By Tom Blumer | September 11, 2016 | 5:30 PM EDT

Apparently just arriving after over a year spent in a virtually news-free, hermetically sealed cave, New York Times reporter Matt Flegenheimer pretended that former President Bill Clinton has, until he recently began complaining about the treatment of the Clinton Foundation, had "more than a year of uncharacteristic restraint." In the real world the rest of us inhabit, Clinton has benefited from over a year of the establishment press downplaying or ignoring his angry responses to challenges and his elitist statements, including his two most recent gaffes: a sneering reference to "coal people" and a claim that the Donald Trump campaign's "Make America Great Again" slogan is racist. The national press's consistent disinterest in reporting his remarks explains how the Times reporter can write what he did with a straight face.

By Clay Waters | August 18, 2016 | 10:12 AM EDT

The New York Times did its part for the Hillary Clinton campaign (and President Obama’s legacy) in Thursday’s edition, offering happy talk about lost coal jobs in Kentucky, skipping over some inconvenient facts that would cloud the pro-Democratic narrative, while another story bashing Donald Trump’s tax plan passed up a golden opportunity to revive Clinton’s infamous “dead broke” comment.

By Alatheia Nielsen | August 3, 2016 | 4:39 PM EDT

​When Democrats unveiled their new party platform at the DNC, it read like the mission statement from Tom Steyer’s NextGen Climate PAC.

The Energy & Environment Legal Institute first identified the similarities in a July 25 report, calling them “policy plagiarism.” The report also called Tom Steyer “the most affluent crony capitalist.”

By Julia A. Seymour | June 14, 2016 | 11:07 AM EDT

President Obama threatened to bankrupt the coal industry before he was elected. Presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton recently told coal miners she would put a lot of them “out of business.” Both statements were clear as crystal. The left wants to eliminate the coal industry. But the network news media have done their best to conceal the issue by ignoring the Obama administration’s role in harming the coal industry and killing jobs.

By Tom Blumer | May 6, 2016 | 11:34 AM EDT

The press is protecting Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton from the true extent of the blowback over her expressed desire to see coal miners lose their jobs and her bogus attempt to "apologize" for what she said.

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, appearing on Fox & Friends Thursday morning, identified a larger truth about Mrs. Clinton's callous disregard for workers and their families — people about whose well-being her party claims to be concerned:

By Kristine Marsh | May 5, 2016 | 9:55 PM EDT

Thursday night on CNN’s Anderson Cooper 360, the host and correspondent Gary Tuchman surprisingly highlighted how poorly Clinton was faring with blue-collar Democrats in West Virginia. Tuchman noted that registered Democrats outnumber Republicans 6 to 1 in the coal mining state, but because of Clinton’s attitude towards the coal industry, many Democrat voters were actually supporting Donald Trump instead of their party’s presumptive nominee.

By Kyle Drennen | May 3, 2016 | 1:07 PM EDT

After 50 days of the network news censoring Hillary Clinton’s stated plan to cripple the coal industry in pursuit of a left-wing climate change agenda, on Tuesday, all three network morning shows finally covered the comments after a laid off West Virginia coal miner confronted the Democratic frontrunner. During an otherwise staged campaign round table discussion on Monday, unemployed coal miner Bo Copley cited Clinton’s comments during a March 13 CNN town hall that “We're going to put a lot of coal miners and coal companies out of business.”

By Mark Finkelstein | May 3, 2016 | 10:24 AM EDT

One of our media bias categories at NewsBusters is Double Standards. There was a classic example of the phenomenon on today's Morning Joe. The show's running theme was relentless mockery and ridicule of Ted Cruz for crossing the street yesterday to calmly debate a group of Trump supporters. 

But later in the show, when a clip was run of Hillary being confronted by a West Virginian over her boast that she would "put a lot of coal miners and coal companies out of business," the panel reverentially praised Clinton, giving her "credit" for her courage in doing so. The panel had the chutzpah to insist that Hillary's moment was "organic" and wasn't staged. Really? She's sitting around a table with a handful of voters. Is Morning Joe asking us to believe that the former coal company worker wasn't hand picked and that Hillary wasn't fully briefed on what to expect? Please. Earlier, Mika Brzezinski actually introduced the Cruz segment by saying it was an example of someone "choking like a dog." The double standard was glaring and outrageous.

By Tom Blumer | April 29, 2016 | 11:16 PM EDT

On Thursday, shortly after the government estimated that the economy only grew at an annual rate of 0.5 percent in this year's first quarter, Jeffry Bartash at Marketwatch.com commented on the especially weak performance in nonresidential business investment.

That category subtracted 0.76 points from GDP, the worst result since the second quarter of 2009, during the recession. Bartash, presumably based on real discussions he's had with real economists wrote: "Many economists doubt business investment will show much strength in 2016. A tepid global economic scene and a tumultuous U.S. presidential election marked by heavy anti-corporate rhetoric appears to have made business executives more cautious." What? "Anti-corporate rhetoric" affects the decisions of entrepreneurs, investors and businesspeople? Who knew?

By Tom Blumer | April 14, 2016 | 1:45 PM EDT

Just three months after Arch, the nation's Number 2 coal mining company, filed for bankruptcy, Number 1, Peabody Energy, has followed suit. Five of the industry's largest firms have now gone bankrupt in the past 12 months.

Two Associated Press stories on Peabody this week managed to avoid mentioning the name of President Barack Obama, whose hostility toward the industry has been obvious since his first presidential campaign, or to directly cite his administration's Environmental Protection Agency as a factor in the firm's trip to bankruptcy court.

By Tom Blumer | March 16, 2016 | 10:19 PM EDT

In a Monday afternoon post which gets close to taking pleasure in the serious economic decline in the heart of the coal mining industry in West Virginia, CNN Money's Patrick Gillespie observed, based on Hillary Clinton's recent remarks about coal miners' jobs, that she "has no love for coal companies."

But in Gillespie's world, what Mrs. Clinton said doesn't matter, because "Clinton won't have much coal to put out of business: the industry is already gutted." Besides, in a complete flight of fancy, the CNN Money reporter appears to believe that the solar industry and its current army of 209,000 workers will pick up the slack. The facts, including the hugely inconvenient truth that solar only accounts for barely 1 percent of the power produced by coal, say otherwise.

By Julia A. Seymour | March 14, 2016 | 7:07 PM EDT

Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton recently admitted her policies would put a certain group of people out of work, which could cost her support if the liberal media reported it.

At a CNN/TV One town hall event in Ohio on March 13, Clinton said, “[W]e’re gonna put a lot of coal miners and coal companies out of business. Right, Tim? And we’re gonna make it clear that we don’t want to forget those people.” She later added that the nation would need to move away from coal and “all” other fossil fuels.