Racism

By NB Staff | May 23, 2014 | 5:00 PM EDT

When you've saved countless lives with painstaking precision in long, intense hours of neurosurgery, being outnumbered three-to-one in a political discussion on cable TV is a piece of cake. Dr. Ben Carson appeared live in studio on the May 22 edition of MSNBC's All In with Chris Hayes with the program's host and liberal think-tank president Heather McGhee. Newly-minted MSNBC host José Díaz-Balart rounded out the panel, appearing via satellite. 

Carson was on the program in part to plug his new book, One Nation, and was asked by Hayes to defend his thoughts on how liberals exploit racial categorizations to divide Americans. Carson noted that his experience as a neurosurgeon has enforced his colorblind view of the world [watch the segment by clicking play on the embed below the page break]:

By Tom Blumer | May 21, 2014 | 9:03 PM EDT

At a website called Girard at Large in Manchester, New Hampshire, proprietor Richard Girard videotaped and reported on the proceedings of a debate held at St. Anselm's College on the Common Core educational standards — something you'll almost never see anyone in the establishment press deign to do.

Girard appropriately described proponents' descriptions of and arguments in favor of the standards "revealing," "enlightening," and "well, frightening." Perhaps no statement made during the two-hour event Monday contained more of all three adjectives than one made by Dr. David Pook, a teacher at The Derryfield School in Manchester, about what motivated him to get involved with having input into the English Language Arts standards. Brace yourself (HT BizPac Review; specific audio segment is at this link; bolds are mine throughout this post; May 22 Update: Mr. Pook's comment was slightly revised at the original link for accuracy; that revision is now reflected below):

By Lillian Bozzone | May 21, 2014 | 12:19 PM EDT

A darling of the lefty entertainment establishment has taken a prosthetic nose dive into hot water. At Macklemore’s May 16 Seattle performance at the opening of “Spectacle: The Music Video,” the rapper lionized for his pro-gay stance appeared on stage in a stereotypical Jewish costume, singing his hit, “Thrift Shop.”

Bad move for a guy celebrated for injecting “tolerance and acceptance and equal rights” into hip hop.

By Tom Blumer | May 20, 2014 | 3:09 PM EDT

If there was ever drop-dead obvious proof that it's more than fair to call the Associated Press the Administration's Press, it's in the opening phrase of the first sentence of the wire service's Monday morning report on the House's select committee on Benghazi: "Republicans hoping to ride their Benghazi investigation to a November election sweep ..." As far as reporters Donna Cassata and Bradley Klapper are concerned, there can't possibly be any other motivation for holding the hearings.

Cassata and Klapper's agenda-driven drivel makes several trips into the land of "Republicans say," when the correct words should be: "The facts are." More crucially, Klapper completely ignored two reports he filed on October 10, 2012 which showed that the State Department "never believed" that the murder of Christopher Stevens and three other Americans in the Benghazi attack was inspired by an anti-Muslim video (bolds numbered tags are mine throughout this post):

By Tom Johnson | May 15, 2014 | 10:59 PM EDT
By Tim Graham | May 15, 2014 | 9:34 PM EDT

You can guess you’re on the NPR website – and the “Code Switch” race-matters blog – when an article on ice-cream trucks comes with an editor’s warning: “This article is about a virulently racist song. Read no further if you wish to avoid racist imagery and slurs.”

Some trucks apparently play the well-known melody “Turkey In the Straw,” and Theodore R. Johnson III blamed "a great many" ice cream trucks for playing a melody apparently popularized by a blackface song named “Zip Coon” and a horrid 1916 ditty titled “"Ni--er Love A Watermelon Ha! Ha! Ha!"

By Matthew Balan | May 14, 2014 | 4:04 PM EDT

Tauriq Moosa slammed Nintendo in a Monday item for The Daily Beast for supposedly perpetuating "anti-gay bigotry." The writer singled out the Japanese video game company for rejecting same-sex relationships as an option in its "life simulator" game Tomodachi Life, and lamented that its decision "has a huge effect on creative media, on culture, and thus people themselves."

Moosa used the Nintendo controversy as a jumping off to hammer the video game industry in general for its apparent negative attitudes towards homosexuals and women:

By Jack Coleman | May 13, 2014 | 7:07 PM EDT

Ed Schultz briefly revealed what he actually thinks on his radio show yesterday, then quickly retreated to the comforting confines of the nonsensical.

Schultz was talking about embattled Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling and his interview with Anderson Cooper of CBS about racist remarks made by Sterling and recorded by a gold-digger girlfriend working for him as an "archivist." (Audio after the jump)

By Brad Wilmouth | May 11, 2014 | 3:39 PM EDT

Appearing as a guest on the Saturday edition of Disrupt with Karen Finney on MSNBC, former NBC News man and New York Times columnist Bob Herbert asserted that Republicans are "hostile to the interests of African-Americans" and suggested that Kentucky Senator Rand Paul would not have a problem with a hotel or restaurant barring black customers from entering.

Herbert's comments came during a discussion of Senator Paul's recent criticism of GOP efforts to change voting laws. [See video below.] 

By Matthew Balan | May 10, 2014 | 4:45 PM EDT

Chris Matthews mocked Republicans on Friday's Hardball over their hawkish stance towards Boko Haram, the Nigerian Islamist group that recently kidnapped hundreds of girls. Matthews made a thinly-veiled racial attack on the GOP during a panel discussion on the terrorist organization: "By the way, when did the Republican Party take this keen interest in Africa? I may have missed that one."

Guest Michelle Bernard, who is of Jamaican decent, quickly followed the MSNBC host with a more overt racially-based jab at Republicans: [MP3 audio available here; video below the jump]

By Mario Díaz | May 8, 2014 | 5:25 PM EDT

"George W. Bush is a racist."  Those where the first words I heard about modern American politics when I came here to study back in 2000.  How did my friends know?  Well, he was the Republican candidate.  I wouldn’t want to be associated with someone like that, so I became a Democrat. 

That scenario is not uncommon.  That is how a large number of Hispanics get their feet wet in American politics.  Conservatives are against other races, other countries and the poor, aren’t they?  That general view of distrust for those racist southern conservatives is reinforced constantly in the media.  Not that they are all racists, but everyone knows about that elusive “racist element” discussed all day on MSNBC and every day in the pages of the New York Times.  The same narrative is showcased on Univision and in Hispanic newspapers all over the country. 

By Ken Oliver-Méndez | May 2, 2014 | 10:45 AM EDT

Much like their English-language counterparts, the flagship evening news programs of the Univision and Telemundo television networks found plenty of time to cover the scandal over racism that rocked Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling, but no time to devote to news developments which cast President Obama and his administration in a negative light.

Over the course of four days between April 28 and May 1, Noticiero Univision and Noticiero Telemundo dedicated 16 minutes and 33 seconds of airtime to Donald Sterling and the future of the Los Angeles basketball franchise, but evidently didn’t consider the President’s worse-ever popularity poll numbers, the sharp decline in U.S. economic growth, Secretary of State John Kerry’s ill-considered remarks against Israel or fresh, incriminating White House emails twisting the facts about the attack against the U.S. consulate in Benghazi to be worth even a single second of news coverage.