CNN's Cafferty Features Ex-Palin Aide's Rants About Former Governor, Doesn't Scrutinize His Motives

CNN's Jack Cafferty reverted back to his Palin derangement syndrome Wednesday afternoon. He touted two new books that heavily criticize Palin – labeling one as "required reading" for any potential supporters of a Palin presidential run – as an antidote of sorts to what he deemed "Palin propaganda."

Cafferty's question of the hour was "With the GOP field so weak, should Sarah Palin run for president?" He spent the majority of his brief time slot bashing Palin and assembling the case against the former governor. "Just when we thought that maybe she had decided to just go away and leave us alone comes news of Sarah Palin, the movie," he bemoaned.

[Click here for audio. Video below the break.]

 

 

The book Cafferty labeled "required reading" for Palin supporters was "The Lies of Sarah Palin: the Untold Story Behind Her Relentless Quest for Power," by investigative reporter Geoffery Dunn who received his PhD in Sociology from the University of California at Santa Cruz – a school with quite a liberal tradition.

"This book, which I have read, chronicles a lifelong pathology of deceit, and makes the claim – makes the point – that she's lied about almost everything her entire life,"  Cafferty boldly stated. By inserting "makes the point" over "makes the claim," Cafferty obviously believes Palin is a pathological liar.

The other book he recommended was "Blind Allegiance to Sarah Palin: A Memoir of Our Tumultuous Years," written by ex-Palin aide Frank Bailey, a tell-all memoir of his days on Palin's campaign for governor in 2006 and then for vice president in 2008.

While Bailey's memoir may be factually-correct, it could also be an embellished product of a disgruntled ex-aide with an axe to grind. Cafferty's peddling of the book as a credible alternative to "Palin propaganda" without noting that Bailey is currently under investigation by the state attorney general hints at how he truly feels about Palin -- and his feelings are well-documented.

In the wake of the Tuscon shootings, Cafferty hit Palin for her "inflammatory" response to criticism that she inspired the shootings. Last fall, Cafferty also revisited his malcontent with Palin by broadcasting his rant about her from two years prior.

Cafferty could have drawn information about Bailey from his Tuesday interview with CNN's Brooke Baldwin. Bailey was asked to respond to the Palins' accusations about him and Baldwin did mention that he was under investigation by the Alaska attorney general's office. However, the vast majority of the interview focused on his memoirs. He had plenty of air-time to dump his grievances on willing ears.

To be fair, CNN's "American Morning" Wednesday was balanced in its coverage of the dispute, having read part of the retort by the Palins just after playing a clip of Bailey from the afternoon before. However, the Tuesday afternoon Newsroom interview and Cafferty's Wednesday afternoon bit were much more slanted toward Palin's critics than the former governor and her family.

A transcript of the Cafferty segment, which aired on May 25 at 5:12 p.m. EDT, is as follows:

CAFFRTY: Just when we thought that maybe she had decided to just go away and leave us alone comes news of Sarah Palin, the movie. Next month, a secretly-produced, two-hour feature film all about the former Alaska governor will be released in Iowa, where the 2012 campaign kicks off with the Iowa caucuses in February.

This is a million dollar production put together by conservative filmmaker Stephen Bannon. He agreed to make the film after Palin and her staff asked him last November to produce a series of videos that would highlight her accomplishments as governor and re-establish her as a GOP maverick. It's probably a short movie. After its initial release in Iowa, the film will open in New Hampshire, the home of the first official primary. She'd better hope it's a blockbuster. According to the latest poll of New Hampshire primary voters, Mitt Romney outpolls Sarah Palin by a margin of more than 6 to 1 – 33 percent to 5.

Now if you're looking for something besides Palin propaganda, there are a couple of new books to read:

"Blind Allegiance to Sarah Palin: A Memoir of our Tumultuous Years," by ex-Palin aide Frank Bailey. It's based on thousands of e-mails that he kept while working for Palin during her run for governor in 2006 right up through her failed bid for vice president in 2008. He says Palin loves to play the victim and he calls her leadership style "chaotic.”

I would also strongly recommend "The Lies of Sarah Palin: The Untold Story Behind Her Relentless Quest for Power" by investigative reporter Geoffrey Dunn. This book, which I have read, chronicles a lifelong pathology of deceit, and makes the claim – makes the point – that she's lied about almost everything her entire life. There's also some juicy personal stuff in this book. The book is well-researched and it ought to be required reading for anyone considering supporting a presidential run by this woman.

Here’s the question: With the GOP field so weak – and it is – should Sarah Palin run for president?

Matt Hadro
Matt Hadro
Matt Hadro was a News Analyst for the Media Research Center's News Analysis Division from 2010 through early 2014