Communism

By Jack Coleman | March 11, 2014 | 9:17 PM EDT

Rust never sleeps, Neil Young warned in an album of the same title back in 1979. And so it is with revisionism from the left, especially when it comes their failed utopia of yore, the Soviet Union.

For nearly 20 years after the unforgettable night in 1989 when a long-divided Berlin was finally reunited, American leftists bit their tongues about the Soviet Union, embarrassed by its abrupt collapse, revelations of its appalling monstrosities, and confirmation via the decoded Venona cables of a vast communist spy network in the US government as alleged by Senator Joseph McCarthy. (Audio after the jump)

By Jack Coleman | February 10, 2014 | 1:16 PM EST

(Update: a video initially included in this post was blocked immediately by the International Olympic Committee on "copyright grounds." An audio clip has been added.)

Gee, where would anyone ever get the impression that high-profile liberals working in American media have a deathless soft spot for Soviet Russia?

True, one does come away with that impression in only a specific, narrow circumstance -- whenever a liberal opens his or her mouth about the Soviet Union. Aside from that, hardly at all. (Audio after the jump)

By Matthew Sheffield | January 23, 2014 | 6:08 PM EST

It’s hard to imagine, but for many years, conservatives and Republicans were rather common in Hollywood. Exploring that history is worth doing not just because it is informative but also because it illustrates that there is no good reason that people on the Right could not have a bigger presence in that industry today.

Arizona State University professor Donald Critchlow has done an important service in this regard with his new book When Hollywood Was Right: How Movie Stars, Studio Moguls, and Big Business Remade American Politics. I had the pleasure recently of speaking with him about his work, the transcript of which follows this introduction.

By Tom Blumer | January 4, 2014 | 6:37 PM EST

It's hard to know what's more ridiculously entertaining when choosing between Jesse A. Myerson's "Five Economic Reforms Millennials Should Be Fighting For," the illogical screed in Rolling Stone which would lead to the enslavement of those about whom he claims to be concerned, or Myerson's tweets as the opprobrium has poured in.

Since Noel Sheppard at NewsBusters has handled Myerson's original work, I'll have fun with the tweets. And it will be a pleasure to turn around Saul Alinsky's Fifth Rule for Radicals ("Ridicule is man’s most potent weapon").

By Tom Blumer | January 2, 2014 | 11:08 PM EST

Nicholas D. Kristof (I've tended to call him "Nick" through the years) has made and implemented a momentous, course of civilization-altering decision effective 1/1/2014 (HT Twitchy): "If you look closely at my Times byline ... I’ve knocked out my middle initial for the new year."

Why oh why would Nick want to do that? "I think in the Internet age, the middle initial conveys a formality that is a bit of a barrier to our audience. It feels a bit ostentatious." I've got a clue for you, Nick, old buddy old pal: Your columns are much more than "a bit" ostentatious and pretentious. Unfortunately, the disappearance of your middle initial is not likely to change that. If ever anyone exemplified navel-gazing, knee-jerk, double-standard liberalism, it would be you. Accordingly, I suggest that you begin to use a more appropriate middle initial than the one you just dropped. My suggestion follows the jump.

By Tom Blumer | December 30, 2013 | 8:03 PM EST

The fascination with and excuse-making for long-gone communist dictators responsible for the murders of millions during their reigns is a long-standing phenomenon.

Both CNBC and the New York Times continued that hoary tradition last week. Each headlined reports on the 120th anniversary of the birth of Mao Zedong (whose name was written as Mao Tse-Tung until about two decades ago) with "Happy Birthday, Chairman Mao!" headlines. CNBC's appears after the jump (HT Twitchy; bolds are mine throughout this post):

By Paul Bremmer | December 16, 2013 | 5:12 PM EST

Of the three major broadcast networks’ Saturday morning shows, CBS This Morning: Saturday gave the most background information on Colorado high school shooter Karl Pierson. To their credit, CBS reported on one particular Facebook post that gives us a window into Pierson’s ideological leanings.

Correspondent Barry Petersen mentioned it at the top of the second hour of the show:

By Tom Blumer | December 13, 2013 | 9:44 AM EST

Earlier this week, NBC Sports announced that "Moscow-based TV journalist Vladimir Posner (also frequently spelled "Pozner") will be a correspondent for NBC Olympics’ late-night show with Bob Costas during the Sochi Games."

To call Posner's background "problematic" is like saying that Bob Filner, former Democratic Mayor of San Diego, has a bit of a problem with how he treats members of the opposite sex. Posner is an old hand at defending and dissembling the worst excesses of the Soviet Union, including but not limited to the following exchange from 1980 cited by Lisa de Moraes at Deadline.com on Wednesday (bolds are mine throughout this post):

By Brad Wilmouth | December 9, 2013 | 5:38 PM EST

On the Friday, December 6, All In with Chris Hayes show on MSNBC, during a discussion of Nelson Mandela's support for violent resistance, the Daily Beast's Michael Moynihan admitted that the former South African leader had a "moral failing" because he "associated with" dictators who "did the same things to their people" as "was done to him."

Referring to an article by Moynihan on the subject, host Chris Hayes brought up the "Santa Clausification process" as he posed the question:

By Brad Wilmouth | December 9, 2013 | 2:11 PM EST

On Friday's PoliticsNation, MSNBC's Karen Finney accused Republicans of practicing their own form of "apartheid" by "separating people and dividing people" as she and host Al Sharpton discussed comments some right-leaning public figures have made in the aftermath of Nelson Mandela's passing.

Referring to former Senator Rick Santorum comparing Mandela fighting against the oppresssion of apartheid to conservatives fighting against ObamaCare, Finney asserted: [See video below.]

By Paul Bremmer | November 22, 2013 | 5:35 PM EST

President John F. Kennedy was assassinated 50 years ago by a Communist sympathizer, yet Friday’s Morning Joe on MSNBC ran a package that emphasized right-wing hate in Dallas while failing to mention Lee Harvey Oswald or his ideological leanings. The package, narrated by Brian Shactman, focused on the “unspoken speech” that President Kennedy was planning to give on the day he was shot.

Shactman just couldn’t help but mention those hateful right-wingers:

By Jack Coleman | September 5, 2013 | 4:45 PM EDT

Enough years have passed since the demise of the Soviet Union that the politics of one of its closest allies is forgotten when convenient.

Among those with selective memory is actor, filmmaker and outspoken liberal political activist John Cusack. When not appearing on either side of a camera, Cusack is a prolific tweeter as anyone following his Twitter feed is aware.