Jimmy Carter: Bush not in line with American Values

Every now and then, America wakes up to hear the nonsensical and pathetic whinings of what many believe to be America's worst president in the last 50 years.  I refer to Jimmy Carter, who lately, cannot seem to appreciate the immortal words of Clintonista James Carville, who pondered over the wise and sagacious "glory of the unspoken thought."In Carter's case, that would mean honoring the unwritten yet scrupulously-adhered to history of former presidents not attacking a sitting-president.  Carter not only throws this maxim out the window, he even writes a book about it.In his new book "Our Endangered Values," Former-President carter lashes out yet again at Current president Bush: "In the last 5 years there's been a dramatic and disturbing and radical change in the values of this country;  We don't wait until our country is threatened,  we publicly announced our new policy is to attack a county, invade a country, bomb a county." But this is nothing new for Carter, or even Democratic former-presidents in general, as we have seen Bill Clinton bad-mouth Bush on foreign soil as well as at home.Reporter Tess Koppelman of Fox 4 News tries valiantly to rehabilitate Carter by finishing up her book-blurb regarding Carter's efforts this way: "Carter hopes his book helps Americans debate these issues and decide on election day what America's future will look like. Carter's own presidency was controversial, but since then his humanitarian efforts in the world earned him a Nobel Peace Prize."If you believe that, then you'll believe that what America needs right now is a former peanut farmer from Georgia who went on to become the 39th President of the United States-- and nearly destroyed this country militarily and economically, and now promotes his "good name" by trying to besmirch the names of others.Jimmy Carter was, and still is, a continuous disaster-in-the-making for America.  One would hope that Carter would just concentrate on what he does best: driving nails into wood, and giving the word "irrelevancy" a new and poignant meaning when discussing former presidents.