History

By Ann Coulter | August 9, 2012 | 11:43 PM EDT

Fifty years from now, everyone will agree that Karl Rove committed treason by revealing the identity of CIA "spy" Valerie Plame, tea partiers shouted the N-word at a black congressman and Duke lacrosse players gang-raped a stripper. Liberals tell whopping lies, and most conservatives can't be bothered to learn history.

In the last few days, we've heard both George Will and Charles Krauthammer, otherwise intelligent people, repeating bogus Democratic talking points about how Joe McCarthy allegedly smeared innocents with false allegations.

By Ken Shepherd | August 9, 2012 | 6:00 PM EDT

A small business owner in a crucial swing state has found herself losing business from loyal customers due to her ad being featured in a Mitt Romney campaign ad. It seems her customers believe she is a Romney backer, but in fact she prefers to keep politics out of her business. And so this business owner demanded that the Romney camp either pull the ad or blur her deli's name from the frames that it's in. The campaign, she says, ignored her pleas.

You didn't hear about that story? Well, you certainly would if it actually happened, but, you see, this is the case of deli owner Debra Krause-McDonnell whose complaint is with President Obama's reelection campaign, reported Jane Prendergast in today's Cincinnati Enquirer:

By Tim Graham | August 4, 2012 | 7:31 AM EDT

NPR is the network that sought out Christopher Hitchens to trash Mother Teresa upon her death as a horrible fraud, and then when Hitchens died, they warmly remembered how he hated God and Mother Teresa. So it's not surprising that radical leftist and gay activist Gore Vidal was going to be honored without a second of dissent or disapproval of critics.

None of the glowing obituaries and appreciations carried an ideological label, and one -- on Wednesday night's All Things Considered -- contained a glaring falsehood -- that William F. Buckley called Vidal a "queer" on national TV in 1968 without being provoked. Vidal called him a "crypto-Nazi" first. NPR turned to the gay novelist Christopher Bram to do the honors, and he brazenly lied:

 

By Tim Graham | July 4, 2012 | 12:27 PM EDT

Perhaps Chris Rock should consider following Alec Baldwin out the Twitter door after this sneering Fourth of July tweet at all his white fans (and patriotic people of every race):  "Happy white peoples independence day the slaves weren't free but I'm sure they enjoyed fireworks".

This is the same guy that compared the Tea Party to bratty racist kids who act insane before they go to bed:

By Rich Noyes | July 4, 2012 | 9:38 AM EDT

For most Americans, the Fourth of July is an occasion to remember how remarkable America is, and to celebrate the wisdom of the Founding Fathers in establishing a nation where freedom is the order of the day. But over the years, the Media Research Center has caught journalists using Independence Day as an occasion for scorn and condemnation. Here are a few examples, drawn from MRC's Notable Quotables newsletter:

Hope You Had A Happy Fourth of July, Too

"Oh say, we've seen too much. The Star-Spangled Banner pushes like a cough through America's mouth and the twilight's last gleaming is just that, a sickly flash above our heads as we ride unsuspecting in the bellies of sleek trains, plop to our knees in churches, embracing truths that disgust us."
Boston Globe arts critic and "poet" Patricia Smith in The Nation's "Patriotism" issue, July 15/22, 1991.

By R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr. | June 21, 2012 | 10:20 AM EDT

Warren Kozak, the author of "LeMay: The Life and Wars of General Curtis LeMay," wrote a memorable piece in "The Wall Street Journal" on June 6, 2012 that cries out for comment. On the 68th anniversary of the Allies' invasion of Europe over the bloody beaches of Normandy, he reminds us of an unthinkable act by President Franklin Roosevelt on that day. At least it is an unthinkable act today. The president did not call a press conference to notify Americans huddled before their radios of what our military was doing. They already knew from news reports, though they might have learned even more from their president. Nor did President Roosevelt boast of how he had marshaled our troops and given the order to action, as the present occupier of his office is prone to do.

Instead, Roosevelt offered a prayer, a prayer of unthinkable dimensions nowadays. I suspect if I were of voting age in 1944, I would have been a Republican. Yet, as President Roosevelt spoke, he would have spoken for me. Transported back to the battle of Normandy, I would have taken heart in his words. Would a Barack Obama, similarly transported back across the decades, have taken heart? Or would he and millions of other miraculously transported Americans from the present have squirmed? Would they have filed lawsuits through the American Civil Liberties Union? Is this not another of those church and state conundrums that we conjure up today?

By Tim Graham | June 19, 2012 | 8:22 PM EDT

On Tuesday’s Morning Edition, National Public Radio promoted an Atlanta rapper named “Killer Mike” and his “politically charged” song called “Reagan.”

Somehow, they left out that Atlanta-based "artist" Michael Render ends the song with “I’m glad Reagan dead” and regurgitates the old conspiracy theory that Reagan and Ollie North imported cocaine into the inner cities:

By R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr. | June 14, 2012 | 6:19 PM EDT

One of my favorite controversialists is back, Bob Woodward, with his sidekick Carl Bernstein. Sunday in "The Washington Post," they wrote that Richard Nixon was more hideous than we have heretofore known. The 37th president conducted five wars while in office, according to the boys, and those do not even include his minor fracases, the Cold War against the Soviet Union and the Vietnam War.

I say Woodward is a controversialist. You might recall his controversial "interview" with CIA Director Bill Casey conducted on Bill's deathbed when no one was watching. It made it into Woodward's book "Veil," saving its author from the embarrassment of admitting that Bill had kept Woodward utterly in the dark about Iran-Contra and so much else during their more conventional interviews earlier. This time, Woodward somehow circumvented Bill's CIA guards, his doctors and nurses, his wife and daughter — one of whom was in the hospital room at all times — to get his incomparable interview. Moreover, Bill had completely lost the power of speech, his face being a mask of terrible deformity, as his friend Bert Jolis reported within days of the so-called interview. Woodward overcame every hurdle to extract from the dying man a confession of involvement in Iran-Contra about which Woodward knew nothing while writing the book. Possibly, he had disguised himself in Bill's hospital room as a cockroach.

By Randy Hall | June 12, 2012 | 4:44 PM EDT

The BuzzFeed Website carried an article on Monday based on an interview with former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush in which he said that his father, George H. W. Bush, and Ronald Reagan would have a difficult time getting nominated by today's “ultra-conservative” Republican Party in a “hyper-partisan moment.”

The only problem is that Bush never used the words “ultra-conservative” or “hyper-partisan”in the interview (at least not in any of the text provided).. Those words were added by the unidentified “BuzzFeed Staff” who wrote the article.

By Matthew Sheffield | June 12, 2012 | 9:59 AM EDT

More than likely, you've already heard about David Maraniss's new book Barack Obama: The Story and news reports that President Obama created a "composite" character of a girlfriend who actually never existed.

It turns out, the fake girlfriend is only one of several fake people with whom Obama pretended to have life-changing moments as Andrew Ferguson writes in a review of Maraniss's book for the Weekly Standard. As Ferguson discovers, Barack Obama was the first person to make up fake warm fuzzy stories about himself, something his subsequent presidential campaign would later make the primary justification to elect him:

By Matthew Sheffield | June 1, 2012 | 12:41 PM EDT

Sometimes it's the little things that reveal the persistent liberal Democratic bias in the elite media. Writing in the American Spectator, Jeffrey Lord notes that the recent media kerfuffle over the fact that Mitt Romney's wife, Ann, enjoys riding horses is actually demonstrative of how journalists seemingly cannot help themselves.

You see, the media were not always so averse to presidential spouses enjoying equestrian activities. Back when John F. Kennedy's wife, Jackie, enjoyed them, they were regarded in a much different light by the left-dominated media:

By Brent Baker | May 29, 2012 | 1:12 AM EDT

Accurate, but not true. It took 23 years, but on Sunday morning’s Face the Nation, Bob Schieffer contended “everything” in his 1989 book, which provided a derogatory look from the left at the Reagan presidency, was “accurate” – yet “not entirely true.”

The leading title of the book published in January of 1989, when Schieffer held the role of “Chief Washington correspondent” for CBS News, The Acting President: Ronald Reagan and the Supporting Players Who Helped Him Create the Illusion That Held America Spellbound.