Celebrities

By Jackie Seal | June 3, 2014 | 1:30 PM EDT

On the Monday, June 2 edition of The View, in a rare moment, the notably liberal hosts took to blasting liberal actresses Gwyneth Paltrow and Charlize Theron for the ludicrous, offensive comments they each made recently which seemed to minimize the real trials and hardships of military veterans and rape victims respectively.

Theron lamented that when someone like herself starts reading negative comments about herself online “you start feeling raped.” while Paltrow compared negative online comments to suffering through combat, because in war “you go through this bloody, dehumanizing thing.” The ladies of The View were not amused and spent some time warning Paltrow, specifically, of comparing her posh life as an actress to the rigors of battle.

By Tim Graham | June 3, 2014 | 8:18 AM EDT

How radical is Hollywood? There are two competing movie projects sure to lionize Edward Snowden betraying America’s secrets. Naturally, one of them is helmed by Oliver Stone, who bows to no one in casting America as a global supervillain. See his Untold History of the United States bilge on Showtime.

"This is one of the greatest stories of our time," said the leftist director. "A real challenge." Stone has repeatedly called Snowden a "hero" and slammed President Obama as a "disgrace" for his "Bush-style eavesdropping techniques." A rival Snowden movie based on Glenn Greenwald's Snowden book No Place to Hide is also in the works from Michael Wilson and Barbara Broccoli,  producers of the James Bond movies. Alongside the Brian Williams softball special on NBC, there’s a “Snowden business” emerging:

By Jeffrey Lord | May 31, 2014 | 7:16 AM EDT

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Correction appended. Seth Rogen did not send the tweet mentioned below.)

Lights, action - cue the Leftists! Or, what comes around, goes around.

Seth Rogen, a Hollywood favorite as star or a supporting player in such gems as Knocked Up, The Green Hornet,The 40 Year Old Virgin and more, is having  what one might call a Martin Niemoller moment. Niemoller was the German Lutheran pastor who had the nerve to publicly oppose Hitler, being rewarded with seven years in a concentration camp. Niemoller famously wrote of the experience:

By Tim Graham | May 30, 2014 | 8:02 PM EDT

During an interview with Sky News on Friday, actress Charlize Theron explained that "every aspect" of her life has become "fodder," and the fact that she doesn't Google herself is her "saving grace." She added, "When you start living in that world, and doing that, you start feeling raped."

The Huffington Post noted Theron is “not the first actress to compare the press intruding into her personal life to rape, and she certainly won't be the last -- but wouldn't it be nice if she were?”

By Tim Graham | May 29, 2014 | 8:15 AM EDT

Actor Mark Ruffalo, currently starring in the Reagan-bashing AIDS drama “The Normal Heart” on HBO, told The Wrap website that any debate about gun control lingering in the wake of America's most recent mass shooting in Santa Barbara is “completely outrageous.”

“I don't know how many more of these are going to happen before we start to act like adults, instead of running around like a bunch of selfish children because there's some sort of machismo connected with the idea of having militarized weaponry sitting in your closet,” Ruffalo told TheWrap. ”It's just ridiculous. And our kids are paying the price.”

By Ken Shepherd | May 27, 2014 | 3:48 PM EDT

Actor Seth Rogen and director/producer Judd Apatow are hitting back at a Washington Post film critic for strongly suggesting that the sort of movies churned out by the duo are partly to blame for Elliot Rodger's deadly killing spree on Friday. For his part, Apatow effectively blasted Ann Hornaday for, well, trolling.

Jessica Chasmar of the Washington Times has the story (emphasis mine):

By Lillian Bozzone | May 21, 2014 | 12:19 PM EDT

A darling of the lefty entertainment establishment has taken a prosthetic nose dive into hot water. At Macklemore’s May 16 Seattle performance at the opening of “Spectacle: The Music Video,” the rapper lionized for his pro-gay stance appeared on stage in a stereotypical Jewish costume, singing his hit, “Thrift Shop.”

Bad move for a guy celebrated for injecting “tolerance and acceptance and equal rights” into hip hop.

By Tim Graham | May 20, 2014 | 8:23 AM EDT

NPR’s shooting rhetorical bullets at that “ill-informed so-called journalist” Bill O’Reilly again, for daring to criticize Beyonce recently for her skimpy outfit on a cover of Time magazine.

The show is “Here and Now,” out of Boston, now airing on almost 500 NPR affiliates. On Friday, host Robin Young somehow went from a black-and-white photo of Beyonce in bikini shorts to feminist hysterics about American history: “I'm going to jump in to say that Jezebel stereotype was used to blame black women for their own rape, for instance....Well, if she weren't so sexy, then the white men wouldn't have to assault them.”

By Julia A. Seymour | May 16, 2014 | 12:59 PM EDT

The Jill Abramson firing continues to gain wide attention in media circles. Buzzfeed released an exclusive story linking it to a 96-page internal memo about innovation. That memo showed the Times willing to consult with at least 354 people inside and outside the organization.

Along with one highly unusual choice – actor/model Fabio. Fabio, that’s right, Fabio. The Italian actor known to many for his “I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter” commercials in the 1990s is nestled in the midst of some of the top names in journalism.

By Ken Shepherd | May 12, 2014 | 4:32 PM EDT

Actor Dean Cain, best known for his title role in the 1990s series Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman, recently sat down with Tom Bevan of Real Clear Politics for an interview in RCP's Changing Lanes web series.

Among other things, Cain talked about his political leanings -- socially liberal but conservative on foreign, military, and economic policies -- as well as his disagreements with the Obama administration. "A president's job is supposed to be to enforce our laws, which, it seems to have gone by the wayside at this point in time," Cain observed. After Bevan asked what Cain's biggest "gripe" was with the Obama administration, the actor replied [emphasis mine; watch video below page break]:

By Christian Toto | May 10, 2014 | 7:02 AM EDT

Sean Penn is taking a page out of President Barack Obama's playbook but twisting it to his own socialist-friendly liking. Obama has gotten plenty of mileage for blaming his predecessor for the country's woes.

Now, Penn is blaming Venezuelan president Nicolas Maduro's problems on what the leader inherited from his predecessor--Hugo Chavez. Only Penn doesn't blame his late friend at all, preferring to spin a yarn about paranoia and relationships meant to excuse the late leader from guilt.

By Tim Graham | April 24, 2014 | 9:02 AM EDT

Greg Gilman at The Wrap has the details on how actor George Clooney fiercely came to the defense of his "longtime friend" Barack Obama in an argument with Las Vegas casino mogul Steve Wynn two weeks ago.

Wynn told the Las Vegas Review Journal that Clooney “got drunk” from downing tequila shots and stormed off after delivering an F-bomb. Clooney "stood up and threw a hissy fit” when one of two CAA executives also seated at the table told a joke about former Soviet Union President Mikhail Gorbachev. Wynn says he rubbed Clooney the wrong way when the actor “sat down and started talking about the Affordable Care Act.”