Racism

By Matt Hadro | July 25, 2013 | 1:46 PM EDT

When a CNN guest made an unsubstantiated claim that George Zimmerman called Trayvon Martin a racial slur, CNN's Erin Burnett wouldn't call her on it.

On the July 16 Erin Burnett OutFront, the 2008 Miss Black Massachusetts Safiya Songhai said, "So, I mean the idea that race played a role in the case – yes, it played a role in the case. He [Zimmerman] is on the tape saying "F-ing coons." Automatically it got racial." After she finished speaking, Burnett turned to fellow guest Stephanie Miller, without correcting Songhai's unsubstantiated accusation.

By Brad Wilmouth | July 24, 2013 | 3:24 PM EDT

On Tuesday's All In show, MSNBC's Chris Hayes attacked FNC's Bill O'Reilly for what he called a "super racist rant" because of a commentary the FNC host gave on Monday's The O'Reilly Factor about racial issues.

Hayes charged that such commentary from O'Reilly gives a "cheap, crack-like high" to FNC's "old, fearful white audience." Hayes:

By Cal Thomas | July 23, 2013 | 6:40 PM EDT

President Obama rarely misses an opportunity to insert himself into an issue. Last Friday, he appeared in the White House pressroom to comment on the George Zimmerman verdict. The president said he could have been Trayvon Martin. Not likely, given his private schooling and the way he was fast-tracked to success.

The president said the history of African-Americans partially explains the way many black people view the case. He spoke of blacks hearing car doors lock as they cross the street and of white women who clutch their purses tightly when a black person enters an elevator.

By Brad Wilmouth | July 23, 2013 | 6:13 PM EDT

Appearing on Monday's The Last Word, MSNBC contributor Goldie Taylor called Rush Limbaugh "dangerous," and accused him of "pimping his audience" in response to the conservative talk radio host's reaction to President Obama's statement on the George Zimmerman verdict. After a clip of Limbaugh, Taylor responded:

By Matthew Sheffield | July 23, 2013 | 2:28 PM EDT

On his program last night, Fox News Channel host Bill O'Reilly applauded President Obama for speaking out about the George Zimmerman verdict but argued that Obama, and the self-proclaimed civil rights leadership have been avoiding the larger issues facing black Americans.

Instead of just focusing on how people felt about Zimmerman shooting Trayvon Martin, O'Reilly urged Obama to talk about illegitimacy, drugs, and how the violent "gangsta" culture encourages young black men to committ crimes.

By Randy Hall | July 23, 2013 | 9:19 AM EDT

During his famous “I Have a Dream” speech on Aug. 28, 1963, Martin Luther King Jr. declared that he wanted people to “live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.”

Almost 50 years later, that dream is still a long way off, judging from the clash on Saturday in which CNN Newsroom's black host Don Lemon told conservative white guest Ben Ferguson that because he doesn't “live as a black man,” he can't understand what people of that race are experiencing. Doesn't that also mean that non-conservatives cannot fully understand and be fair to conservatives? Read on for more.

By Jack Coleman | July 22, 2013 | 7:20 PM EDT

What a surprise -- one of President Obama's biggest critics from way over on the left is also no big fan of his administration's main apologists in media, MSNBC.

Author, activist and Princeton professor Cornel West let loose with some pointed criticism of the cable network on his weekend radio show with Tavis Smiley. (Audio after the jump).

By Matt Hadro | July 22, 2013 | 6:13 PM EDT

CNN anchor Don Lemon lectured conservative radio host Ben Ferguson for being quick to pan President Obama's Friday address on race, during Saturday's 4 p.m. ET hour of Newsroom.

Lemon -- who has played the race card by twice comparing traditional marriage supporters to segregationists -- told Ferguson that since he's white, he has a "place of privilege" that minorities don't have and therefore can't fully understand the plight of black people in America.

By Brad Wilmouth | July 22, 2013 | 6:00 PM EDT

As MSNBC's Melissa Harris-Perry made multiple appearances on Friday's MSNBC evening shows to discuss President Obama's surprise statement on the George Zimmerman acquittal, the MSNBC host declared that, after Obama became President, "every move that he made became where he ended up carrying the burden of race," during her appearance on All in with Chris Hayes.

A couple of hours earlier, as she appeared on PoliticsNation, Harris-Perry drew a parallel to the views of former confederates in the 1870s and those in modern times who dismiss liberal preocupation with racial issues. Harris-Perry:

By David Limbaugh | July 22, 2013 | 5:54 PM EDT

It seems to me that almost every time President Obama talks publicly about race, he stirs things up rather than calms them down. Whether intentional or not, it's unfortunate — and damaging.

It's difficult to express opinions on race that don't conform to the politically correct narrative, because race baiters are always lying in wait to denounce as a bigot anyone who dissents from their assessment. Indeed, many leftists who call for a national dialogue on race routinely brand conservatives as racists — merely because they are conservative — even when they remain silent on racially sensitive issues.

By Matt Vespa | July 22, 2013 | 5:32 PM EDT

The July 19 broadcast of ABC’s “What Would You Do?” at first seemed to be devoid of any racial themes that usually plague the overly-contrived ABC "News" show.  Yet, they needed to insert a racial element to see if bystanders would stop a would-be thief in broad daylight. A man named Uvall is an actor playing your everyday American commuting to work.  He parks his car along the front of New York Panini in Huntington, New York.  His car has over $10,000 in valuables, which Kevin, another actor who happens to be a white guy will try to steal. He’s mostly successful.  Yet, he’s stopped by a naval officer -- a real person, not an actor -- and placed under a citizen’s arrest. Nevertheless, ABC had to play the race game to see if there’s more to Kevin’s success.

During the second go-around in this scenario, Gabriel replaces Kevin.  He’s another actor, and he happens to be black.  He’s caught every time, and also placed under citizen’s arrest.  Yet, is this racism, or more perceptive bystanders, the folks at ABC ask?

By Jeffrey Meyer | July 22, 2013 | 11:19 AM EDT

One would think that a lawyer like Joe Scarborough would refrain himself from making irresponsible statements surrounding the Trayvon Martin case. Unfortunately, it appears as though MSNBC’s pseudo-conservative is incapable of being reasonable, suggesting that in the wake of Trayvon Martin’s death, white potheads are fair game for murder.

Appearing on the July 22 Morning Joe, Scarborough ranted against what he called, “really racially intolerant comments that we've been hearing from across the political spectrum” which to most rational people would bring to mind Scarborough's colleague Al Sharpton. Instead, Scarborough was referring to Sean Hannity. [See video after jump. MP3 audio here.]