CBS: Obama’s ‘Fist Bump’ with Michelle ‘Is Generating A Lot of Buzz’

On Friday’s CBS "Early Show," co-host Maggie Rodriguez highlighted Barack Obama’s "fist bump" with his wife Michelle during his victory speech on Tuesday night: "A simple fist bump between Barack Obama and his wife Michelle the night that he secured the Democratic nomination is generating a lot of buzz." [audio available here]

Correspondent Priya David then reported: "It was a historic night for Barack and Michelle Obama, there was the hug, the kiss, and then this. You can call it a 'fist bump,' a 'fist pound,' a 'knuckle buckle,' a 'dep'..." However, David also acknowledged: "...but whichever phrase you use, some are using it to call Obama out" and quoted one woman who though it was Obama: "Trying to be a little too cool."

Then David moved on: "Others say it's a symbol of love." She quoted CBS political analyst Jeff Greenfield, among others, who said: "To me it was a kind of little light moment, maybe a moment of kind of intimacy. It certainly didn't reach the level of Al and Tipper Gore's record breaking kiss at the 2000 convention. And it is what it is. And you know, Sigmund Freud, the father of psychoanalysis, said sometimes a cigar is just a cigar. And sometimes a fist bump is just a fist bump." David then added: "It's not the first time Obama bumped with the younger generation. While bowling in Pennsylvania, this is how he congratulated an 8-year-old boy."

David went on to describe how much the ‘fist bump’ is ingrained in popular culture: "Commercials are cashing in on the cool factor of 'the bump.' And sports figures have used it for ages." She then observed: "But Obama showed you don't have to be an athlete to pull it off."

David again got reaction from Greenfield, who explained that only someone "young" like Obama could pull off such a gesture: "What it tells me is that these are relatively young people for politics. It's not something that Bob Dole would have done with Liddy Dole in 96'. It's not something Bill and Hillary Clinton do. They -- they're from a different time."

Greenfield also showed how pleased he was with the Obama bump on Wednesday’s show.

Here is the full transcript of the segment:

7:19AM TEASER:

HARRY SMITH: And when we come back, the story of this -- this gesture right here. Stay tuned.

7:23AM SEGMENT:

MAGGIE RODRIGUEZ: Alright everybody, give me a little pound pound. A simple fist bump between Barack Obama and his wife Michelle the night that he secured the Democratic nomination is generating a lot of buzz. CBS News correspondent Priya David has the story.

PRIYA DAVID: It was a historic night for Barack and Michelle Obama, there was the hug, the kiss, and then this. You can call it a 'fist bump,' a 'fist pound,' a 'knuckle buckle,' a 'dep,' but whichever phrase you use, some are using it to call Obama out.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Looks really weird to have like a presidential like -- and she's like so stylish.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN B: Trying to be a little too cool.

DAVID: Others say it's a symbol of love.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: I think that shows that, you know, they really are one team.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN B: Whatever they choose to do, that's up to them.

JEFF GREENFIELD: To me it was a kind of little light moment, maybe a moment of kind of intimacy. It certainly didn't reach the level of Al and Tipper Gore's record breaking kiss at the 2000 convention. And it is what it is. And you know, Sigmund Freud, the father of psychoanalysis, said sometimes a cigar is just a cigar. And sometimes a fist bump is just a fist bump.

DAVID: It's not the first time Obama bumped with the younger generation. While bowling in Pennsylvania, this is how he congratulated an 8-year-old boy.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Yo, Steve, fist bump is out, man.

DAVID: Commercials are cashing in on the cool factor of 'the bump.' And sports figures have used it for ages. But Obama showed you don't have to be an athlete to pull it off.

JODI R.R. SMITH: The handshake is going to be much more formal, much more business appropriate where as the fist bump is something that you use with somebody you already know and clearly already like.

DAVID: And like all politicians, every move of their life is analyzed.

GREENFIELD: What it tells me is that these are relatively young people for politics. It's not something that Bob Dole would have done with Liddy Dole in 96'. It's not something Bill and Hillary Clinton do. They -- they're from a different time.

DAVID: The Obamas have five months ahead until election day, in what's sure to be a bumpy road to the White House. And that bump is certainly giving a whole new meaning to the term political punch. One of the things we found people love most about the fist bump is since you're not actually shaking anyone's hand, it's much more sanitary.

RODRIGUEZ: There is that.

DAVID: Maggie, there you have it.

[Rodriguez and David fist bump]

RODRIGUEZ: Nice job.

DAVID: Thanks.

Kyle Drennen
Kyle Drennen
Kyle Drennen is a News Analyst for MRC