CBS's Nancy Giles Claims UCLA Student Mocking Asians Was 'Straight Out of the Rush Limbaugh Playbook'

On CBS's Sunday Morning, left-wing commentator Nancy Giles managed to attack Rush Limbaugh while condemning a UCLA student's internet video rant against Asians: "Her monologue was straight out of the Rush Limbaugh playbook from a few months ago....And Rush is a cartoon. In my humble opinion."

A clip was played of Limbaugh mocking Chinese President Hu Jintao after a joint press conference held with President Obama in January. Giles could have just as easily said that UCLA student Alexandra Wallace was taking a page out of the Rosie O'Donnell playbook.

Concluding her commentary, Giles called for greater civility: "Freedom of speech doesn't mean you have to say the first nasty thing that comes out of your mouth or threaten someone you don't agree with or call them names. Freedom of speech is why I have this job. And I try to choose my words carefully. And if not that, there's always the old saying that if you don't have something good to say, don't say anything. I'm just saying."

Perhaps Giles should take her own advice, given her long history of offensive and threatening comments towards those she disagrees with:

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Here is a full transcript of Giles' March 27 commentary:

10:09AM ET

NANCY GILES: In case you haven't heard, there was a recent video posted on YouTube by a UCLA student with some issues.

ALEXANDRA WALLACE: The problem is these hordes of Asian people.

GILES: And that video went viral and it's now been viewed millions of times.
                        
WALLACE: In America, we do not talk on our cell phones in the library.

GILES: Now when I first saw it, it looked like something from Funny or Die, the comedy video website. I mean, she was too much of a stereotype. Blonde valley girl student, push-up bra, vapid speech patterns, blissfully self-involved and blind to anything around her.

WALLACE [IN MOCK ASIAN LANGUAGE]: Ching chong, ling long, ting tong.

Of course she'd be mocking all the Asians at UCLA. Her monologue was straight out of the Rush Limbaugh playbook from a few months ago.

RUSH LIMBAUGH [MOCKING CHINESE PRESIDENT HU]: Ching cha!

WALLACE: And Rush is a cartoon. In my humble opinion. But she was a real student. And her name is Alexandra Wallace and the mind boggles. Years ago, a student told me that UCLA really stood for United Caucasians Lost Among Asians. Funny, right? And telling.

So, maybe Miss Wallace was feeling surrounded and scared and she didn't like it. But why post a video? Why not confession? Or therapy? Or medication? But in the age of YouTube and Facebook, millions of people want millions of other people to know what's on your mind. And what used to be a snarky note sent in confidence has now morphed into ready and willing public meanness or a not-so-funny tweet.

Of course, free speech is one of our country's fundamental rights, and a big part of what makes the United States great. And levity, irony, even sarcasm can be powerful tools to deal with some of life`s darkest moments. And, hey, I get Miss Wallace's whining about college kids whose parents wait on them hand and foot.

WALLACE: Everybody that they know that they've brought along from Asia with them comes here on the weekend to do their laundry, buy their groceries.

GILES: In college, I had to do my own laundry. Who wouldn't want someone to do their laundry? Now, I might be old school but I think Japan's terrible time is a lot more than a nuisance of emergency calls in the library.

WALLACE: I swear they're going through their whole families, just checking on everybody from the tsunami thing. I mean I know, okay, that sounds horrible.

GILES: And maybe Miss Wallace was just kidding around. But where's the joke in Japan right now? Is it the knee-slapping destruction? The belly laughable loss of life?

Freedom of speech doesn't mean you have to say the first nasty thing that comes out of your mouth or threaten someone you don't agree with or call them names. Freedom of speech is why I have this job. And I try to choose my words carefully. And if not that, there's always the old saying that if you don't have something good to say, don't say anything. I'm just saying.

— Kyle Drennen is a news analyst at the Media Research Center. You can follow him on Twitter here.

Kyle Drennen
Kyle Drennen
Kyle Drennen is a News Analyst for MRC