Zarqawi’s ‘Troubled Childhood’ Leads to Terror?

<p><img hspace="0" src="media/2006-06-08-MSNBC-FLrehberger.jpg" align="right" border="0" />The MRC has been following the media’s reaction to the death of terrorist mastermind Abu Musab al Zarqawi all day. Much of the coverage has been focused on <a href="node/5766">downplaying</a> the significance of the event. Now we have a new angle. MSNBC anchor <a href="http://www.nbccableinfo.com/insidenbccable/networks/msnbc/prog/people/re... Rehberger</a> hosted <em>First Look</em>, the early morning coverage of Zarqawi’s death. At 5:45AM EDT, in an attempt to give her audience a full picture, this is how she described the life of a brutal murderer: </p><blockquote dir="ltr" style="MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px"><p>Milissa Rehberger: &quot; I just want to take a pause for just a second to bring everyone up to date <b>on who Abu Musab al Zarqawi really was</b>, other then the leader of Al Qaeda in Iraq who was killed in an air strike this morning. <b>We are told that he had a troubled childhood </b>where he grew up in Jordan, that he dropped out of high school, that when he was 20-years-old, he went to Afghanistan and joined Al Qaeda.&quot; </p></blockquote><p>A troubled childhood? If only he’d graduated from high school or attended Rob Reiner’s universal <a href="http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2005/04/19/BAGKJCAU0I1.... program, perhaps his life would have had a different direction. </p><p>(A special thanks to Michelle Humphrey for the heads up.)</p>

Scott Whitlock
Scott Whitlock
Scott Whitlock is the senior news analyst for the Media Research Center and a contributing editor for NewsBusters.org