CBS’s Strassmann: ‘Mayhem and Misery are Back in Baghdad’

During a news brief at the top of the 7am hour on Friday’s CBS "Early Show," CBS Correspondent Mark Strassmann reported on a suicide bombing in Baghdad:

So these twin attacks are devastating here, and not just to the families of the killed and wounded. To many people here, this morning's a frightening reminder that Baghdad may feel safer but is still a long way from safe. Mayhem and misery are back in Baghdad after a pair of similar mid-morning attacks.

Strassmann later concluded his report by proclaiming:

The attacks are the deadliest here since last spring when thousands of U.S. troops began a security surge in Baghdad. The city grew much quieter and safer. But today, at least, the new Baghdad feels a lot like the old Baghdad. For today's attackers, this morning was perfect, a sunny Friday, the holy day here, lots of people out and about feeling confident. Apparently the attacks are back.

In a later segment, left wing editor of "The Nation," Katrina Vanden Heuvel, cited this report to Harry Smith, "Yeah, I mean, you have a surge that isn't working. Look at the piece you just did."

Here is a full transcript of the news brief:

7:01AM TEASER:

HARRY SMITH: But also, disturbing news this morning out of Baghdad. Two female suicide bombers have blown up popular marketplaces. Dozens were killed. We'll get more on that in just a second.

7:04AM SEGMENT:

RUSS MITCHELL: There is breaking news in central Baghdad today. Dual attacks by female suicide bombers. At least 64 people were killed, the deadliest attack on the capital since the U.S. troop surge. CBS News Correspondent Mark Strassmann is in Baghdad with more. Mark good morning.

MARK STRASSMANN: Good morning, Russ. So these twin attacks are devastating here, and not just to the families of the killed and wounded. To many people here, this morning's a frightening reminder that Baghdad may feel safer but is still a long way from safe. Mayhem and misery are back in Baghdad after a pair of similar mid-morning attacks. The Razzle Market, packed with hundreds of people buying and selling pets, was blown apart. A female suicide bomber killed at least 50 people and probably more. Many of the victims, teenage boys. But also suddenly shattered was a hard-won emerging sense of confidence here that this capital city was safe again, especially 20 minutes later. Another blast ripped through another pet bazaar. Again, the killer, a female suicide bomber. Iraqi police say 18 people were killed here, dozens more wounded. The attacks are the deadliest here since last spring when thousands of U.S. troops began a security surge in Baghdad. The city grew much quieter and safer. But today, at least, the new Baghdad feels a lot like the old Baghdad. For today's attackers, this morning was perfect, a sunny Friday, the holy day here, lots of people out and about feeling confident. Apparently the attacks are back. Russ?

MITCHELL: Mark Strassmann in Baghdad, thank you.

Kyle Drennen
Kyle Drennen
Kyle Drennen is a News Analyst for MRC