CNN’s Sanchez on the Concept of Freedom in Specter Aftermath: 'What the Hell Does That Mean?'

Leave it to CNN host Rick Sanchez to unintentionally give us a moment of comedy in an afternoon cable news broadcast.

On "CNN Newsroom" on April 28, Sanchez interviewed Sen. Jim DeMint, R-S.C., about the departure of Sen. Arlen Specter, Pa., from the Republican Party to the Democratic Party. He asked the senator from South Carolina if Specter was correct in his analysis that the conservative wing of the Republican Party was squeezing out a segment of the electorate.

"You're shrinking the electorate to an extreme - to a point where a regular Republican can't win," Sanchez said, paraphrasing Specter. "What do you make of that argument?"

However, DeMint explained it was which ideology was best suited to give Americans the freedom to choose in their daily lives that propagated a more prosperous society - both economically and culturally.

"That's quite the opposite," DeMint said. "We're seeing across the country right now that the biggest tent of all is the tent of freedom and what we need to do as Republicans is convince Americans that freedom can work in all areas of their life - for every American, whether it's education, or health care or creating jobs."

However, with that response, Sanchez had his Jim Mora moment - when Mora, the head coach of the Indianapolis Colts went into his "playoffs" rant after a 40-21 loss to the San Francisco 49ers on Nov. 25, 2001.

"What the hell does that mean?" Sanchez said. "I mean, the biggest tent is freedom? Freedom? I mean you got to do better than that!"

DeMint explained the concept in rudimentary terms for the CNN host - how freedom incorporated into certain segments of society allows it operate more efficiently, versus the big hand of government directing society.

"What it means is what has worked in America are free people, free markets for years," DeMint said. "And what we see now is a government expanding into all areas of our economy, increasing spending and debt at levels we never talked about. Americans who are normally not even political are coming out to tea parties and protesting. These aren't Republicans or Democrats. These are just concerned Americans."

DeMint pointed out that Specter's opponent, had he remained a Republican and ran in the Pennsylvania GOP primary, Pat Toomey understood this concept.

"I think what we've seen is both parties have pushed the envelope too far and now America is pushing back," DeMint continued. "I think you'll see this next election to be totally different. Pat Toomey who is running in Pennsylvania is one of the most mainstream Americans I know. He's for the simple concepts of limited government and more personal freedom, free markets and that's what works in our country today and that's what we need to stand up for as Republicans and I think as all Americans."