Racism

By Mark Finkelstein | January 10, 2015 | 10:30 AM EST

"We think Texas was right to reject the Confederate plates, but that North Carolina should have issued the abortion rights plates.  How can this be?  Are we merely siding with liberals in both cases?  No."

Methinks the two professors who wrote those lines in a New York Times op-ed appearing today doth protest too much. Their column opines on a case before the Supreme Court deciding the circumstances under which states can refuse to issue vanity license plates.

By Jeffrey Meyer | January 8, 2015 | 10:12 AM EST

The NFL’s San Francisco 49ers moved out of famed Candlestick Park in 2014 after more than 40 years, leaving the stadium with no permanent tenant. As a result, the city of San Francisco announced that the stadium will be demolished but not without criticism from many in the community regarding the environmental impact of destroying a structure built with asbestos and lead paint. On Thursday, CBS This Morning highlighted the ongoing battle surrounding the stadium’s future and featured one San Francisco resident insisting that it would be racist to demolish Candlestick Park. Speaking to CBS reporter John Blackstone, Marlee-I Hand argued that “it's black matters, black lives matter situation. I think that environmental justice is something that they don't consider in poor black neighborhoods.” 

By Tom Blumer | January 6, 2015 | 10:23 PM EST

Let's imagine a white Congressman saying that when he served in Vietnam, he was never moved at the sight of a dead U.S. soldier unless he was white. His career would be over, and deservedly so, within about five minutes of his statement. If he was a conservative or a Republican, even if he resigned instantly and was roundly and unanimously condemned by his colleagues, the press would remind us of that racist statement for years on end.

Now switch races and change the war to Korea. Otherwise, 23-term New York Democratic Congressman Charles Rangel just did the same thing, and you can almost make book that the establishment press will ignore it:

By Matthew Balan | January 5, 2015 | 3:45 PM EST

Janet Murguia, president of the liberal National Council for La Raza, took credit for Lou Dobbs's departure from CNN during a Monday interview on C-SPAN's Q&A program, and repeated a six-year-old charge that the host directed "hate speech" against Hispanics and immigrants. Murguia claimed that Dobbs forwarded a "negative mindset – but more than anything else, a pejorative mindset" about Latinos using "terms that the ADL had said were hate speech terms."

By Tom Blumer | January 4, 2015 | 11:59 PM EST

In the final three paragraphs of a "Year in Review" item at the Los Angeles Times on December 31 (HT Patterico), reporter Matt Pearce joined the long list of journalists who have failed to properly characterize the evidence in Michael Brown's death in Ferguson, Missouri in August.

You had to know that distortions were coming based on the rest of the article content which preceded it. The most obvious giveaway was Pearce's description of Eric Garner's death on Staten Island. He wrote that Garner "died after an altercation with police; the officer accused of putting him in an unauthorized chokehold was not indicted." The officer involved was "accused" of the act, but he didn't commit it. In August, former NYPD detective Bo Deitl indicated that "it was a headlock, not a chokehold," and that the non-choking action was not the cause of Garner's death. Well, if Pearce couldn't get Garner right, it was a near certainty that he'd seriously botch his description of the Brown situation, which he proceeded to do (bolds are mine):

By Tom Johnson | January 4, 2015 | 6:01 PM EST

Ed Kilgore (at Talking Points Memo) and Mark Kleiman (at the Washington Monthly) agree that the Republican party has a serious racism problem but differ on what the GOP could or will do about it.

By Jeffrey Meyer | January 4, 2015 | 1:48 PM EST

On Sunday morning, former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich appeared on CBS’s Face the Nation to discuss a variety of topics including the ongoing controversy involving Congressman Steve Scalise (R-La.). During the conversation, moderator Bob Schieffer did his best to tie Scalise’s 2002 speech to the entire Republican brand. The CBS host suggested that “aren’t Republicans going to have to find some way to appeal to Hispanics and African Americans and what is that way because I think you would agree right now if you just look at it, it doesn't look like they're doing very much.”

By Tom Blumer | January 4, 2015 | 1:36 PM EST

In the interest of getting all supposedly relevant information out there for the public to see, the New York Times amassed an extraordinary array of journalistic resources — three reporters, three who "contributed reporting," and two others who "contributed research" — to what they must have thought was an important, underappreciated element of the saga which ended with the brutal ambush murders of NYPD Officers Rafael Ramos and Wenjian Liu in December.

The three reporters — Kim Barker, Mosi Secret and Richard Fausset — composed roughly 2,500 words as a result of that eight-person effort. Their resulting work was posted online on Friday and appeared on the front page of the paper's January 3 New York Region and National print editions (above the fold, top right). Their mission was to sympathetically portray cop-killer Ismaaiyl Brinsley, which was bad enough. But their ultimate objective, which I'm sure was achieved in the minds of many fever-swamp liberals (example here), was to convince readers that the link between Al Sharpton and his "we want dead cops" crowd and Brinsley's motivations was not all that direct, i.e., that "Brinsley’s short life and violent end is probably less political and more accidental than initially portrayed." The rest of us will find their attempt troubling, but utterly unpersuasive in that regard.

By Jeffrey Meyer | January 4, 2015 | 10:53 AM EST

On Sunday, freshman Congressman Lee Zeldin (R-N.Y.) appeared on Fox News Sunday with Chris Wallace and slammed the liberal media in the wake of the controversy surrounding Steve Scalise (R-La.) and his alleged speech at a white supremacist conference in 2002. Speaking to Wallace, Zeldin called out the “mainstream media who look for any opportunity to try to tear down Republicans to help back up the President of the United States and the Democrats in Congress.”

By Tom Blumer | January 3, 2015 | 12:13 AM EST

In the midst of properly blasting the New York Times for its disgraceful editorial attacking the NYPD, Fox Business News's Davd Asman has raised an important question which goes to the paper's fundamental integrity. Specifically, did the Times acquiesce to active efforts by Mayor Bill de Blasio's office encouraging them to go on the attack, effectively serving as his mouthpiece?

The question also occurred to me several days ago as I read DNAinfo.com's accounting of New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio's heavyhanded attempts to get local and even state Democratic politicians to condemn the police department. Excerpts from Asman's Friday column containing that question follow the jump (bolds are mine):

By Clay Waters | January 1, 2015 | 3:21 PM EST

On the heels of news that Republican majority whip Rep. Steve Scalise of Louisiana may have addressed a white nationalist group founded by David Duke, New York Times reporter Jeremy Alford did his best to smear today's Republican Party by linking it to the former Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan: "Much of David Duke’s ’91 Campaign Is Now in Louisiana Mainstream." Guilt by association is popular in the media when yoking fringe right-wing figures to the Republican Party, though Democrats never have to worry.

By Tom Blumer | December 31, 2014 | 2:04 PM EST

Let's say that a Republican or conservative governor or big-city mayor (yes, there actually are quite a few) was in a heated dispute with his state's or city's police union. Let's further say that this official decided that his or her best method for whipping up support was to order the staff to (ahem) "ask" GOP legislators or council members to issue public statements of support while bashing the cops. If such a campaign were exposed, that town's or state's press would appropriately be all over it. That public official would also get plenty of negative national attention, especially if he or she already had a bit of a national profile.

So let's see how far and wide — my prediction is "not very" — the following report from New York City online publication DNAinfo goes — especially at the New York Times, which has itself editorially attacked the police while indulging and ignoring the serious transgressions of "protesters" who have threatened them (HT Weasel Zippers; bolds are mine):