By Geoffrey Dickens | October 18, 2016 | 12:12 PM EDT

With just three weeks to go, major newspapers (with a circulation of at least 50,000) are walloping Donald Trump in their official endorsements, favoring Hillary Clinton by a count of 68 to zero. Out of a total of 82 newspapers that have offered an editorial on who their readers should vote for, 68 (83 percent) of them have endorsed Hillary Clinton, five (6 percent) recommended Libertarian Party candidate Gary Johnson, two (2 percent) advised to vote for anybody but Trump and seven (9 percent) newspapers offered no endorsement at all.

By Mark Finkelstein | February 5, 2016 | 8:19 AM EST

Then why the hell weren't those "top journalists" shouting it from the top of the evening news and in banner headlines? . . . On today's Morning Joe, Joe Scarborough said "as we were leaving Iowa, I heard from a lot of top journalists who whispered "you know Bernie won." I heard that time and time again. 'You know Bernie won.'"

With Scarborough asking "where is this, Bolivia in the 1930s?" and Steve Schmidt saying it was "shady as hell," the blame was laid at the feet of the Democrat party, which runs an intentionally murky process so it can control things. No doubt. But what about the responsibility of those "top journalists" to blow the whistle? Why did they "whisper" and speak "quietly?" How might this campaign be different if the day after Iowa the headline had been either "Bernie Wins" or "Debbie Wasserman Schultz Throws Iowa to Hillary?"

By Tom Blumer | January 25, 2016 | 2:29 PM EST

The Des Moines Register likely broke new ground when it endorsed Hillary Clinton for the Democratic presidential nomination on Saturday. The Register may be the first major newspaper to endorse a major-party presidential candidate under investigation by the FBI at the time of the endorsement.

The time stamp at the editorial's link is currently and inexplicably this morning, but pundits and bloggers have been commenting on it for two days, and Google News says the endorsement is from "2 days ago." This time disconnect seems fitting, as it reflects how disconnected from reality the Register's editorial board had to be on so many levels to make its endorsement. Let's look at just one of them, namely Mrs. Clinton's admitted use of a private email server to conduct government business when she was President Barack Obama's Secretary of State.

By Tom Blumer | December 28, 2015 | 8:08 PM EST

According to NewsBusters' own Blonde Gator, Hillary Clinton has, in the 8-1/2 months since she declared her candidacy, committed 51 gaffes and goofs. That's an average rate of six per month. Imagine how many there would be if Mrs. Clinton genuinely campaigned among the people instead of among preselected groupies.

One of her latest gaffes, which occurred last week at an elementary school in Iowa, was a humdinger. Predictably, the establishment press almost completely ignored it, while a couple of journalists who noticed the center-right's reaction tried and failed to excuse it.

By Mark Finkelstein | December 24, 2015 | 7:40 AM EST

About the last person you'd expect to have a Vulcan mind meld with Donald Trump is Chris Cuomo. But at a time when the focus is Star Wars, Cuomo went Star Trek today, sounding much like Trump in his description of Hillary Clinton. Trump of course made the phrase "low-energy" famous as he repeatedly battered Jeb Bush with it. Recently, Trump took a similar tack with Hillary, saying she lacked the "stamina" to be president, claiming that after brief, staged appearances, she disappears from the campaign trail to "sleep."  

On this morning's New Day, there was Cuomo saying that in her recent Des Moines Register interview, Hillary was "very low energy." Cuomo even echoed Trump's notion of Hillary disappearing from the trail, saying she's been "keeping a low profile as much as she can."

By Curtis Houck | November 14, 2015 | 10:53 PM EST

After being pushed by The Des Moines Register’s Kathie Obradovich during Saturday’s Democratic debate about his flip-flopping on Hillary Clinton’s e-mail scandal, socialist Bernie Sanders denied the idea that he had backtracked from his “damn e-mails” comment in the October 13 debate. Instead, Sanders attacked the notion as “media stuff” and emphasized that he’s “still sick and tired of Hillary Clinton's e-mails.”

By Brent Bozell | and By Tim Graham | February 7, 2015 | 7:12 AM EST

Mike Huckabee, the once and future presidential candidate, is somehow controversial for attacking Beyonce and her gangsta-rap husband Jay-Z in his new book God, Guns, Grits, and Gravy. Beyonce is one of the most popular singers in America, and Huckabee acknowledges that. But pollsters are distorting his book.

Conservative politicians aren’t really allowed to condemn the crudest excesses of popular culture. The Obamas can be best friends with Jay-Z and Beyonce and never face any scrutiny for their parenting, which is always presumed to be fantastic. 

By Tom Blumer | September 29, 2014 | 1:45 PM EDT

According to a poll which is described as the state's "gold standard," Republican U.S. Senate candidate Joni Ernst now leads Bruce Braley, her Democratic Party opponent, in the Iowa U.S. Senate race for the seat being vacated by Democrat Tom Harkin.

The Des Moines Register's "Iowa poll" has Ernst up by a six-point margin, 44% - 38%. That Ernst's lead isn't larger is apparently attributable to a statement she made to the Register's editorial board which has been treated as a misstep, but really wasn't. The truth is that the statement Ernst made — that she had "reason to believe there were weapons of mass destruction in Iraq" — really wasn't strong enough.

By Tom Blumer | March 28, 2013 | 8:40 PM EDT

Apparently the journalistic disease known as obsessive-compulsive interactive map publishing is spreading.

Late last year, Gannett's Journal News in White Plains, New York created a firestorm when it published an interactive map of gun permit holders in two counties north of New York City, obviously giving criminals, depending on how they target victims, the identity of places to rob to get guns or, by inference, people they could be comfortable wouldn't be carrying concealed weapons. On Wednesday evening, the Des Moines Register published an item still present on its site discussing the general degree of presence or absence of resource officers at Iowa schools. It also published a "handy" interactive map, since taken down, of which schools have resource officers, which ones don't, and which ones didn't respond to a survey on the topic. Excerpts from the report follow the jump (HT Newsmax via The Blaze):

By Tom Blumer | January 8, 2013 | 10:49 AM EST

The first rule for those who have dug themselves into rhetorical holes is: Stop digging. As noted yesterday (at NewsBusters; at BizzyBlog), Des Moines Register columnist Donald Kaul ignored that rule on January 5 by claiming that his December 30 column -- which, among other things, advocated "(tying) Mitch McConnell and John Boehner ... to the back of a Chevy pickup truck and drag(ging) them around a parking lot until they ... (see) the light on gun control" and having those who resist the efforts of those trying to pry their "guns from their cold, dead hands" should get their wish -- was "satire" comparable to the work Jonathan Swift.

The first rule for bystanders watching others digging themselves into such dangerous holes is: Take away their shovel. Instead, Register editor Rick Green joined in the digging in a Saturday column, even backing Kaul's ridiculous "satire" claim (bolds are mine):

By Tom Blumer | January 7, 2013 | 5:18 PM EST

On December 30, (originally noted at NewsBusters by MRC's Tim Graham), twice- or thrice-retired Des Moines Register columnist Donald Kaul, feeling compelled to come back and begin writing columns again, in the Register's words, "when events move him," made five immodest proposals: 1) "Repeal the Second Amendment"; 2) "Declare the NRA a terrorist organization and make membership illegal"; 3) "Make ownership of unlicensed assault rifles a felony"; 4) People resisting the confiscation efforts of those trying to pry their "guns from their cold, dead hands" should get their wish; 5) "tie Mitch McConnell and John Boehner ... to the back of a Chevy pickup truck and drag them around a parking lot until they ... (see) the light on gun control."

Following a firestorm of outrage, Kaul wrote a January 5 follow-up column claiming he was only engaging in satire, while arrogantly comparing himself to Jonathan Swift and the revered satirist's Modest Proposal. Really. Mr. Kaul seems to have missed something about how his supposedly satirical original column differs from Swift's work:

By Tom Blumer | January 7, 2013 | 9:35 AM EST

In a Washington Examiner column last night, Gregory Kane made several quite valid points in comparing the media firestorm over Rush Limbaugh's comments about Sarah Fluke to the virtual silence over Des Moines Register columnist Donald Kaul, who, if he were in charge, "would tie Mitch McConnell and John Boehner ... to the back of a Chevy pickup truck and drag them around a parking lot until they saw the light on gun control." Kaul also wrote that he would, "If some people refused to give up their guns," make "that 'prying the guns from their cold, dead hands' thing" operative.

Confirming what readers here would expect, a search at the Associated Press's national web site on Kaul's last name comes up empty. Key paragraphs from Kane's column follow the jump (HT Instapundit; bolds are mine):