NBC's Savannah Guthrie Admits 'Many People' in Media 'Uniformly Support Same-Sex Marriage'

In a panel discussion on Thursday's NBC Today about President Obama announcing his support for gay marriage on Wednesday, co-host Savannah Guthrie confessed to the group of all liberal pundits: "...so many people in the media seem to uniformly support same-sex marriage." [Listen to the audio or watch the video after the jump]

That fact was made blatantly obvious by the discussion that preceded Guthrie's admission. The panel featured openly gay CNBC host Suze Orman, who voiced her support of the President's move: "Yeah, part of me is like, 'What took you so long, President Obama?' This is something that should have been done, in my opinion anyway – obviously, I would think that – a long time ago."

Attorney Star Jones praised Obama for having "made a decision based on truly what he felt" and proclaimed: "...you can't be a lawyer in the United States of America and not recognize that unequal rights is discrimination and fundamentally unfair, fundamentally un-American."

After Guthrie wondered if the decision would cause "blowback at the polls" for the President in November, advertising executive Donny Deutsch cheered Obama's political brilliance: "Okay, not only did he do the morally right thing, because – you know, amen, good for the President....I actually think it's a political brilliant move, because it sets him up against Romney."

Deutsch proceeded to bizarrely argue that Obama's complete reversal on gay marriage actually proved Mitt Romney was the one lacking conviction: "Romney is the flip-flopper. There's no soul there, whereas Barack Obama, like him or not like him, he's a man of principle and conviction."

Guthrie pointed out Obama being in favor of gay marriage earlier in his political career, before being against it and then for it again. Deutsch was undeterred: "...but that's why he's come full circle. Whereas, people knew what he believed and so he has to stand for what he believes. And it is not only the morally right thing, it's the politically right thing."

Orman defended Obama changing his mind: "And this is an issue, by the way, that many do flip-flop on."

After acknowledging media support of gay marriage, Guthrie actually recognized the legitimacy of the opposition: "Do you think that this dialogue we're having nationally doesn't adequately recognize that for many people, this is an issue that they struggle with and don't believe in?"

Jones agreed: "I'm a member of...a traditional African-American church....people who really believe that they want to be Christ-like and walk in his path, they struggle with sticking to the traditions of Christianity, yet being fair to their fellow man. And I know that that is a legitimate argument." Guthrie added: "Right, reasonable people, I think, probably can differ." Jones replied: "Absolutely."

Earlier on the morning show, left-wing openly gay MSNBC host Rachel Maddow attacked opponents: "It's a very, very conservative Republican Party on this issue....Mitt Romney, who wants to roll back gay rights nationwide."


Here is a full transcript of the May 10 panel discussion:

9:07AM ET SEGMENT:

SAVANNAH GUTHRIE: And now to Today's Professionals, our panel of power players taking on the hottest stories making news. Star Jones is an attorney and author. Donny Deutsch is chairman of Deutsch Incorporated and pinch hitting for Dr. Nancy Snyderman today is Suze Orman, who's host of CNBC's The Suze Orman Show. Good morning to all of you.

STAR JONES: Good morning.
    
DONNY DEUTSCH: Hey, Savannah.

GUTHRIE: Suze, especially nice to see you.

SUZE ORMAN: Thank you.

GUTHRIE: Let's start with the big news we heard yesterday, the President making it clear he endorses same-sex marriage. This was something that a lot of people were not shocked to find out, since he said he'd been evolving in this issue. Do you think it was smart for him to come out now before the election? Suze, I'll start with you.

ORMAN: Yeah, part of me is like, "What took you so long, President Obama?" This is something that should have been done, in my opinion anyway – obviously, I would think that – a long time ago. I do think it was smart for him because everybody already knew that's what he felt. So why wait til – for a few months? I would have done it now. I think it was great. I think Vice President Joe Biden, however, pushed the issue with it.

GUTHRIE: That may be. Suze raises a good point, though. Does the President get the full credit he would get with supporters because it took some time? Perhaps it took the prodding of Vice President Biden.

STAR JONES: I think maybe he gets a little bit more credit because it shows that it was a considered decision. You know, say what you want about the President. At least you feel as if he made a decision based on truly what he felt. Not on policy that he can or cannot change state by state. But if you – you can't be a lawyer in the United States of America and not recognize that unequal rights is discrimination and fundamentally unfair, fundamentally un-American.

GUTHRIE: Will there be blowback at the polls? I mean, because obviously, the people that don't support the President never will, but there are certain – for example, African-American ministers...

DEUTSCH: Sure.

JONES: Definitely.

GUTHRIE: ...certain Latinos, who do not support same-sex marriage.

DEUTSCH: Okay, not only did he do the morally right thing, because – you know, amen, good for the President – interesting enough, the reason he was not doing it was politically. I actually think it's a political brilliant move, because it sets him up against Romney. Romney is the flip-flopper. There's no soul there, whereas Barack Obama, like him or not like him, he's a man of principle and conviction. It's the same thing that made Santorum appealing, even though I disagree with everything he stood for, at least the man was true to who he was.

GUTHRIE: Donny, would you take that same position if you knew that initially when he ran for state senate, he said he supported same-sex marriage. When he ran for U.S. Senate, he said he was against it. And now he says-

DEUTSCH: But that's why he's – but that's why he's come full circle. Whereas, people knew what he believed and so he has to stand for what he believes. And it is not only the morally right thing, it's the politically right thing.

ORMAN: And this is an issue, by the way, that many do flip-flop on. Listen, I've been a gay woman my entire life.

DEUTSCH: No way.

ORMAN: Donny.

DEUTSCH: Wow, she said that on national television.

GUTHRIE: So don't try to date her, Donny.

DEUTSCH: Hey, wait a second.

ORMAN: Oh, he already went there.

JONES: He already went there, it doesn't matter.

ORMAN: Please, please. But here's the thing, is that you come out. Your parents don't like it at first. Everybody's got to get used to it. And it takes – you need time to get used to it. He needed time. He changed his mind.

GUTHRIE: That's a good point actually, because you know, so many people in the media seem to uniformly support same-sex marriage. Do you think that this dialogue we're having nationally doesn't adequately recognize that for many people, this is an issue that they struggle with and don't believe in?

JONES: It really is an issue that people struggle with. And you mentioned African-American pastors. I'm a member of an African-American – a traditional African-American church.

DEUTSCH: You're African-American?

JONES: I'm black, yes.

ORMAN: I'm gay, she's African-American.

DEUTSCH: This is a big exposition.

JONES: My point is that people who really believe that they want to be Christ-like and walk in his path, they struggle with sticking to the traditions of Christianity, yet being fair to their fellow man. And I know that that is a legitimate argument.

GUTHRIE: Right, reasonable people, I think, probably can differ.

JONES: Absolutely.    

Kyle Drennen
Kyle Drennen
Kyle Drennen is a News Analyst for MRC