Racism

By Matt Hadro | July 22, 2013 | 6:13 PM EDT

CNN anchor Don Lemon lectured conservative radio host Ben Ferguson for being quick to pan President Obama's Friday address on race, during Saturday's 4 p.m. ET hour of Newsroom.

Lemon -- who has played the race card by twice comparing traditional marriage supporters to segregationists -- told Ferguson that since he's white, he has a "place of privilege" that minorities don't have and therefore can't fully understand the plight of black people in America.

By Brad Wilmouth | July 22, 2013 | 6:00 PM EDT

As MSNBC's Melissa Harris-Perry made multiple appearances on Friday's MSNBC evening shows to discuss President Obama's surprise statement on the George Zimmerman acquittal, the MSNBC host declared that, after Obama became President, "every move that he made became where he ended up carrying the burden of race," during her appearance on All in with Chris Hayes.

A couple of hours earlier, as she appeared on PoliticsNation, Harris-Perry drew a parallel to the views of former confederates in the 1870s and those in modern times who dismiss liberal preocupation with racial issues. Harris-Perry:

By David Limbaugh | July 22, 2013 | 5:54 PM EDT

It seems to me that almost every time President Obama talks publicly about race, he stirs things up rather than calms them down. Whether intentional or not, it's unfortunate — and damaging.

It's difficult to express opinions on race that don't conform to the politically correct narrative, because race baiters are always lying in wait to denounce as a bigot anyone who dissents from their assessment. Indeed, many leftists who call for a national dialogue on race routinely brand conservatives as racists — merely because they are conservative — even when they remain silent on racially sensitive issues.

By Matt Vespa | July 22, 2013 | 5:32 PM EDT

The July 19 broadcast of ABC’s “What Would You Do?” at first seemed to be devoid of any racial themes that usually plague the overly-contrived ABC "News" show.  Yet, they needed to insert a racial element to see if bystanders would stop a would-be thief in broad daylight. A man named Uvall is an actor playing your everyday American commuting to work.  He parks his car along the front of New York Panini in Huntington, New York.  His car has over $10,000 in valuables, which Kevin, another actor who happens to be a white guy will try to steal. He’s mostly successful.  Yet, he’s stopped by a naval officer -- a real person, not an actor -- and placed under a citizen’s arrest. Nevertheless, ABC had to play the race game to see if there’s more to Kevin’s success.

During the second go-around in this scenario, Gabriel replaces Kevin.  He’s another actor, and he happens to be black.  He’s caught every time, and also placed under citizen’s arrest.  Yet, is this racism, or more perceptive bystanders, the folks at ABC ask?

By Jeffrey Meyer | July 22, 2013 | 11:19 AM EDT

One would think that a lawyer like Joe Scarborough would refrain himself from making irresponsible statements surrounding the Trayvon Martin case. Unfortunately, it appears as though MSNBC’s pseudo-conservative is incapable of being reasonable, suggesting that in the wake of Trayvon Martin’s death, white potheads are fair game for murder.

Appearing on the July 22 Morning Joe, Scarborough ranted against what he called, “really racially intolerant comments that we've been hearing from across the political spectrum” which to most rational people would bring to mind Scarborough's colleague Al Sharpton. Instead, Scarborough was referring to Sean Hannity. [See video after jump. MP3 audio here.]

By Tom Blumer | July 22, 2013 | 11:06 AM EDT

Update, July 24: In audio found here at my home blog, Zimmerman attorney Mark O'Mara, in a Tuesday discussion with New York talk show host Steve Malzberg, confirmed the accuracy of the "iced tea myth"-related details in this post and in Bill Whittle's video.

Among the more outrageous aspects of the press's negligent coverage of the circumstances surrounding the Trayvon Martin-George Zimmerman confrontation is its insistence on describing Martin as having bought "Skittles and iced tea" at a convenience store roughly 40 minutes before Zimmerman, as a neighborhood watch volunteer, spotted him.

The drink was not "iced tea." It has been known that the drink wasn't iced tea for well over a year. Yet at least seven press reports since the verdict, up to and including coverage of this past weekend's demonstrations (examples here and here, at the Associated Press the day after the verdict; here; here; here; here; and here), identified "iced tea" as what Martin purchased. The actual identity of the non-caffeinated drink, AriZona Watermelon Fruit Juice Cocktail -- which appears not to contain a single drop of tea, and which the company has in its "juice drinks" category -- is extremely significant, as will be explained after the jump.

By Tom Blumer | July 21, 2013 | 6:22 PM EDT

The TalkLeft blog noted last night that the American Civil Liberties Union, after encouraging U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder to pursue civil rights charges against George Zimmerman the day after he was acquitted in the death of Trayvon Martin, reversed course just four days later.

Though it's no longer available at its national web site, the Associated Press ran the organization's press release. Various searches at the AP's national web site indicate that there has been no coverage of the organization's reversal. Several center-right blogs have noted the reversal, but no one in the establishment press besides Josh Gerstein at the Politico, where stories the rest of the establishment press would prefer to ignore tend to go and all too often die, has noted it. So did the organization have a change of heart? Or did it attempt to manipulate its media exposure with a politically correct initial press release followed by a legally and constitutionally correct reversal it hopes few will notice?

By Noel Sheppard | July 21, 2013 | 2:25 PM EDT

As NewsBusters has been reporting, the Obama-loving media's gushing and fawning over the President's address Friday concerning race and the George Zimmerman verdict has been nothing less than sick-making.

Potentially the most vomitous remark yet came from New York Times columnist David Brooks who actually said on NBC's Meet the Press Sunday - with a straight face, no less! - it "was a symphony" (video follows with transcript and commentary):

By Noel Sheppard | July 21, 2013 | 12:51 PM EDT

Unlike most of the Obama-loving media, PBS's Tavis Smiley has been deeply critical of the President's comments Friday regarding race and the George Zimmerman verdict.

Smiley continued his criticism on NBC's Meet the Press Sunday saying, "I don't know how he argues he can't lead us in a conversation on this, but he can on gay marriage?" (video follows with transcript and commentary):

By Noel Sheppard | July 20, 2013 | 6:01 PM EDT

Jay-Z and Justin Timberlake dedicated a song to Trayvon Martin during their concert at Yankee Stadium Friday night.

In a video captured by a member of the audience, as the couple began their last song of the evening - "Forever Young" - Jay-Z yelled to the crowd, "Everybody put a cell phone and light it up. Let's light the sky for Trayvon Martin tonight in here":

By Noel Sheppard | July 20, 2013 | 3:36 PM EDT

Kicking off a day of nationwide protests of the George Zimmerman verdict, hip-hop stars Beyonce and Jay-Z joined Al Sharpton and Trayvon Martin's mother at a rally in Harlem Saturday.

The New York Post reported:

By Noel Sheppard | July 20, 2013 | 2:39 PM EDT

Syndicated columnist Pat Buchanan had some harsh words for Barack Obama’s address Friday concerning race and the George Zimmerman verdict.

Appearing on PBS’s McLaughlin Group, Buchanan said Obama’s comments were “insidious” adding, “The President has taken sides in what is becoming unfortunately a pretty nasty racial dispute in this country.”