Racism

By Tom Blumer | April 27, 2015 | 2:27 PM EDT

At Instapundit, Elizabeth Price Foley caught a real doozy of a column in the Cincinnati area's only daily newspaper — if you insist on calling something which looks like it was cobbled together overnight at Fedex-Kinko's a "newspaper."

If there was a daily prize for the largest quantity of subtle but arrogant condescension in an opinion column, Cincinnati native, Ohio State graduate, and current North Charleston, South Carolina middle school teacher Meg Stentz would be yesterday's hands-down winner. Proving that she's keeping up with the latest trends in political correctness, she even dragged one of the left's favorite new words into her Sunday writeup.

By Curtis Houck | April 22, 2015 | 7:08 AM EDT

In an April 16 article for the website Black America Web, CNN Tonight host Don Lemon wondered whether possible Republican presidential candidate Mike Huckabee and declared GOP candidates Rand Paul and Marco Rubio are “black enough” to win over African-American voters but declined to ask the same question of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.

By Ken Shepherd | April 15, 2015 | 8:23 PM EDT

MSNBC host Chris Matthews loves to slander Republicans as often speaking in code or blowing racial "dog-whistles." Of course, doing that could open him up to charges of the same when he speaks carelessly.

By Tom Blumer | April 2, 2015 | 10:41 PM EDT

Update, April 3: The Indiana man who claims to have been hacked now admits that he wasn't, but says he was "joking" about robbing Memories Pizza, and is threatening to sue those who exposed his (ahem) public comments. 

Those of us following the Memories Pizza story won't have trouble remembering it as the years go by, thanks only partially to the Walkerton, Indiana store's fairly unusual name for a pizzeria.

What will also easy to recall are the "memories" of the unhinged and threatening leftist behavior that accompanied its owner's simple statement that, if the request ever arose, they would have to turn down catering a same-sex "marriage" because participating in or supporting such a ceremony violates their firm Christian religious beliefs — and the press's attempts to cover up what their journalistic malfeasance unleashed.

By Tom Johnson | March 30, 2015 | 9:18 PM EDT

It’s fair to say most conservatives aren’t big fans of Jon Stewart, but according to TV critic Sonia Saraiya, Trevor Noah, Stewart’s successor as host of The Daily Show, is in for an even nastier response from the right, much of it having to do with his skin color.

Apropos of Comedy Central’s Monday announcement that Noah, a biracial South African comedian, will take over for Stewart sometime this year, Saraiya remarked that “this country spent years embroiled in a debate over whether an American citizen who became the president was ‘really’ American; what are we going to do to Trevor Noah? Conservative critics have a practiced, doublespeaking method of piling on the heat on figures who stand out because of their race or gender or sexuality, while protesting that they are doing no such thing.”

By Kyle Drennen | March 30, 2015 | 4:53 PM EDT

On Monday, Comedy Central announced that South African comedian Trevor Noah would be replacing Jon Stewart as host of The Daily Show. To get a feel for Noah's brand of humor, one could simply watch his debut on the fake news show in December of 2014, when he jokingly declared that present-day America had worse race relations than Apartheid South Africa.

By Ken Shepherd | March 25, 2015 | 6:35 PM EDT

Georgetown professor Michael Eric Dyson, himself an ordained Baptist preacher, was critical of black legislators and clergy who surrounded disgraced frat boy Levi Pettit at a March 25 press conference in which he apologized for his now-infamous racist chant about lynched blacks.

By Jeffrey Meyer | March 24, 2015 | 9:42 AM EDT

On Monday's The Kelly File, Fox News’ Trace Gallagher highlighted an analysis from the Media Research Center which examined the number of times the "big three" (ABC, CBS, and NBC) networks promoted the "hands up, don't shoot" myth in the wake of the shooting death of Michael Brown by Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson. 

By Clay Waters | March 23, 2015 | 10:16 PM EDT

New York Times Public Editor Margaret Sullivan on Monday made a mea culpa for her past criticism of her paper's reporting on the racially-charged Ferguson case, when she called out a Times lead story for including the views of anonymous sources who supported police officer Darren Wilson's account of the shooting of Michael Brown -- a view eventually vindicated by the Obama Justice Department.

By Tom Blumer | March 22, 2015 | 10:45 PM EDT

Paging Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz. Your "conversation about race" idea has hit a bit of a brick wall among those you seem to believe are on your side — unless your idea of a "conversation" is talking down to anyone who doesn't buy into the idea of "diversity" uber alles, or that this country's founding and history have been predominantly noble.

On Melissa Harris-Perry's show this weekend, the host resoundingly approved when a guy who said that his mission in life is to "get white people to talk about whiteness" suggested that baristas at Starbucks should write “White supremacy has been the organizing principle of America since it was founded” on customers' coffee cups.

By Tom Blumer | March 21, 2015 | 11:49 PM EDT

The Associated Press's most recent story on the controversial Starbucks USA Today "Race Together" campaign came out Wednesday evening.

In that story, AP Food Industry Writer Candice Choi quoted Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz at his company's annual shareholders' meeting predicting that "Some in the media will criticize Starbucks for having a political agenda," but that "Our intentions are pure." Perhaps they are, but I suspect that certain materials company and USA Today have produced in connection with the campaign won't pass any readers' "pure intentions" test. Take USA Today's "How Much of What You Know About Race Is True?" test. Full contents follow the jump.

By Mark Finkelstein | March 21, 2015 | 11:54 AM EDT

Bracket busted? How about a nice Marxist critique of the NCAA tournament? Call it the theory of surplus value in high-tops . . . 

On Melissa Harris-Perry's MSNBC show today, David Zirin, sports guy at the far-left Nation mag, called the NCAA tournament nothing less than "the organized theft of black wealth."