AP: Money Comes From 'Special Interests' for Republican, 'Outside Groups' for Dem

Q. When are special interest contributions not special interest contributions?

A. When they're made to a Democratic candidate.  And the Associated Press is reporting on the matter.

No political race in my little upstate New York neck of the woods has attracted national attention in a long time - until this year.  The retirement of liberal Republican Sherwood Boehlert meant an open seat in New York's 24th Congressional District.  The Republicans have held the seat for many years, and continue to hold a registration edge.  But in the current political climate, the Democrats apparently believe they have a genuine shot at winning, and as a result are pouring money into the race.

Enter the Associated Press.  It has put out an article on the finances of the two candidates - Republican NY State Senator Ray Meier [pictured here], and Democrat Michael Arcuri, Oneida County District Attorney.

And what do you know?  According to the AP, the Republican's money comes largely from 'special interests.'  Not the Democrat's.  His is from 'outside groups.'  Here's how the AP played it:

Speaking of Republican Meier: "About 41 percent of the $496,913 he raised came from special interests and Republican lawmakers across the country."

Speaking of Democrat Arcuri: "More money should be coming from outside groups as national and state Democrats, including Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, work to persuade their supporters that the party has a good shot at picking up the GOP seat." 

See what I mean?

Finkelstein lives in the liberal haven of Ithaca, NY, where he hosts the award-winning public-access TV show 'Right Angle.' Contact him at mark@gunhill.net

Mark Finkelstein
Mark Finkelstein is a contributing editor for NewsBusters.