Religious Right

By Tom Johnson | October 11, 2014 | 7:28 PM EDT

Ed Kilgore says conservative Christians don’t want to put up with unpleasant things like “equality” and “rights” and “government schools.”

By Tom Johnson | September 28, 2014 | 7:16 PM EDT

The lefty blogger claims that Christian conservatives, given the chance to protect the liberty of others to practice different faiths, “turn right back into the theocrats they always were, interested only in having government endorsement of their religion.”

By Tom Johnson | September 19, 2014 | 9:19 PM EDT

The lefty writer says conservatives are at war with reality, and they want schoolkids in the Lone Star State and elsewhere to learn illusions about American history.

Marcotte’s peg was a report from the liberal Texas Freedom Network alleging, in Marcotte’s words, “that conservatives have been able to inject a shocking number of lies and disinformation into [Texas] public school history classrooms.”

By Tom Johnson | September 8, 2014 | 9:22 PM EDT

The Missouri legislature may override Gov. Jay Nixon's veto of a 72-hour abortion waiting period. If that happens, it's another victory for social conservatives' quest to impose religious law in America.

By Connor Williams | July 18, 2014 | 5:53 PM EDT

In a bigoted screed against Christians, Alternet’s Valerie Tarico wrote a piece appearing at Salon.com that accused evangelical Christians of being evildoers who – in their spare time – kill and abuse gay people, subjugate women, destroy the Earth, oppose rights for children, and promote holy war. Yes, this is no exaggeration. It appears that this is a new low, if that was even possible for frequent Hardball guest Joan Walsh’s website.

The condescension directed toward evangelical Christians is palpable throughout the piece, and it borders on abject hatred, concluding with a passive-aggressive line that suggests Tarico has fantasies of the slaughter of conservative Christians.

By Kristine Marsh | July 10, 2014 | 3:36 PM EDT

It doesn’t take much to make “news” in The Washington Post these days. 

Upset at the Supreme Court’s Hobby Lobby ruling, last Thursday 29-year-old feminist New Yorker Jasmine Shea decided it would be a great idea to leave condoms randomly around a Latham, New York, Hobby Lobby store and spell out the phrase “Pro-Choice” with block letters in various places. Of course she took lots of selfies posing next to her artwork to post to Instagram and Twitter. For that she made a national story in The Washington Post July 9. 

It’s a mystery how Shea, who has a mere 286 followers on Instagram, and about 800 on Twitter, which is small beans compared to the typical popular user, somehow managed to get her “activism” noticed by a leading national newspaper. Shea herself even tweeted, “I’m still in disbelief I’m newsworthy.” (Hint for Shea: your ideological conferes at The Post really, really want to see a popular feminist backlash to Hobby Lobby, and they’re not above manufacturing one.) 

July 8, 2014 | 7:53 PM EDT

Liberals have been spewing absolute nonsense since the Supreme Court ruled in favor of Hobby Lobby, Conestoga Wood, and several other businesses that filed a suit against the HHS contraception mandate. Salon’s Paul Rosenberg is no different, except the fevered, high-pitched whine of his hysteria makes one suspect that, whatever he pays his drycleaner, it ain’t enough. 

In a July 8 piece at Salon, Rosenberg actually tried to make the case that “right-wing propaganda about “‘religious liberty’” is a smokescreen to hide the fact that conservatives are pushing for  “the advancement of theocracy,” or as Rosenberg put it “ religious dictatorship.” Yes, because SCOTUS didn’t find an absolute right to free birth control in the Constitution, we’re headed for inquisition, forced conversions and heretic burnings, and all the other theocratic nightmares of the dark days of … 2008. 

By Jeffrey Meyer | April 1, 2014 | 2:37 PM EDT

NPR’s quiz show “Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me” is known for its unabashed liberalism so it should come as no surprise that the program would mock the Christian crafts store Hobby Lobby in the wake of their Supreme Court case.

The episode, which aired on Saturday March 29, featured guest host Mike Pesca, sports reporter for NPR, who joked that “Hobby Lobby was originally named Granny’s Prophylactic Attic.” The entire panel then proceeded to poke fun at the company for not wanting to cover two forms of birth control it views as ending life. [MP3 audio here.]

By Tim Graham | March 10, 2014 | 8:35 AM EDT

Longtime Los Angeles Times reporter-turned-business columnist Michael Hiltzik let his liberal flag fly on the front of Sunday’s Business section. The online headline was “Cultural production of ignorance provides rich field for study.”

The protagonist of this story was academic Robert Proctor of Stanford, touted as “one of the world's leading experts in agnotology, a neologism signifying the study of the cultural production of ignorance.” As examples of propagated ignorance, Hiltzik discussed thinking smoking is safe, and vaccinations are deadly, and...."fabricating" Obamacare horror stories:

By Brad Wilmouth | January 6, 2014 | 1:28 PM EST

Appearing as a guest on Friday's PoliticsNation on MSNBC, during a discussion of conservative Christians making plans to push their agenda, liberal guest Frank Schaeffer charged that Republicans have a "pathological hatred" of President Obama, asserted that the GOP's goal is to "Stop the first African-American President from succeeding at all costs," and then drew a parallel with racist opposition to school intregration decades ago.

After recounting conservative concerns about same-sex marriage, Schaeffer continued:

By Paul Bremmer | November 15, 2013 | 5:35 PM EST

The Daily Beast on Monday produced a shrill attack on the Tea Party titled “How the Tea Party’s Apocalyptic Politics Are Destroying the Republican Party.” Author Joe McLean announced his premise in the subheading: “Tea Party leaders view themselves as modern prophets of the end of times, ratcheting up their rhetoric to prove that Obama is evil and God is on their side.”

What followed was an attempt to demonize Tea Party leaders as the sort of apocalyptic prophets who most people consider crazy. McLean painted a picture of wild-eyed, dangerous right-wing fanatics through lines like this:

By Mike Bates | September 21, 2013 | 12:26 PM EDT

The September 19, 2013 article “Pope Francis: Church cannot be 'obsessed' with gays, other bans” on The Chicago Tribune’s Web site notes:

In a remarkable change from his predecessor Benedict, who said homosexuality was an intrinsic disorder, Francis said that when homosexuals told him they were always condemned by the Church and felt "socially wounded", he told them "the Church does not want to do this".

Contrary to what a typical reader might conclude, Pope Benedict wasn’t expressing a personal opinion on homosexuality.  What he said comes directly from the Catechism of the Catholic Church: