CNN

By Jeffrey Meyer | November 26, 2014 | 8:18 AM EST

On Tuesday night, Cornell Brooks, president of the NAACP, appeared on CNN’s Erin Burnett OutFront to discuss the shooting death of Michael Brown and dismissed calls for violence by a member of Michael Brown’s immediate family as inciting violence. Burnett played video of Brown’s stepfather, Louis Head, telling a crowd of protestors to “burn this bi*** down” after the grand jury decided not to indict Officer Darren Wilson and asked Brooks if “that served as a call for violence?” Rather than condemn Brown’s stepfather’s highly charged rhetoric, the president of the NAACP proclaimed “I don't think that was a call for violence or it caused violence.” 

By Matthew Balan | November 25, 2014 | 7:00 PM EST

Two CNN anchors channeled the supporters of Michael Brown's family on Tuesday's Early Start, as they played up how St. Louis County, Missouri Prosecuting Attorney Robert McCulloch presented the Brown case to a grand jury, instead of pursuing charges himself. Chris Cuomo pointed out that "the prosecutor could still bring charges even after the grand jury." Deborah Feyerick later forwarded her colleague's point: "Could the prosecutor...basically, overrule the grand jury and say, charges should be filed?"

By Matthew Balan | November 25, 2014 | 3:50 PM EST

Rudy Giuliani fired back at Michael Eric Dyson on CNN's New Day on Tuesday for the MSNBC analyst's "white supremacy" attack on the former New York City mayor. When anchor Alisyn Camerota raised Giuliani's supposedly "controversial comments" from Sunday's Meet the Press on NBC, the former Republican politician underlined that he had "said the same thing the President of the United States said, and I was accused of being a racist."

By Matthew Balan | November 24, 2014 | 3:22 PM EST

CNN stood out on Sunday and Monday for actually covering the sex abuse charges against Terry Bean, a "major fundraiser for President Obama," as correspondent Erin McPike labeled him. The cable network devoted three full segments and two news briefs to the criminal charges against Bean, who is also the co-founder of the left-wing homosexual activist group Human Rights Campaign. As of Monday morning, the Big Three networks have yet to cover the story on their morning and evening newscasts.

By Tom Blumer | November 21, 2014 | 7:45 PM EST

At CNN on Thursday night, Anderson Cooper asked former White House Press Secretary Jay Carney, who is now a contributor at the network, to square President Barack Obama's Thursday night immigration announcement with past presidential statements that he didn't have the power to do what he had just done.

As seen in the video after the jump, Carney acknowledged his former boss's compete flip-flop (HT the Weekly Standard):

By Curtis Houck | November 21, 2014 | 12:52 AM EST

Following President Barack Obama’s speech announcing his executive order on illegal immigration, CNN political commentator and former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich unloaded on the President, likening his speech to statements made by ObamaCare architect Jonathan Gruber and that those in the “elite” class “really underestimate” the disdain Americans have for unfortified borders.

Responding on CNN in the minutes after it ended, Gingrich opined that it was wrong for the President to go against the incoming Congress as it had “repudiated his policies in the election” a few weeks ago. Gingrich then slammed what viewers just heard as “a Gruber speech” where the President was “simply not telling the country the truth.”

By Matthew Balan | November 20, 2014 | 5:44 PM EST

On Wednesday's AC360, CNN's Dana Bash was hesitant to address President Obama's past remarks on immigration reform, where he repeatedly denied that he couldn't act alone – to the point that she first touted the Democrat's supposed academic credentials. After host Anderson Cooper played five clips of Mr. Obama making this point, Bash replied that "we should also remind people that he's not just the President. He also...was a constitutional professor...so, he speaks...with academic knowledge.

By Jack Coleman | November 20, 2014 | 5:32 PM EST

Next time she's looking for work, Ashleigh Banfield might consider public relations for Hamas. Then again, she's already doing it.

In the wake of Tuesday's horrific attack by Palestinians against four men during morning prayer at a synagogue in Jerusalem, Banfield earnestly sought to find someway, anyway to explain how the massacre might be justified.

By Scott Whitlock | November 20, 2014 | 5:04 PM EST

Although many journalistic outlets have conducted a blackout of ObamaCare architect Jonathan Gruber's comments about duping "stupid" Americans, CNN's Jake Tapper has delivered consistent coverage and on CNN.com offered an elaborate explanation of what Gruber's impolitic comments really mean. 

By Matthew Balan | November 18, 2014 | 4:02 PM EST

On Monday's AC360 on CNN, retired Lt. General Russel Honore rebuked the media's coverage of the ongoing controversy surrounding the police shooting of Michael Brown. Anderson Cooper raised how a liberal legal analyst contended that Missouri Governor Jay Nixon's activation of the National Guard, in anticipation of a grand jury decision on the case, was an "escalation of this military-style approach that didn't work in the first place." He then asked, "Do you agree with that – that it could, in some ways, do more harm than – than good?"

By Rich Noyes | November 17, 2014 | 8:32 AM EST

Now online: the November 17 edition of Notable Quotables, MRC’s bi-weekly compilation of the latest outrageous quotes in the liberal media. This week, as voters dealt Democrats a stinging election defeat, liberal journalists insisted there was no mandate for conservatives. "I don't think this was a big, ideological election," NBC's Tom Brokaw pronounced, while CBS's Bob Schieffer agreed: "It really was a referendum on both parties."

By Tim Graham | November 14, 2014 | 7:33 PM EST

Kyle Drennen noted that EPA chief Gina McCarthy appeared on MSNBC on Thursday so Andrea Mitchell could ask how she was going to deal with "climate deniers" as Team Obama pushes for rigid limits on carbon emissions. At least Mitchell read a statement from GOP Sen. Jim Inhofe calling the Obama deal with China a "non-binding charade."

On Thursday morning's New Day on CNN, host Chris Cuomo opened with a wiffle ball, mocking Senator Inhofe's 2012 interview with a Christian radio station (acting like a DNC-Think Progress publicist).