Poverty

By Tom Blumer | February 10, 2014 | 6:21 PM EST

A heated discussion between Fox News's Bill O'Reilly and Geraldo Rivera on Friday exemplifies two important points.

The first and most obvious is that the kind of discussion seen in the video segment which follows would rarely happen on Fox's cable competitors — yet it's Fox which the establishment press usually describes as biased to the right, while giving CNN and occassionally even MSNBC a pass. Second, Geraldo's position on O'Reilly's aggressive interview — which was, in essence, "How dare you!" — is a commonly held view on the left, whose representatives and reporters would never have had a problem with anyone using the same style with George W. Bush or any other Republican or conservative president. The video and key quotes from the segment follow the jump.

By Jeffrey Meyer | February 2, 2014 | 12:41 PM EST

George Stephanopoulos must be spending too much of his free time watching MSNBC as he used their talking points to attack Congressman Paul Ryan (R-WI) during an interview on This Week on February 2. 

The Republican congressman appeared with the ABC host and former Press Secretary for President Bill Clinton on Sunday morning and was immediately hit with a barrage of attacks over his opposition to President Obama’s use of executive orders to his views on poverty. Stephanopoulos went so far as to suggest that Pope Francis would reject Paul’s conservative philosophy and claimed that, “You don't think he'd endorse your budget, do you?

By Paul Bremmer | January 30, 2014 | 6:00 PM EST

For some liberals in the media, working to ensure equality of  opportunity just isn’t enough. They want to see every American achieve an equal outcome and government have an active role in redistribution of wealth.

Matthew Yglesias, business and economics correspondent at Slate, made such a contention in a Thursday article titled “Sorry, Equal Opportunity Isn’t Good Enough.”

By Tom Blumer | January 15, 2014 | 12:58 PM EST

Before anyone seeks to level a criticism for picking on someone's mistake, let's imagine what the press, which is so desperate to pin anything on Ted Cruz that one of its members recently tried to hold him responsible for others' comments on his Facebook page, would do to him if he made the error recently elected New Jersey Senator Cory Booker made two days ago on Twitter — and has yet to correct.

Booker was apparently taken aback when he read a USA Today story about how U.S. students' performance compares to those in Finland. One segment of Oliver Thomas's writeup noted that "in Finland, the child poverty rate is about 5%. In the U.S., the rate is almost five times as high." That prompted an outraged Booker — a graduate of Stanford and Yale Law School, and a Rhodes scholar — to tweet the following (HT Twitchy):

By Jeffrey Meyer | January 7, 2014 | 5:28 PM EST

It should come as no surprise that when Republicans don’t support liberal polices such as raising the minimum wage, expanding Medicaid or extending food stamp benefits that MSNBC will slander them as heartless and compassionless. That was the basic message during a segment on January 8 between fill-in host Richard Lui and NBC News Senior Political Editor Mark Murray.

The segment began with Lui hyping a NBC News “First Read” piece discussing how the GOP needs to close its “empathy gap” with Democrats and essentially support liberal policies in order to do so. Mark Murray began his analysis by claiming that, “2013 wasn't a really good year for the Republican Party delivering on what that RNC after-election autopsy recommended.” [See video after jump.]

By Brad Wilmouth | December 27, 2013 | 12:23 PM EST

On Thursday's PoliticsNation on MSNBC, during a discussion of Republican resistance to extending unemployment benefits, MSNBC political analyst Goldie Taylor charged that the  GOP "almost single-handedly blew up this economy," and that it was "as if" they "blew up" the "bridge" and then "dared people to cross to the other side of the canyon on their own."

After host Al Sharpton played several soundbites of Republican elected officials and complained that they "act as though" the unemployed are "dependents, that they're some kind of beggars," he turned to Taylor who responded:

By Brad Wilmouth | December 20, 2013 | 6:35 PM EST

On Thursday's All In show, MSNBC's Chris Hayes repeatedly used words like "screwing over" to describe Republican policies toward the poor, and claimed that Tea Partiers in Congress believe in "poverty as punishment" as he fretted over a delay in the extension of unemployment benefits and then hyped Georgia Republican Rep. Jack Kingston's suggestion that school children do chores in exchange for subsidized lunches.

After characterizing recent statements by congressional Republicans as being like immaturely declaring, "Yeah, and your mother," the MSNBC host a bit later whined:

By Brad Wilmouth | December 12, 2013 | 2:26 PM EST

Appearing as a guest on Wednesday's All In with Chris Hayes on MSNBC, the Daily Beast's Michelle Goldberg praised Pope Francis as a "voice against the tyranny or the hegemony of global capitalism" during a discussion of whether the Pope should be chosen Time's "Person of the Year." Goldberg:

By Brad Wilmouth | December 4, 2013 | 2:37 PM EST

On Tuesday's PoliticsNation on MSNBC, as host Al Sharpton went after FNC host Bill O'Reilly for metaphorically complaining about a "war on Christmas" by liberals who have worked to water down the Christian holiday's public presence, Washington Post columnist Dana Milbank took his own jabs at O'Reilly and Republicans.

After Sharpton opined that "I think the right just doesn't like the idea of a changing in America," Milbank began:

By Paul Bremmer | November 26, 2013 | 1:44 PM EST

MSNBC took advantage of a golden opportunity to advocate its left-wing agenda on Sunday’s Weekends with Alex Witt. The host brought on Derek Thompson of The Atlantic to discuss the piece he wrote about a recent study on the cognitive effects of poverty. In a nutshell, the study found that being poor can actually lead to bad decision-making.

Naturally, Witt took this study as a chance to tout the welfare state and take a swipe at lawmakers who want to slow its growth. She asked Thompson:

By Mark Finkelstein | October 22, 2013 | 9:18 AM EDT

For all his accomplishments, Henry Louis Gates might be doomed to being best remembered as the man whose arrest led to the "Beer Summit." But the Harvard prof had something surprising to say on today's Morning Joe: Gates questioned the need for affirmative action for affluent African-Americans, saying instead such programs should seek to help poor people, regardless of race.

Gates made the personal political, citing the case of his own two daughters, whom Gates described as having a "privileged" life."Do they really need to benefit from affirmative action?", asked Gates rhetorically.  View the video after the jump.

By Brent Bozell | September 24, 2013 | 11:14 PM EDT

Why are liberals in so much denial about liberal bias in the news? Why do they think they’re bending over backward to be “objective” doing that which Republicans see as partisan activism?

Daniel Froomkin of the Huffington Post – formerly of The Washington Post – suggests an answer. He is exactly the kind of liberal agitator in the newsroom who wants every news story to be a blazing editorial. Every reporter must divide the world clearly between Liberal Sense and Conservative Nonsense. His latest article is titled “Writing a Neutral Story About Something So Heartless As the Food Stamp Vote Is Not Good Journalism.”