Racism

By Ann Coulter | August 8, 2013 | 6:16 PM EDT

After attacking Bill O'Reilly's history last week, I'll defend his sociology this week. On Monday, MSNBC's Lawrence O'Donnell ridiculed Fox News' O'Reilly for saying that single motherhood is responsible for the the high black crime rate.

O'Reilly said, quite correctly: "The reason there is so much violence and chaos in the black precincts is the disintegration of the African-American family. Right now, about 73 percent of all black babies are born out of wedlock. That drives poverty. And the lack of involved fathers leads to young boys growing up resentful and unsupervised. And it has nothing to do with slavery. It has everything to do with you Hollywood people and you derelict parents."

By Noel Sheppard | August 7, 2013 | 4:17 PM EDT

Senator Rand Paul (R-Ky.) had quite a testy exchange with CNBC’s John Harwood Tuesday.

Appearing on NPR’s On Point, Paul eventually told the substitute host, “Don't you have something better to read than a bunch of crap from people who don't like me? I mean, that won’t make for much of an interview if I have to sit through, you know, reading after recitation of people calling me a racist” (video follows with transcript and commentary):

By Noel Sheppard | August 5, 2013 | 12:04 PM EDT

Oprah Winfrey on Monday said the killings of Trayvon Martin and Emmett Till are the "same thing."

This transpired during an interview with The Grio that aired on NBC's Today show (video follows with transcript and commentary):

By Noel Sheppard | August 3, 2013 | 4:25 PM EDT

As NewsBusters has often reported, the folks at MSNBC have a disturbing habit of deceptively editing videos to radically change their meaning.

Maybe that's where MSNBC's Toure Neblett learned this, for on Friday, he dramatically edited a Magic Johnson tweet about Philadelphia Eagles wide receiver Riley Cooper:

By Brad Wilmouth | August 2, 2013 | 1:40 PM EDT

Appearing on Thursday's PoliticsNation, MSNBC's Krystal Ball accused conservative talk radio host Rush Limbaugh of "racism" and "sexism" and charged that "He is offensive in every way you can be offensive."

Host Al Sharpton had introduced the segment by marking the 25th anniversary of Limbaugh's nationally syndicated radio show, and, after offering congratulations, then launched into complaints:

By Noel Sheppard | August 2, 2013 | 11:44 AM EDT

So much for that post-racial society we were promised if Barack Obama became the first black president.

Seth MacFarlane has a new sitcom coming to Fox this fall apparently filled with lots of racial jokes...all directed at white men, of course.

By Walter E. Williams | August 1, 2013 | 6:37 PM EDT

If we put ourselves into the shoes of racists who seek to sabotage black upward mobility, we couldn't develop a more effective agenda than that followed by civil rights organizations, black politicians, academics, liberals and the news media. Let's look at it.

First, weaken the black family, but don't blame it on individual choices. You have to preach that today's weak black family is a legacy of slavery, Jim Crow and racism. The truth is that black female-headed households were just 18 percent of households in 1950, as opposed to about 68 percent today. In fact, from 1890 to 1940, the black marriage rate was slightly higher than that of whites. Even during slavery, when marriage was forbidden for blacks, most black children lived in biological two-parent families. In New York City, in 1925, 85 percent of black households were two-parent households. A study of 1880 family structure in Philadelphia shows that three-quarters of black families were two-parent households.

By Brad Wilmouth | August 1, 2013 | 6:36 PM EDT

On Wednesday's PoliticsNation, MSNBC host Al Sharpton not only accused FNC's Bill O'Reilly and other right-leaning hosts of "distorting" the actions of Democrats on the issue of racial "grievance," but the MSNBC host for the third time in the past couple of weeks recounted and distorted comments O'Reilly made in September 2007 about his trip to a predominantly black restaurant in Harlem.

MSNBC contributor Goldie Taylor compared O'Reilly to 1960s segregationist Lester Maddox, a Democratic governor of Georgia known for trying to undermine the Civil Rights Movement.

Sharpton recounted that President Obama and other Democrats are trying to have a "serious conversation about race," playing several clips, and then turned to complaining about reaction from O'Reilly and other right-leaning figures:

By Ken Shepherd | August 1, 2013 | 12:58 PM EDT

"A Hoodie. A Symbol. A Museum Piece? What will become of Trayvon Martin's sweatshirt, the latest piece of trial evidence to capture the public's fascination?" That's how the editors of the Washington Post-owned free tabloid Express grabbed the eyeballs of Washington Metrorail riders this morning.

Manuel Roig-Franzia's cover story on page 12 -- "Iconic Evidence Has Unclear Fate: Supporters view Trayvon Martin's hoodie as more than a trial artifact" -- seems to be spun off from a July 31 Post Style section front-pager, "Where's the Evidence," which looked more broadly at "iconic exhibits" of evidence in high-profile trials such as the infamous glove in the O.J. Simpson murder trial or the Bushmaster rifle used by D.C. snipers John Allen Muhammad and Lee Boyd Malvo. But the closing paragraphs of Roig-Franzia's Express piece chiefly served as a vehicle for MSNBC host the Rev. Al Sharpton to promote his designs on Trayvon's hoodie, not to mention Sharpton's insistence that Martin is the Emmett Till of the millennial generation (emphasis mine):

By Joe Newby | July 31, 2013 | 9:49 PM EDT

It seems that when there’s a good liberal narrative to be advanced, facts and actual history don’t matter.

That was apparently the case when Oprah Winfrey claimed that the “n-word” was the last thing heard by “millions” who were lynched. The implication is clear — millions of blacks have been lynched because of their race. Worse yet, Parade Magazine let Winfrey get away with her “fact” unchallenged.

By Ann Coulter | July 31, 2013 | 6:55 PM EDT

Does anyone read anymore? I mean, besides tweets from Anthony Weiner?

During his otherwise excellent commentaries on race in America, Bill O'Reilly, host of the No. 1 cable news show, claimed on Tuesday night that the one person who tried to help African-Americans more than any other was ... Robert F. Kennedy! No one laughed. I guess that's what they're teaching these days at the John F. Kennedy School of Government. (I can't wait to hear how Ted Kennedy helped eradicate drunk driving!)

By Tom Blumer | July 30, 2013 | 11:57 PM EDT

Those who falsely smear the other side in an attempt to make an argument tend to do so because they have run out of real ones. It would appear that the New Haven Register's argument cupboard is completely barren of everything but poisonous rhetoric.

In an opinion piece which I can hardly believe is a house editorial, the Register characterizes Ann Coulter, Fox News, the Republican Party, anyone who thinks George Zimmerman really was innocent, Ted Nugent, and Toad's Place, the venue where Nugent is playing next week, as among those who have "embraced" the "same basic message that the KKK has promoted for 148 years." Tellingly, the paper turns on many of its readers, adding "a burgeoning array of fringe 'conservative' media and members of our own community commenting on stories on the New Haven Register’s website" to the KKK-sympathetic cadre. Brace yourself for what follows after the jump, and ask yourself why any person of genuine good will -- left, right, or middle -- would willingly support a publication such as this.