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By Tim Graham | January 15, 2012 | 10:19 PM EST

On Saturday, the NPR-distributed show On The Media recycled “The Story That Continues to Dog Romney" – a 1983 anecdote where Mitt Romney strapped his Irish setter Seamus to the top of his car in a carrier on a trip to Canada. Somehow, On The Media host Bob Garfield found it wry to compare Romney to Michael Vick, the NFL quarterback who pled guilty to hanging or drowning six to eight dogs.

“So back in 2007, you surely knew that this story would not be taken only at face value, that it would mutate" Garfield told Boston Globe reporter Neil Swidey, the original sleuth of “Seamusgate,” “and it would be used as ammunition by those who would portray Mitt Romney as the Michael Vick of presidential candidates. It still wound up as your lede. You feel any compunction about that at this stage?”

By Brad Wilmouth | January 15, 2012 | 9:55 PM EST

On the Monday, January 9, Imus in the Morning, as he was interviewed by phone, New York magazine's Frank Rich - formerly of the New York Times - argued that he believes President Obama should be reelected, and seemed befuddled when host Don Imus, who plans to vote for Mitt Romney, asserted that Obama's foreign policy has been "disastrous." The liberal columnist then tried to give President Obama credit for the death of Osama bin Laden.

After Imus asked, "So you like President Obama, don't you? I mean, you'll vote-"

Rich responded: (Video below)

By Noel Sheppard | January 15, 2012 | 9:44 PM EST

While introducing Madonna at Sunday’s Golden Globes, controversial host Ricky Gervais mocked her as being “just like a virgin.”

Madonna quickly struck back saying, “If I’m still just like a virgin, Ricky, then why don’t you come over here and do something about it? I haven’t kissed a girl in a few years – on TV” (video follows):

By Tom Blumer | January 15, 2012 | 8:50 PM EST

On Friday, two Deputy Secretaries, one at the Department of Transportation and the other at Defense, in their capacities as co-chairs of the National Space-Based Positioning, Navigation and Timing (PNT) Executive Committee, released a one page letter concluding that the modified broadband deployment plan of LightSquared could not coexist with current GPS devices and their spectrum. That's because: a) LightSquared's deployment "would cause harmful interference to many GPS receivers"; b) It would not be "compatible with several GPS-dependent aircraft safety-of-flight systems," and c) "there appear to be no practical solutions" to the problems.

Stories about the release, to the extent they exist, are largely avoiding the mention of "Falcone" (that's hedge fund operator and heavy Obama campaign contributor Philip Falcone, "SEC" (which is investigating Falcone and his hedge fund, and "Obama" (as in President Barack Obama, the beneficiary along with the "Democratic Party" -- another unmentioned term in any variation -- of said contributions). Coverage by Daniel Fisher at Forbes at least brings up Falcone, the SEC, and the Obama administration:

By Noel Sheppard | January 15, 2012 | 8:05 PM EST

It seems almost impossible to believe, but the upcoming issue of Newsweek has a cover story entitled "Why Are Obama's Critics So Dumb?"

If you think we're kidding, the following picture was tweeted by @Newsweek three hours ago:

By Noel Sheppard | January 15, 2012 | 5:59 PM EST

The lack of current events knowledge demonstrated by today's anchors and political commentators is often breathtaking.

On Sunday's Meet the Press, host David Gregory actually told Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.), "Democrats haven't put together a budget in a year." Actually, it's been almost three years (video follows with transcript and commentary):

By Brad Wilmouth | January 15, 2012 | 5:56 PM EST

As he appeared on Friday's The O'Reilly Factor, FNC's Geraldo Rivera complained that GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney never mentions that his father, George Romney, was born in Mexico while campaigning as the "most virulent anti-illegal immigration person ever," and ended up calling the former Massachusetts governor a "hypocrite." (Video below)

 

By Dave Pierre | January 15, 2012 | 4:15 PM EST

Years after President George W. Bush has left office, Chris Matthews still cannot resist taking a cheap and groundless shot at the former president. In his latest effort, Matthews has implied that the 43rd President did not write his own memoirs.

On this weekend's The Chris Matthews Show (Sun., 1/15/12), Matthews began his weekly "Tell Me Something I Don't Know Segment" by turning to one of the members on his panel, Michael Duffy, Time magazine's executive editor.

 

By Noel Sheppard | January 15, 2012 | 3:32 PM EST

ABC's George Stephanopoulos on Sunday proved once and for all what a joke he is.

Not only did the This Week host give twice the airtime to faux political candidate Stephen Colbert as Texas governor Rick Perry, he did so after the Comedy Central star called him "a political operative" (video follows with transcript and commentary):

By Scott Whitlock | January 15, 2012 | 2:53 PM EST

In Friday's Washington Times, media and political heavyweights such as Sean Hannity, Newt Gingrich, James Carville and others remembered the "magnetic personality" of Tony Blankley. The Times devoted four pages to honor its late editorial page editor (who passed away last weekend). Hannity enthused, "It is sad to lose him at such an integral time in our nation’s history, of which he was highly involved and influential. This country will miss him greatly. As will I."

The very liberal James Carville reminisced, "I’m sure that Tony was as partisan as the rest of us but he never resorted to the shouting (yes, I’m guilty as charged) that has become a staple of cable television."

By Tom Johnson | January 15, 2012 | 2:36 PM EST

Political rhetoric has grown harsher over the past few decades, but it almost always stops short of advocating violence or even fantasizing about doing physical harm. This past week, however, one Kossack declared that a certain Wisconsin GOP congressman deserves a few fists to the face because he backs Medicare reform. 

As usual, each headline is preceded by the blogger's name or pseudonym.

By Noel Sheppard | January 15, 2012 | 2:14 PM EST

CNN must have known that when it pitted Glenn Beck TV's Amy Holmes against the perilously liberal David Shuster of Al Gore's Current TV, sparks were going to fly.

On Sunday's Reliable Sources, when the media's coverage of Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney and Bain Capital surfaced, the pair did end up facing off with Holmes not surprisingly looking like the only adult in the room (video follows with transcribed highlights and commentary):

By Noel Sheppard | January 15, 2012 | 11:39 AM EST

Iraq’s former interim Prime Minister Ayad Allawi said Sunday that President Obama was wrong when he claimed the United States left Iraq as a stable and democratic country.

Appearing on CNN's Fareed Zakaria GPS, Allawi said, "It’s neither stable nor democratic, frankly speaking. The terrorists are hitting again very severely. Al Qaeda is fully operational now in Iraq" (video follows with transcribed highlights and commentary):

By Tom Blumer | January 15, 2012 | 9:52 AM EST

Yet another episode being reported from the totalitarian nightmare that is North Korea is getting short shrift in most of the world's press, namely "criticism sessions" (i.e., rat out your neighbor, coworker, etc.) identifying North Koreans who allegedly weren't sufficiently grief-stricken over the December death of Kim Jong Il (pictured at right), weren't sufficiently demonstrative about it, or didn't attend enough mourning events, as well as the punishments for such transgressions which have reportedly followed.

The source is the Daily NK, a South Korea-based web site described by AFP as "an Internet website run by opponents of North Korea." The opening paragraphs from Wednesday's Daily NK report read as follows (bolds are mine throughout this post):

By Noel Sheppard | January 15, 2012 | 9:14 AM EST

It wasn't only the press that completely misunderstood and therefore misrepresented Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney's claim this week that he likes being able to fire people.

NBC's Saturday Night Live actually began Saturday's show with a sketch depicting the former Massachusetts governor trying to fire everything - including the food! - at a South Carolina diner (video follows with transcribed highlights and commentary):