Bashir to Facebook Co-Founder: Go 'Play with the Traffic'

On Thursday’s edition of his eponymous program, MSNBC afternoon anchor Martin Bashir continued his shtick of using vile language to attack people with whom he disagrees, wishing a co-founder of the Facebook social network to go "play with the traffic."

Bashir's death wish on Eduardo Saverin came at the end of a segment in which he criticized conservative activist Grover Norquist. Norquist, an advocate of lower taxes and tax reform, had sharply criticized an "exit tax" bill authored by Democratic Senator Chuck Schumer (N.Y.)  The senator churned up the legislation as a left-wing populist response to Facebook co-founder Eduardo Saverin for renouncing his American citizenship to avoid burdensome U.S. taxes.  Saverin lives in Singapore and plans to live and conduct business there for the foreseeable future, his attorney has told the press. 

Norquist suggested that Schumer’s proposal was akin to one insituted by Nazi Germany during World War II, a measure that picked the pockets of Jewish refugees fleeing persecution in Germany.  Bashir rushed to the defense of Schumer, denouncing Norquist for comparing a Jewish senator's legislation to a law in place in Hitler's Third Reich. After that, Bashir turned his fire on Saverin, saying, “Enjoy your Singapore sling, and as they say in my country, go play with the traffic.”

This isn't the first time Bashir has made disgusting comments about conservatives. This is the same man who has said Mitt Romney is going to hell, has repeatedly called the GOP racist, and even compared Rick Santorum to mass murderer Joseph Stalin.

Rather than have an honest discussion about tax policy and how to create a tax code that finances the operation of the federal government but does so with tax rates that don't give incentive to the rich to decamp elsewhere, Bashir did what he apparently does best: demean and vilify his opponents and smear them with offensive and repulsive language.
 

Jeffrey Meyer
Jeffrey Meyer
Jeffrey Meyer is a News Analyst at the Media Research Center.