Don't Sit, Don't Sit So, Don't Sit So Close To Spitz

Someone call The Police . . .

What were the Parker Spitzer producers thinking?  If there was one guy you'd want to keep at a decent distance from a female co-host, it's Gov. Love Potion #9.  But tuning into the show, for the first time, tonight, I was shocked to see the way the pair had been virtually thrown into each other's laps.

A bit of inside TV baseball: I host a local TV show in my hometown. I'm always struck by how, when I'm sitting what feels quite close to a guest, we appear miles apart on camera.  So for Parker and Spitzer to appear so close on TV, they must literally be rubbing, well, elbows.

I can't say Parker looked particularly ill at ease with the set-up, though at times she appeared to lean away some.  But it certainly made me, and presumably a chunk of viewers, uncomfortable to see a guy with Spitzer's track record getting so up close and personal.

For the love of Pete, put Spitz behind Plexiglass!

PS: As long as I'm offering aesthetic criticism, I'd tell the producers to lose the jazzy intro music.  Between the music and the intimate seating arrangement, the show's opening brings to mind a couple at a hotel piano bar.

Excuse The Substance--but note how Parker, supposedly the show's "conservative," condescends to Christine O'Donnell as a "girl" who, while "cute and spunky," Parker wouldn't want running the country. 
Mark Finkelstein
Mark Finkelstein is a contributing editor for NewsBusters.