contributor Joy Reid declared that "the people who were whooping it up at that rodeo clown show are going to be all" the GOP have "got left," and went on to predict that the party is "shrinking down to its most extreme elements."

After clips of from past GOP presidential debates, Reid responded:

By Tom Blumer | August 18, 2013 | 9:25 PM EDT

Politico's current front-page headline characterizes Detroit as "The Right's Perfect Piñata."

In the actual story, one expects at least a feeble attempt by writer Hadas Gold to come up with a tangible reason as to why Detroit doesn't deserve its status as an perfect-storm exemplar of the failures of liberalism, public-sector unions, a race-based political model the elites once praised, and corruption. Instead, the objections Gold cites are vague. Because of that, apparently contrary to the headline's apparent intent, we're left with a pretty strong compilation of valid criticisms relating to the Motor City's fall from riches to rags. Excerpted after the jump are primarily the pathetic attempts at leftist defense saved for the final story's three paragraphs (bolds and numbered tags are mine):