By Tom Blumer | April 28, 2016 | 11:09 PM EDT

The editorialists at Investor's Business Daily have reported on the results of an important study by several George Mason University Mercatus Center economists showing what regulations have cost the economy in economic growth since 1980. The establishment press, which has been singularly uninterested in reporting anything that has to potential to slow the regulatory leviathan down — y'know, because its causes are so noble and righteous — is virtually ignoring the Mercatus study.

IBD tied the study's findings into the "new normal" nonsense the "mainstream" economics community and most of the business press has been foisting on us since it became obvious about 6-1/2 years ago that the U.S. economy's post-recession performance would likely be singularly underwhelming. What we've seen is the worst growth post-downturn economy by far since World War II.

By Tom Blumer | April 25, 2016 | 11:24 PM EDT

State Department spokesman John Kirby did a fist-pounding imitation of Baghdad Bob at a press conference today on the Obama administration's decision "to send 250 more troops to Syria."

Note that the Associated Press report by Kathleen Hennessey linked in the first paragraph refers to "troops," not "advisers" or "trainers." This is important, because that AP report acknowledges that in everyday parlance, the additional forces involved are "boots on the ground." The AP's Matt Lee, one of the few genuine journalists at the wire service, had to endure hearing Kirby say that the administration wasn't changing course or breaking a previous promise. Lee didn't take it well, nor should he have (HT Washington Free Beacon):

By Tom Blumer | April 24, 2016 | 11:54 PM EDT

In a Fox News Sunday interview so painful to watch readers are advised to consider taking headache medicine before viewing, Democratic National Committee Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz tried to make the case that the FBI investigation into Hillary Clinton's handling of emails containing sensitive and classified national security information and her use of an undisclosed private email server is a "distraction," and that the idea of even raising it as a campaign issue is "ludicrous."

Show host Chris Wallace was particularly perturbed when the DNC chair claimed that Mrs. Clinton was "using private e-mail in the same way that previous secretaries of state have," and forced her to admit, "Other than the private server":

By Tom Blumer | April 24, 2016 | 4:44 PM EDT

Things must be getting grim on the Obamacare front if the Obama administration feels it must send "Zeke the Bleak" Emanuel out to defend it.

Though he was on relatively good behavior compared to previous interviews he has given, Emanuel, rather than visibly losing his cool, kept on using Stuart Varney's first name in his responses during a Fox Business interview this week to the point where it nearly came off as an attempt at parent-child condescension.

By Tom Blumer | April 22, 2016 | 11:59 PM EDT

Americans For Prosperity won a huge court victory in California Thursday against that state's hard-left vindictive attorney general, Kamala Harris. Naturally, the national press is doing what it does when it doesn't want to cover a story: letting the Politico cover it and then pretending that this suffices.

Harris demanded that AFP provides the section of its not-for-profit Federal Form 990 identifying its donors. Anyone with an ounce of sense knows, despite Harris's lip service to confidentiality, that her motivation is to have the names leak out so that donors are subject to the kind of public intimidation to which those who supported the pro-traditional marriage Proposition 8 in California were subjected in 2008. Judge Manuel L. Real in the California District Federal Court forcefully denied that demand (HT Powerline). Deceptive headlines at two of the state's largest newspapers betrayed clear displeasure with the result.

By Tom Blumer | April 21, 2016 | 9:18 PM EDT

As the Washington Free Beacon reported today (confirmed here in a chart published two weeks ago), the number of Americans enrolled in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), traditionally known as Food Stamps, dropped below 45 million for the first time in almost five years (actually, 57 months) in January.

This is hardly cause for cheer, and does nothing to change the fact that in the vast majority of states, the Food Stamp program has been fundamentally transformed during the past eight years into a guaranteed income program. But to former longtime Washington Post reporter Eric Pianin, who has toiled at The Fiscal Times web site during the past six years, it was cause to go after House-led budget "cuts" and efforts at structural reform in an April 14 report riddled with laziness, errors and bias.

By Tom Blumer | April 20, 2016 | 8:46 PM EDT

Three important things happened at Tuesday's hearing of the House Judiciary Committee's Subcommittee on Immigration and Border Security.

The first was the testimony of two mothers of children killed by illegal immigrants. The second was the outrageous and false contention by a Methodist bishop that the mere act of bringing attention to these heinous offenses is a form of "blind vengeance" over "isolated ... incidents." (In other words, it is our moral duty to shut up.) The third explains why very few Americans have no idea that the first two items occurred, namely that the establishment press, consistent with its practice since Republicans took over the House of Representative in early 2011, chose not to cover what happened at yet another congressional hearing.

By Tom Blumer | April 15, 2016 | 1:46 PM EDT

For better or worse, the press, Wall Street and others routinely place a great deal of faith in the federal government's payroll employment estimates.

But when Republican Governor Rick Scott's supporters cited data from Uncle Sam's Bureau of Labor Statistics to defend him against an insufferably rude leftist who started screaming and cursing at him in a Starbucks coffee shop, Associated Press reporters Jason Dearen and Gary Fineout, in a story the wire service carried nationally, claimed that Scott could only "allege that thousands of new jobs" were created in the Gainesville area, even though the claim was based on the same data the press routinely accepts as gospel

By Tom Blumer | April 13, 2016 | 11:45 AM EDT

Today's report from the government on retail sales was awful — "unexpectedly" so, according to both Bloomberg and Reuters. Following on the heels of a 0.4 percent seasonally adjusted decline in January and a flat February, March sales fell by 0.3 percent.

Two of the three main U.S. business wire services blamed the American people, not the worst post-recession economy since World War II during the Obama administration — an economy which is clearly weakening even further — for these results.

By Tom Blumer | April 10, 2016 | 11:55 PM EDT

On Tuesday, shortly after Governor Jerry Brown signed California's $15-an-hour minimum wage legislation, the Associated Press's Michael R. Blood and Don Thompson called the move "a victory for those struggling on the margins of the economy and the politically powerful unions that pushed it."

As seen in a NewsBusters post on March 31, it's definitely a win for union members whose wages are set at a multiple of the state's minimum wage. But it's not a "victory" for "struggling" workers who will lose their jobs or not be able to become employed at the higher rate. The AP pair would only concede that "the overall goal of helping the working poor might be lessened if some employers cut jobs or, worse, leave the state." Forget the "if" on employers cutting jobs, guys. That's because, as Jeb Graham at Investor's Business Daily reported on Friday (HT Hot Air), two states which have only raised their minimums to just over $10 have already seen seasonally adjusted job losses (bolds are mine):

By Tom Blumer | April 6, 2016 | 6:40 PM EDT

On Sunday, I noted how USA Today, the Associated Press, and the establishment press in general have swallowed the Obama administration's line that the 61 convicted and incarcerated criminals whose sentences the President commuted last Thursday were "low-level inmates" guilty of "low-level drug offenses." A spreadsheet working only from the information the White House provided demonstrates that this characterization was largely bogus.

Over at the Heritage Foundation's Daily Signal on Monday, Leah Jessen provided more damning detail about the certain of these criminals' "low-level" offenses — details which almost certainly won't be reported at national establishment press outlets (bolds are mine throughout this post):

By Tom Blumer | April 3, 2016 | 5:56 PM EDT

The antennae went up when I saw the following tease on the front page of Thursday's USA Today print edition: "Obama commutes sentences for 61 low-level inmates." The brief description which immediately followed told readers that "He has cut sentences for 248 so far, more than (the) previous 6 presidents combined, official says."

Hmm. What's a "low-level inmate"? The underlying Page 3A article by David Jackson (posted in slightly revised form Wednesday evening at the paper's web site) tells us that it's someone who has committed "low-level drug offenses." The list of commutations published by the White House identifies the supposedly puny "low-level offenses" the recipients of the President's commutations committed. Here's a hint: The average person won't agree with the "low-level" characterization.