By Tom Blumer | July 30, 2016 | 1:34 PM EDT

Now we know why Nicolas Maduro, Venezuela's de facto dictator, recently handed over responsibility for food production to the military: He's going to need soldiers on farms and elsewhere in the food distribution chain to keep conscripted workers in line.

That's because on July 22, now over a week ago, Maduro's government decreed "... that any employee in Venezuela can be effectively made to work in the country’s fields as a way to fight the current food crisis." Those words are from a July 28 Amnesty International press release. Amnesty correctly contends that the move "is unlawful and effectively amounts to forced labour." Amnesty appears to have taken six days to respond because the first reports from the world's press did not appear until Thursday. As of shortly after 9 a.m. Eastern Time Saturday morning, the Associated Press, despite having at least four reporters in Venezuela, still hasn't covered Maduro's order. Neither has the New York Times.

By Seton Motley | July 18, 2016 | 9:40 AM EDT

It’s almost as if “Net Neutrality” is a Leftist safe word - to be uttered when the free market growing freely causes them too much discomfort.

Few things demonstrate the insular Media-Government Bubble better than this:

By Tom Blumer | July 16, 2016 | 2:38 PM EDT

The latest installment in leftist excuse-making when socialism fails goes into the "It would work if leaders just had the right people handling things" file. It comes in the form of a Friday morning "analysis" at the Associated Press. Writers Jorge Rueda and Joshua Goodman want readers to believe that the economy in the Bolivarian socialist and once fairly prosperous nation of Venezuela would be in much better shape today if the military didn't botch the responsibilities de facto dictator Nicolas Maduro had previously given it to handle the nation's "battle against widespread food shortages." Now the AP pair believe it will get even worse, because the military has essentially been given total control in this area.

By Tom Blumer | July 15, 2016 | 12:03 AM EDT

It would be far too kind to give three cheers to CNN for exposing the disastrous conditions in a children's hospital in Caracas, Venezuela caused by over 15 years of Bolivarian socialism in a July 13 broadcast report.

The network gets one hearty cheer for the detailed report's existence. It lost a chance for a second cheer when it failed to mention the country's socialist form of government which is directly responsible for these conditions. The third cheer went down the drain when one woman who was interviewed seemed to think that the healthcare system's desperate situation may just as likely be caused by the nation's utterly powerless opposition and not the Chavista government of Nicolas Maduro, where the blame totally and obviously lies.

By Tom Blumer | July 12, 2016 | 11:52 PM EDT

Tuesday's coverage at the Associated Press of the deepening humanitarian crisis in the Bolivarian socialist disaster known as Venezuela focused on the conditions in the ever-lengthening lines its citizens must endure in hopes of obtaining enough of the basics of everyday life just to survive.

Wire service reports often start off relatively brief and expand as reporters gather more information. That didn't happen with the AP's three Tuesday reports. Instead, Hannah Dreier's opening 11:51 a.m. Eastern Time dispatch was lengthy, with many compelling emotional and economic details. The second version of her report over an hour later was almost cut in half, and lost most of its power as a result. A final unbylined story at 3:39 p.m. — the one which most of AP's subscribers appear to have decided to carry — contained only 10 paragraphs, and even failed to note that the country whose people are now spending an average of 35 hours a week in line, and where 90 percent are saying they "can't buy enough to eat," is socialist.

By Brad Wilmouth | June 25, 2016 | 3:38 PM EDT

Concluding his Real Time show on Friday, HBO comedian Bill Maher called on President Barack Obama to go on an "apology tour" around the world to "drive Republicans nuts" and, presumably if Donald Trump loses the presidential election, to send a message that America is "back on our meds." On one of his most anti-America rants, Maher asserted that America "did some bad s***" in its history and has "acted like a nasty drunk" toward other countries. Maher listed Iraq among the list of countries the U.S. should apologize to as he called it "our eternal drunken booty call" which the U.S. invaded because "We were pretty badly hooked on oil at the time, and it made us do some crazy things."

By Elliot Polsky | June 21, 2016 | 9:42 AM EDT

Alexandros Orphanides’s June 19 anti-imperialist tirade on The Huffington Post has as much jargon as a chemistry textbook, but fewer defensible arguments than the National Inquirer. According to Orphanides, the immigration problem facing us today isn’t the influx of illegal immigrants into the U.S. in 2016, but the illegal immigrants that infested North America in 1607.

By Tom Blumer | June 18, 2016 | 2:14 PM EDT

On May 1, the Washington Post's Jackson Diehl warned: "We ignore Venezuela’s imminent implosion at our peril," noting that the South American nation of 30 million "has descended into a dystopia where food, medicine, water and electric power are critically scarce." Given the dire humanitarian crisis which has enveloped that country, broadcast media coverage during the ensuing seven weeks, particularly on the Big Three networks, has been sparse to non-existent.

Yesterday, as Major League Baseball's Los Angeles Dodgers faced the Milwaukee Brewers in LA, legendary Hall of Fame broadcaster Vin Scully, in a 20-second monologue between pitches, did more to substantively educate his audience about the tragic reality in Venezuela than most of the U.S. press has done in months (HT Twitchy):

By Tom Johnson | June 15, 2016 | 8:57 PM EDT

While America’s longest-lasting ideological adversary of the 20th century, Communism, was obviously leftist, most observers find the new main enemy, jihadism, much harder to place on the usual left-right spectrum. Not Joshua Holland, though. In a Wednesday article pegged to last weekend’s mass murder at a gay-oriented nightclub in Orlando, Holland declared that “Islamic terrorism is right-wing terrorism…All conservative religious traditions…want to return to an idealized vision of an earlier, simpler time. When you get down to brass tacks, they’re all right-wingers.”

Holland congratulated himself and his fellow lefties for “reject[ing] the religious supremacy, hostility toward LGBT people, and insistence on traditional gender norms that’s embraced by virtually all conservative people of faith, whether they express it with violence or discrimination or strange laws governing where people pee.”

By Brent Baker | June 8, 2016 | 7:48 PM EDT

FX’s The Americans, the under-watched but very compelling drama about husband and wife undercover KGB spies in suburban Washington, DC in the early 1980s, concludes its fourth season tonight. This season the program showed a side of the Soviet Union rarely, if ever, seen on U.S. television: the method and speed in which the Soviets killed those who helped the U.S. and how Soviet technological incompetence almost led to a nuclear attack on America.

By Kristine Marsh | May 20, 2016 | 11:14 AM EDT

Add “Marxist extremist” “Islamic radical” and “murderer sympathizer” to the list of controversial people Google finds worthy of celebrating. The major tech company and search engine decided to use yesterday’s “doodle” to honor Yuri Kochiyama, a Japanese-American radical who converted to Islam and considered terrorists and cop-killers her heroes. Google’s post solidifies the company’s stance of promoting radical leftist icons and ideas while scorning mainstream and traditional American heroes and holidays.

By Sam Dorman | May 18, 2016 | 11:15 AM EDT

CNBC anchor Joe Kernen tore into the prospect of a socialist president, and knocked young people who he said had a warped view of Bernie Sanders. Kernen’s comments came in response to a report by political correspondent John Harwood on the democratic presidential race. In his report, Harwood featured a poll that had Sanders losing to Clinton by 14 percentage points.