Racism

By Noel Sheppard | December 15, 2013 | 6:53 PM EST

Democratic strategist and former executive director of the Congressional Black Caucus Angela Rye picked the wrong panel Sunday to accuse the Tea Party of being "racial."

When he heard this during his appearance on MSNBC's Melissa Harris-Perry show, Republican strategist Ron Christie strongly objected saying, "Racial! I will not sit here and allow you to say that!” (video follows with transcribed highlights and commentary):

By Noel Sheppard | December 15, 2013 | 5:13 PM EST

My nomination for the dumbest comment of the week by a television host on a news channel goes to CNN's Brian Stelter.

While talking to Slate's Aisha Harris about the reaction to her article calling for Santa Claus to be a penguin, the new Reliable Sources host wondered if Megyn Kelly wouldn't have been so adamant about Santa being white if Fox News had more black viewers (video follows with transcript and commentary):

By Ann Coulter | December 11, 2013 | 7:08 PM EST

Whenever liberals are in a tight spot, they adopt the scorched-earth policy of argumentation. With no answer, they start demanding that you define words: What do you mean "liberal"? What do you mean "democracy"? What do you mean "patriotism"?

They retreat from argument, burning the English language as they go.

By Noel Sheppard | December 11, 2013 | 1:11 PM EST

Remember all those promises that racism would end if Barack Obama became president?

Perfectly demonstrating the absurdity was Slate culture blogger Aisha Harris Tuesday actually making the case that it's racist for Santa Claus to be an old white man, and that he should be replaced by a penguin:

By Noel Sheppard | December 6, 2013 | 4:09 PM EST

With the recent high profile dismissal of hosts Alec Baldwin and Martin Bashir, you would think MSNBC executives would have warned their on air employees to tone down the inflammatory rhetoric.

Apparently not, for on Now with Alex Wagner Friday, Chris Matthews actually said that South Africa's last apartheid era leader F.W. de Klerk was more of a patriot than Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) (video follows with transcript and commentary):

By Ann Coulter | December 5, 2013 | 6:16 PM EST

On a break from pretending to believe they live in a country bristling with violent white racists, the Non-Fox Media have been trying to debunk stories about the "Knockout Game," in which young black males approach random strangers and try to knock them out with one punch.

The left's leading line of defense against the Knockout Game is to argue that young black males have always been violent, so, hey, this is nothing new.

By Brad Wilmouth | December 3, 2013 | 6:49 PM EST

On Monday's PoliticsNation on MSNBC, host Al Sharpton and the Washington Post's Dana Milbank mocked the Republican National Committee for the wording of a tweet that the group sent out marking the anniversary of Civil Rights Movement icon Rosa Parks defying racist Jim Crow laws: "Today we remember Rosa Parks' bold stand and her role in ending racism."

Sharpton picked up on liberal entities interpreting the tweet to be suggesting that racism has already ended, and, without even noting that the RNC sent out a second tweet a few hours later to placate critics by changing the wording, Sharpton pounced as he teased the segment:

By Noel Sheppard | December 3, 2013 | 10:44 AM EST

As NewsBusters reported Sunday, liberal cartoonist Ted Rall was recently banned from the progressive website Daily Kos for publishing a comic strip with Barack Obama in it that was deemed to be racist.

On Monday, Rall spoke with Newsmax TV’s Steve Malzberg about the incident, and warned that if Hillary Clinton gets the Democratic nomination for president in 2016, “sexism will be the new racism” (video follows with transcript and commentary):

By Ken Shepherd | November 22, 2013 | 12:52 PM EST

In compliance with a new state law, Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia, is moving up the date for its nonpartisan elections from the month of November to July, when primary elections are held. Although such a move will synchronize the jurisdiction's non-partisan municipal election date with that of other counties in the Peach State, some Democrats are crying foul and playing the race card. Naturally, MSNBC is doing its part to join the chorus.

And so readers of the MSNBC.com website were greeted this morning with the teaser headline, "GOP revives Jim Crow tactic," which links to Zachary Roth's  November 22 article, "Georgia GOP dusts off Jim Crow tactic: Changing election date."

By Ken Shepherd | November 20, 2013 | 12:43 PM EST

Early this morning the state of Missouri sent convicted serial killer Joseph Paul Franklin to meet his Maker, executing the white supremacist who targeted Jews and blacks in a killing spree in the 1970s.

The Big Three networks -- ABC, CBS, and NBC -- all featured stories on the execution on their websites this morning, but curiously NBC's teaser headline at NBCNews.com was worded thusly: "Shooter of Larry Flynt executed after Supreme Court denies stay." Clicking that teaser headline brought readers to a story by Alastair Jamieson headlined, "White supremacist who killed blacks and Jews is put to death in Missouri."

By Brad Wilmouth | November 19, 2013 | 6:40 PM EST

Appearing as a guest on Monday's PoliticsNation on MSNBC, syndicated columnist Cynthia Tucker charged that Republicans "pandered" to "bigot" and "homophobes" in the 2004 presidential election, and later threw in the word "racists" as well, as she and host Al Sharpton responded to Wyoming Republican Senate candidate Liz Cheney's dispute with sister Mary over the same-sex marriage issue. Tucker began:

By Tom Blumer | November 19, 2013 | 9:52 AM EST

I don't want to go overboard here, but most of the print establishment press deserves a bit of grudging credit in the Arne Duncan "white suburban moms" controvery.

Most of them aren't characterizing the gutless attempt by Barack Obama's education secretary to back away from his spiteful, condescending, bigoted comment Friday as an apology — because it wasn't. In a Monday post at the Department of Educations's Homeroom blog (how courageous — not), Duncan only admitted that "I used some clumsy phrasing that I regret," and that "I singled out one group of parents when my aim was to say that we need to communicate better to all groups," while repeating many of the tired lies which have accompanied Common Core's imposition from its inception. There was no admission of wrongdoing, and nothing resembling an "I'm sorry." Predictably, Stephanie Simon at the Politico was among those who considered Duncan's dumbness an apology (links are in original; bolds are mine throughout this post):