Journalistic Issues

By Jorge Bonilla | November 18, 2014 | 3:51 PM EST

When asked about the ramifications of potential executive action on immigration, incoming Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) suggested such action by President Barack Obama would "poison the well". McConnell need no longer concern himself with that eventuality, given a recent tweet by Univision's Jorge Ramos.

By Tom Johnson | October 30, 2014 | 12:09 AM EDT

Steven Waldman, a former Newsweek reporter and Obama adviser to the FCC, concedes that liberal bias can have an effect, but says that overall it’s a “minor factor,” far less important than journalists’ interest in advancing their careers.

By Kyle Drennen | October 29, 2014 | 3:37 PM EDT

Appearing on Fox News's O'Reilly Factor Tuesday night, media analyst Bernard Goldberg praised reporter Sharyl Attkisson for calling out the liberal bias of her former employer, CBS News, in her upcoming book. He then lamented the difficultly in ending such bias: "But here's why the problem is not going to go away. Even if top management wants to eliminate this liberal bias, there are too many producers and reporters in important positions at all the networks who are liberal, and who let their liberalism affect their journalism."

By Tom Johnson | October 24, 2014 | 1:24 PM EDT

The Esquire blogger thinks the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation’s coverage of the Parliament shootings was excellent because the CBC is taxpayer-funded, unlike U.S. news networks, which have to pander to their audiences to keep those advertiser dollars coming in.

By Tom Johnson | October 22, 2014 | 1:43 PM EDT

The New Yorker editor and former Washington Post reporter contends that “the most overstated notion” about the late Washington Post executive editor Ben Bradlee “was the idea that he was an ideological man. This was a cartoon.”

He and Post publisher Katharine Graham, though often seen as ferociously committed liberals…were, in fact, committed to the First Amendment.”

By Jorge Bonilla | October 17, 2014 | 11:47 AM EDT

Univision continues its long, storied history of depicting border-security conservatives in an unfavorable light, regardless of the soundness of their proposals or the reasoning behind them. A most recent example is the coverage by Noticiero Univision of the debate between the candidates for an open congressional seat in Northern Virginia.

By Kyle Drennen | September 29, 2014 | 5:10 PM EDT

In an interview with Ben Affleck on Monday's NBC Today, co-host Matt Lauer observed that the actor's new murder mystery thriller Gone Girl was "a little hostile to the institution of the media." Affleck agreed but reassured Lauer: "Yeah, it's not media broadly. It's not you guys or The New York Times or even the news. It's about that stripe of media that's the sort of the cable, 24-hour, 'Who killed somebody today?,' you know, kind of hustle."

Affleck – who plays a husband suspected of murdering his wife amid a media frenzy in the film – listed various real-life murder cases the press became obsessed with: "...Scott Peterson or Laci Peterson or whatever, Amanda Knox, or that girl whose daughter died. You know, whatever horrible thing happens, there's somebody kind of really sanctimonious running a show twenty four hours a day trying to make money off of it..." Of course NBC was saturated with sensational coverage of all of those stories as well.

By Kyle Drennen | September 17, 2014 | 4:19 PM EDT

As reported by Politico, recently dumped Meet the Press moderator David Gregory moderated a panel for the No Labels Strategic Agenda conference in Washington on Wednesday and lectured his media colleagues: "[I]n Washington political journalism the narrative gets set, and it gets set early and built on. And things that fight the narrative get harder to report out, I think, often because of laziness in media."

Given that Meet the Press on his watch was routinely a place to promote the conventional wisdom of Washington, Gregory is hardly one to accuse other journalists of lazily accepting inside-the-beltway spin in political coverage.

By Mark Finkelstein | September 15, 2014 | 6:12 PM EDT

Can Touré Neblett not see the incandescent irony of his statement?  His show-ending rant on The Cycle today condemned the censorship of the shocking images of war. Railed Touré: "we're blocked from seeing so much of the cost of war, of the evil of war as if we are too sensitive or squeamish or unable to handle the graphic truth."

Touré focused on one particular photo, taken by photo-journalist Kenneth Jarecke during the first Gulf War, deploring the fact that AP refused to publish it. Incredibly, Touré  then proceeded to . . . censor the photo himself, declaring that it's "so graphic I can't show it to you now."  Hello?

By Seton Motley | August 18, 2014 | 8:52 AM EDT

It takes a special man to cram so much wrong into a mere 342 words.  Or an Old Grey Lady.

The New York Times utterly ridiculous Editorial Board recently as one addressed Title II Internet regulatory Reclassification and Network Neutrality - and they did so in utterly ridiculous fashion. 

They either have absolutely no idea what any of this is - or they are lying through their printing presses.

By Tom Johnson | August 16, 2014 | 7:01 AM EDT

This week, three of the most prominent liberal bloggers agreed that when it comes to criticizing presidents of either party about their vacations, people really need to, as one of the bloggers put it, “STFU.”

Do they have a point, or should the appropriateness of presidential vacations be evaluated on a POTUS-by-POTUS basis? Check out their thoughts and comment if you’d like.

By Seton Motley | June 16, 2014 | 9:09 AM EDT

So it turns out there that something doesn't have to be true to be funny.

Many a thinking American - who knows media bias - finds the following perversely appropriate.

Young Get News From Comedy Central

Tom Brokaw, Peter Jennings, Dan Rather ... and Jon Stewart?

Readers over 30 might scoff at Stewart's inclusion - assuming they know who he is. For many under 30, the host of Comedy Central's "The Daily Show" is, improbably, a source for news.