History

By Tim Graham | November 10, 2014 | 1:27 PM EST

The November 17 edition of People magazine includes a promotional article for Timothy Shriver’s new book Fully Alive, focusing on “The Forgotten Kennedy,” the lobotomized Rosemary Kennedy, sister to Jack, Bobby and Teddy.

"Why are we hiding from this story?" he asked himself, according to People’s Liz O’Neil. "There's nothing to fear here. It's a human story. It's a heroic story.” Heroically lobotomized and institutionalized? Apparently, this fiasco was “the true inspiration for his famous family’s love of service.”

By Brent Baker | November 10, 2014 | 2:03 AM EST

As part of Face the Nation’s 60th anniversary program on Sunday, the CBS newscast played clips of interviews with current, future and past Presidents – including Ronald Reagan in 1970 being asked by CBS News correspondent Bill Stout about calling a state official a “lying son of a bitch.” Watch the video to hear how Reagan, then the Governor of California, responded with an answer which earned its place in the highlight reel.

By Rich Noyes | November 8, 2014 | 2:11 PM EST

Twenty-five years ago, the largely peaceful revolutions of 1989 — epitomized by the fall of the Berlin Wall on November 9 of that year — ended the grip of communism in Eastern Europe. Looking back at journalism’s track record on communism, one finds a press that was too willing to act as a mouthpiece for the world’s worst dictatorships, and too accepting of the perverse claim that communism meant safety and security for its people.

By Tim Graham | November 3, 2014 | 4:08 PM EST

Former Newsweek and New York Times Magazine writer Matt Bai has a new book out making the wild claim that the 1987 adultery scandal around Sen. Gary Hart marked "the week politics went tabloid" and ruined everything in national politics by pushing the media into focusing incessantly on the "character issue."

In a review Sunday in The New York Times Book Review, Reuters media columnist Jack Shafer pointed out the press was so cozy with Hart that Nixon-ruining Bob Woodward offered to let Hart quietly bunk at his house during marital troubles:

By Tim Graham | November 2, 2014 | 8:40 PM EST

In the October 13 edition of Time, they asked radical-left black professor Cornel West if he voted for Obama in 2012, and he said he couldn’t vote for a “war criminal.” NPR promoted this radical leftist on Saturday morning’s Weekend Edition, but in six minutes and 22 seconds, never mentioned the president or the 2014 elections.

This syrupy interview promoting West’s book Black Prophetic Fire ended with anchor Scott Simon utterly failing to notice (again) that the leftist Ferguson narrative of Evil Cop Shoots Gentle Giant is facing a serious clash with facts.

By Rich Noyes | November 1, 2014 | 2:25 PM EDT

Looking back at 2006, the media weren’t wagging their fingers at Democrats warning that, if they won Congress, it was their job to become responsible partners for then-President George W. Bush. Instead, the media were rejoicing at the idea that an all-Democratic Congress could tie up the Bush administration with subpoenas, and even impeachment.

By Tim Graham | October 24, 2014 | 11:49 AM EDT

Friday’s Washington Post unleashed a weird attack against Kenneth Starr after all these years. The front-page headline was “Surprise support for Lewinsky’s complaint: Report on 1998 interview says prosecutors mistreated intern during Clinton inquiry.”

Why would the Post dig up a 2000 report by Ken Starr's successor as independent counsel? At the end of Rosalind Helderman’s story, she said “The Post sought the report after being contacted by Jim Lichtman, a writer and lecturer on ethics...” Who? Jim Lichtman also wrote an E-book attacking Rush Limbaugh, Glenn Beck, and Ann Coulter titled “Shameless: The Ethical Case Against Three Out-of-Control Critics and the Need for Civility Now, More than Ever.”

By Tim Graham | October 11, 2014 | 2:00 PM EDT

Huffington Post media correspondent Michael Calderone reported on the latest batch of documents released from the Clinton Presidential Library. It shows that not only did MSNBC host Keith Olbermann beat his breast across the media in 1998 about his overflowing guilt over covering the Monica Lewinsky-presidential perjury story. He actually wrote to the president about it.

A presidential aide named R. Scott Michaud referred to an e-mail from the MSNBC star: “Keith Olbermann has written to POTUS [President of the United States] apologize for, ‘whatever part I may have played in perpetuating this ceaseless coverage (of the Lewinsky story)…. I’ll be heading back to my previous career in sports as quickly as possible.’” Clinton aides planned a warm presidential reply.

By Tim Graham | October 8, 2014 | 7:13 AM EDT

It’s easily guessed that no one at the New York Times would welcome a book titled “The Assassination of Barack Obama.” But the Times is in love with a book titled “The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher.”

This book of short stories by British author Hilary Mantel graced the cover of Sunday’s book review, but mysteriously, that review by Terry Castle didn’t discuss the short story on killing Thatcher while she was Britain's prime minister until the penultimate paragraph. That’s because I missed the Gray Lady’s other celebrations of Mantel’s Maggie-murder tale.

By Tom Johnson | October 5, 2014 | 8:26 PM EDT

Conservative-approved lessons on topics including the War on Poverty, the legacy of slavery, and U.S. foreign policy would mislead the students of America.

By Kyle Drennen | September 16, 2014 | 3:56 PM EDT

During the first installment of PBS's The Roosevelts: An Intimate History on Sunday, historian Clay Jenkinson and former Newsweek editor turned historian Evan Thomas slammed Theodore Roosevelt as a bloodthirsty "imperialist" who promoted the "glorification of war" and built up a "cult" of personality. [Listen to the audio]

Speaking on Roosevelt's command of the Rough Riders during the Spanish-American War, Jenkinson proclaimed: "There's no question that Roosevelt is an imperialist. Apologists like to try to play this down. But the fact is he's probably the most significant imperialist in American history." Jenkinson seemed troubled by Roosevelt's call for the United States to "take our place in the world's arena."

By Kristine Marsh | September 12, 2014 | 10:37 AM EDT

This weekend marks the 200th Anniversary of the Battle of Fort McHenry, the battle which inspired Francis Scott Key to write our national anthem, “The Star Spangled Banner.”

In honor of that historic day, we’ve compiled a list of some of the memorable moments the flag was lifted and shown reverence.