CNN Agrees With Tom Hanks Company to Make Ten-Part 'Sixties' Documentary

CNN reached a deal with liberal actor Tom Hanks and his Playtone company to create a ten-part documentary on The Sixties. Hanks is “in talks” to be the narrator. These are the same folks that brought America the liberal movie “Game Change,” starring an utterly fictional and psychotic Sarah Palin.

CNN boss Jeff Zucker said, “Projects like this are emblematic of exactly the type of programming that we need more of, signifying a new direction and expanded sensibility at CNN.” New direction? Away from their own news reporters? A.J. Marechal at Variety found the usual liberal talking heads will be provided:

Historians including David McCullough, Robert Dallek and Robert Caro will lend their voices to the docuseries, along with veteran journos Dan Rather and Robert MacNeil.

Perhaps Rather can remind viewers that in the 1960s, technology was too antiquated to base your Republican-whacking hit pieces on grainy faxes from Kinko's Kopies. Or perhaps can actually recount his bizarre theories on George W. Bush's Texas Air National Guard service.

It’s set to debut to mark the 50th anniversary of John F. Kennedy’s assassination on November 22, and “will then return to CNN’s lineup in April, with segs focused on music, tech advancements, drugs and the ‘free love’ movement.”

“What we really want to do is reintroduce the story and the impact of that decade, and make it relevant to the audience that has great familiarity with it, while also appealing to a younger generation,” proclaimed CNN vice president Vinnie Malhotra. “It goes beyond just a history lesson. There are heavy subjects we’ll take on, but we were adamant to look at the ’60s in terms of its influence on pop culture and America, as well.”

“The Sixties” will be a part of CNN’s primetime lineup next spring, with Malhotra noting, “We’re looking at it as a major television event.”

Tim Graham
Tim Graham
Tim Graham is Executive Editor of NewsBusters and is the Media Research Center’s Director of Media Analysis