By Clay Waters | October 12, 2015 | 10:51 AM EDT

New York Times reporter Jada Smith celebrated "Justice or Else," an ominously named protest marking the 20th anniversary of the "Million Man March," led by Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan, the preacher notorious for his anti-Semitic and paranoid ravings: "Echoing Calls for Justice Of Million Man March, But Widening Audience." This year's version latched on to the harder-edged tone of the Black Lives Matter social media movement. But you wouldn't learn anything about organizer Farrakhan from Smith's adulatory treatment. Just as the paper pulls in its claws while covering the incendiary race-baiter Al Sharpton, the paper is apparently too terrified of activist criticism to even state the basic facts about Farrakhan's conspiracy-mongering, including being a Truther who in March  blamed the Jews for 9-11.

By Brad Wilmouth | October 6, 2015 | 2:39 PM EDT

On Monday's All In on MSNBC, host Chris Hayes repeated the discredited claim that originated with a liberal blogger that House Majority Whip Steve Scalise spoke at a convention for the European-American Unity and Rights Organization -- founded by white supremacist David Duke -- in the congressman's home state of Louisiana in 2002.

By Tom Blumer | October 5, 2015 | 4:17 PM EDT

Poor Gary Legum at How dare supporters of the right to keep and bear arms as clearly defined in the Constitution's Second Amendment push back against the gun control movement's cynical exploitation of Thursday's Roseburg, Oregon massacre?

Legum is outraged that "The right tells us (again) to ignore the elephant in the room." He must mean the fact that the area in question at Umpqua Community College was a "posted" gun-free zone with only unarmed security guards, right? Of course not. Legum is upset over Americans' "irrational attachment ... to weaponry" — so upset that he descended into profanity and name-calling that would likely end his career forever if he were a right-wing commentator.

By Brad Wilmouth | September 24, 2015 | 12:57 AM EDT

Appearing as a guest on Wednesday's CNN Tonight, former New York Times columnist Frank Rich -- now of New York magazine -- accused GOP presidential candidate Dr. Ben Carson of receiving support from a "racist, bigoted part of the Republican base," in the aftermath of Dr. Carson's comments opposing the election of a Muslim President. A bit later, he even accused GOP candidate Mike Huckabee of "bigotry" against homosexuals.

By Clay Waters | September 23, 2015 | 9:35 PM EDT

Jason Horowitz, one of the New York Times more colorful reporters, gave Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker a gleeful finger upon his departure from the Republican presidential race, suggesting Walker has advanced his career on racist appeals in "Dismal Finish Is a Fitting Result, Old Foes Say." Horowitz wrote on Tuesday: "Old political adversaries of Mr. Walker greeted his dour denouement as a fitting result for a politician who they say began and furthered his career here with a divisive style, a penchant for turning out conservative supporters rather than working with opponents, and tacit racial appeals in one of the nation’s most segregated cities. But the irony is that Mr. Walker was eclipsed by candidates who have ignited the Republican base with more overtly nativist and, their critics argue, racist appeals." Those "racist appeals"? Actually tough-on-crime proposals targeted at victims of crime in Milwaukee.

By Clay Waters | September 10, 2015 | 10:05 AM EDT

New York Times arts reporter Jennifer Schuessler wrote about an odd controversy in the poetry world -- a white poet, discouraged by multiple rejections, found success when he submitted under a Chinese-sounding pseudonym, even gaining a place in a "Best American Poetry" anthology and causing embarrassment to the editor and rancor among other poets for his "reactionary" use of "yellowface." Schuessler's account assumed the inherent righteousness of the angry liberal, multi-cultural position of hostility toward poet Michael Derrick Hudson.

By Tom Blumer | September 10, 2015 | 1:16 AM EDT

The folks at the New York Times must believe not only that their reporters are entitled to inject their opinions into hard-news stories, but that they can also inject their own "facts." Oh, and they can change those facts at will over time to fit the circumstances.

Sheryl Gay Stolberg's Wednesday story about the city's $6.4 million settlement with the family of Freddie Gray appearing in Thursday's print edition is a perfect case in point. Stolberg recast events following Gray's death to claim that there was only one night of rioting, when there were clearly two — even though contemporaneous coverage at the Times itself identified two separate nights of riots.

By Tom Johnson | September 9, 2015 | 9:56 PM EDT

Donald Trump has been likened to (among others) Ronald Reagan, Richard Nixon, George Wallace, Morton Downey Jr., and Nickelback, the band. “Nickelback” is also a football term, which brings us to yet another Trump comparison: Dave Zirin believes that the Washington Redskins franchise “is becoming the sports equivalent of the Donald Trump presidential run, a dead-ender operation with nothing to offer but a howl of anger at a slowly evolving world.”

As you probably surmised, Zirin thinks Redskins owner Dan Snyder should dump the team’s “Jim Crow era moniker,” but acknowledged in a Wednesday post that “Snyder clings even more tightly to the name, molding a new constituency of newfound ‘fans’ who want the team to be a symbol of the fight against ‘political correctness’…Now this billion-dollar brand stands disgracefully alongside Donald Trump, Sarah Palin, and everyone attempting to turn a carnival barker’s buck on white anxiety.

By Clay Waters | September 7, 2015 | 9:47 PM EDT

New York Times editorial page editor Andrew Rosenthal appeared on a podcast and insulted every Republican candidate in nasty, personal terms, throwing around the words "idiot" and "xenophobic" and insulting Justice Clarence Thomas in a racially loaded fashion. Rosenthal then accused the 1988 George H.W. Bush using the Pledge of Allegiance as an issue "deliberately and specifically intended to remind Americans that Michael Dukakis was of Greek descent and therefore suspect."

By Tom Johnson | September 6, 2015 | 2:40 PM EDT

Does Donald Trump’s popularity among Republicans indicate that a big part of the GOP base is more authoritarian than it is conservative? Yes, suggested Daily Kos founder and publisher Markos Moulitsas in a Friday post.

“The crazies don't really care about any conservative platform, they just want someone to reflect their own bigotries and xenophobia, all the while telling the weenies to fuck off,” wrote Kos. “They'd be just as excited if it was Hulk Hogan playing the role.” He remarked that Trump has a flair for “the kind of braggadocio that appeals to the conservative lizard brain” and concluded, “Remember how hot Vladmir Putin made conservatives? Donald Trump is the GOP's homegrown Vladimir Putin.”

By Matthew Balan | September 2, 2015 | 7:23 PM EDT

CNN's Brian Todd zeroed in on the "horrifying recent pattern" of criminals murdering police officers during a report on Wednesday's Situation Room. Todd noted that "seven law enforcement officers [were] shot to death in a month – 24 officers shot and killed so far this year across America,"and reported that "the string of killings of officers in recent weeks...has really got the law enforcement community on edge." He also pointed out that "police advocates say a saturation of media coverage has contributed to the spike."

By Matthew Balan | September 2, 2015 | 1:19 PM EDT

On Tuesday's CNN Tonight, Don Lemon wondered if some of Donald Trump's rhetoric had thinly-veiled bigotry in it. Trump indicated that the high turnout at his recent campaign rallies was "a great tribute to what we're all saying. We want to make our country great again." Lemon misquoted his guest in his follow-up question: "You was a tribute to people wanting to take their country back – because I know you've heard the criticism...people out there saying it is a dog whistle...there's some sort of racist intent behind it. Can you please respond to that?"