By Brad Wilmouth | February 12, 2016 | 10:49 AM EST

Appearing as a guest on Friday's New Day, liberal CNN political commentator Bob Beckel claimed that Republicans call Hispanics by the derogatory term "wetbacks" as he discussed whether Bernie Sanders will be able to win the Hispanic vote in the Nevada caucuses against Hillary Clinton. He also recalled Bill Clinton as the "first black President" as he dismissed Sanders's chances of beating Hillary Clinton with black voters in South Carolina.

By Brad Wilmouth | February 10, 2016 | 2:01 PM EST

Appearing as a guest on Wednesday's CNN Newsroom with Carol Costello, liberal CNN political commentator Marc Lamont Hill advised that Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders needs to show a "vision to combat white supremacy" and "talk to our racial pain" if  he wishes to win black voters. The Morehouse College professor also hit Hillary Clinton from the far left as he declared that "the Clintons have been terrible to black people" because of President Bill Clinton's support for the 1994 crime bill.

By Matthew Balan | February 9, 2016 | 5:16 PM EST

Roxanne Jones sang the praises of Beyonce in a Tuesday op-ed on CNN.com for her "perfectly timed, bold, Black Panther-inspired halftime tribute." Jones touted how the "pop icon used her star power to shine a light on the problem of race in America," and how the Super Bowl halftime show forwarded "a vision of an America that I aspire to live in one day." She later attacked the singer's critics for not only being "out of touch with a lot more than sports," but also being "out of touch with America. They act as if....systematic racism doesn't exist in America."

By Tom Blumer | February 9, 2016 | 2:54 PM EST

The headline at Nathaniel Friedman's Monday column at Salon.com is unmistakably clear: "Racist vitriol pours down on Cam Newton: Single-minded haters rush to judgment after a rough Super Bowl." Naturally, I went there expecting a long series of hateful tweets, social media references or other comments.

Friedman's column content, however, has no reference to "racism" at all — or to "racists," or even to "race." Perhaps the far-left website expected the writer to cover that topic, and then he didn't. Or perhaps the money-bleeding operation just wanted to put a clickbait headline out there to garner traffic. Regardless of how or why it happened, the headline's presence is irresponsible, as Friedman didn't even look at the criticism of Carolina Panthers quarterback Cam Newton's relatively poor play and post-game conduct through a racial prism at all.

By Matthew Balan | February 8, 2016 | 12:24 PM EST

Comedian Anthony Anderson mocked conservative actress Stacey Dash during his opening monologue at Friday's NAACP Image Awards: "What the hell is she doing? Doesn't she know that the Fox network is using her? She's just an Ann Coulter dipped in butterscotch. That's all she is!" Anderson added, "Baby, don't let them use you! Come back to the black people; and get back to work in some of those beautiful 'C' movies that you used to do."

By Tom Johnson | February 5, 2016 | 8:42 PM EST

Daily Kos writer Mark E Andersen makes political correctness sound healthy and utterly bland -- the ideological equivalent of plain oatmeal. “Political correctness is nothing evil,” declared Andersen in a Sunday post. “It is not a liberal plot…It is about being a decent human being—period.”

Andersen hinted that some non-decent, anti-PC human beings (i.e., conservatives) are concealing racist and sexist agendas: “Why is it that so many on the right have a problem with this? Is it because they think ‘bimbo,’ ‘nigger,’ ‘kike,’ ‘wop,’ ‘beaner,’ and other slurs are appropriate for everyday conversation?”

By Kristine Marsh | February 4, 2016 | 1:53 PM EST

Just before the filing deadline, BLM activist Deray Mckesson joined the mayoral race in Baltimore on Wednesday evening and the national media took note. Maybe that’s because Mckesson was already the media’s appointed spokesman for the Black Lives Matter movement, being featured everywhere from MSNBC to CNN  to C-Span. What should’ve been a local news story was highlighted by all the major national media outlets, from the Washington Post, to the New York Times, even NBCNews.com, proving that his run has more to do with the media’s fascination with Black Lives Matter than an interest in local politics.

 

By Matthew Balan | February 3, 2016 | 1:24 PM EST

On Tuesday's America With Jorge Ramos, Fusion's Nando Vila advanced the left-wing cause of reparations to the descendants of slaves. Vila asserted "the moral case for reparations is a clear one. Black people are 16 times poorer than white people, because white people have systematically stolen wealth from black people for hundreds of years — through slavery, Jim Crow, housing discrimination, and various other crimes." He later suggested that one way to pay reparations would be to "pull it from elsewhere in the budget...like our excessive defense spending."

By Clay Waters | February 1, 2016 | 8:34 AM EST

New York Times sportswriter William Rhoden jumped on the latest leftist bandwagon on Sunday, heartily supporting controversial comments by the Super Bowl-bound Carolina Panthers quarterback Cam Newton. Newton was quoted in the Charlotte Observer accusing critics of his showboating post-touchdown antics of being racist. It’s been twenty-eight years since Doug Williams became the first black quarterback to start a Super Bowl. Newton will be the sixth. Talented as he is, he’s not breaking any barriers or shocking anyone. But Rhoden took the complaint to heart and found it the most compelling storyline of next Sunday’s Super Bowl, pumping up Newton’s social justice brand into the next Muhammad Ali in “Dancing Around End Zones, Not Around Matters of Racism.”

By Tom Blumer | January 31, 2016 | 11:45 AM EST

Those in the press who have insisted that the "Ferguson effect" is an urban legend will have a hard time explaining why the two cities with the most potential to be affected by this supposedly mythical phenomenon now have murder rates among the top 20 in the entire world.

St. Louis, Missouri, next door to Ferguson, where a leftist-"inspired" campaign of "protests," civil disorder and rioting began in August 2014, came in at Number 15, with a rate of 59 murders per 100,000 residents. The city's 188 murders in 2015 were up from 159 in 2014 and 120 in 2013. Baltimore, Maryland, where Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake infamously admitted in April 2015, as public safety was deteriorating in her city, that "we also gave those who wished to destroy space to do that," was Number 19, with 344 murders (a rate of 55 per 100,000).

By Tom Johnson | January 29, 2016 | 9:25 PM EST

E.J. Dionne, the liberal Washington Post columnist, and Garry Wills, the author, scholar, and ex-conservative, disagree on whether the “hard right” has more or less permanent control of the Republican party. Dionne believes that so-called reform conservatives such as Ross Douthat, Ramesh Ponnuru, and David Frum might, in Wills’ words, “ride to the rescue.”

On the other hand, Wills, assessing Dionne’s Why the Right Went Wrong: Conservatism – From Goldwater to the Tea Party and Beyond in the February 11 issue of the New York Review of Books, contends that the GOP is solidly in the grip of movement conservatives who tend towards paranoia (“to be on the right is to feel perpetually betrayed”); hostility to “reason, facts, science, open-mindedness, tolerance, secularity, modernity”; and indulgence of racism.

By Mark Finkelstein | January 26, 2016 | 7:58 PM EST

Imagine that in some future presidential election, two Mexican-American candidates are vying for the Dem nomination. The Dem frontrunner announces he won't participate in the next debate. And a conservative pundit sneeringly says "who's going to watch a debate between the two Mexican guys?" Now imagine all hell descending on that hapless conservative for his breach of political correctness.

Will anything similar befall Chris Matthews? Of course not. But on Hardball this evening, as news was breaking that Donald Trump won't participate in Thursday's debate in protest over Megyn Kelly's presence on the panel, Matthews said "who's going to watch a debate between the two Cuban guys?"