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By Noel Sheppard | June 10, 2011 | 6:22 PM EDT

NPR's Nina Totenberg on Friday may have asked one of the silliest questions raised since the Weinergate sex scandal began about two weeks ago.

Appearing on PBS's "Inside Washington," Totenberg actually said, "If his name weren’t Weiner, would we still be talking about this?" (video follows with transcript and commentary):

By Matthew Sheffield | June 10, 2011 | 5:33 PM EDT

Our friends and colleagues at CNSNews.com are unveiling a new regular feature devoted to showcasing ridiculous government spending projects called the "Golden Hookah Award." We'll be helping to spread the word to help everyone on the web try to get a handle on what our government officials are smoking.

The first recipient of the Golden Hookah is a project funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse which gave hard drugs like PCP, cocaine, heroin and methamphetamines to monkeys and then measured the drugs' effect on them.

Watch the video report below the break. Also see full report by CNSNews.com's Christopher Neefus:

By Matt Hadro | June 10, 2011 | 5:33 PM EDT

Openly-gay CNN anchor Don Lemon badgered GOP presidential candidate Rick Santorum over his views on gay marriage Friday, questioning his stance on gay rights and if he really had any gay friends. A brief clip of the interview that aired on Newsroom Friday afternoon revealed Lemon to be fairly testy in his questions.

Having revealed in May that he is gay, Lemon defended his objectivity as a journalist and dismissed the notion that he would be biased on the gay rights debate. But later he told a pro-gay newspaper "I hope to change minds" as an openly-gay journalist, and that there should be more journalists who come out. NewsBusters has documented Lemon's history of pro-gay bias.

By Geoffrey Dickens | June 10, 2011 | 5:23 PM EDT

It would be unfair to call Jon Stewart a racist but when he mocked GOP presidential contender Herman Cain as essentially an illiterate, on Thursday's show, it has to be asked wouldn't Stewart and his cronies at The Daily Show have satirized any sort of conservative talk show host, like a Rush Limbaugh or Sean Hannity, as a bigot if they had joked that President Barack Obama didn't "like to read?"

After playing a clip of Cain promising to limit congressional bills to just three pages, Stewart attempted to impersonate Cain and then threw up a mock billboard that read: "HERMAN CAIN 2012 - I DON'T LIKE TO READ"

The following excerpt was aired on the June 9 edition of Comedy Central's The Daily Show:

By Tim Graham | June 10, 2011 | 3:03 PM EDT

On Friday morning, the Daily Kos blogger with the byline Seneca Doane tried to have fun with the mass defection away from Newt Gingrich, satirically offering Newt his services in defeating the other GOP candidates. He was especially vicious with Herman Cain: "I'll admit it right up front -- Cain scares me.  I don't mean as an opponent; I mean as a human being." Cain, he says is the perfect racist:

Cain poses a problem, though.  Cain can get away with saying more racist things than you can, because white (i.e., almost all) Republicans think that because he's Black, he can't be racist, even if he's trotting out every vicious anti-Black stereotype in the book to the delight of white onlookers.  (And he will.  You should let people know that he'll be your choice for HUD Secretary.  The more pissed off he gets at it and denies that he'd take the job, the better.  You'll tell him that you know that he wants a job and will give it his all.)

By Clay Waters | June 10, 2011 | 1:44 PM EDT

Who Says Times Journalists Aren’t Religious?

"In my house growing up, The Times substituted for religion. If The Times said it, it was the absolute truth." – Managing editor Jill Abramson as quoted by Times media reporter Jeremy Peters upon her ascension to the executive editor slot, replacing Bill Keller, in a story posted at nytimes.com the morning of June 2. The quote disappeared later that day and did not make it into the next day’s print edition.

David Mamet, Far-Right Playwright

"David Mamet explains his intellectual shift to the right. The far right." – Subhead introducing Andrew Goldman’s May 29 interview with playwright David Mamet in the Times Sunday magazine.

By Nicholas Ballasy | June 10, 2011 | 12:55 PM EDT

Hollywood actress Jennifer Garner applauded President Barack Obama for already committing $500 million to federally funded education programs for "toddlers" but argued that it is "not enough."

By Ken Shepherd | June 10, 2011 | 12:25 PM EDT

"Shouldn't presidential candidates and prospective candidates have a firm grasp of American history?" Chris Matthews rhetorically asked on the June 9 "Hardball" before lamenting that Sarah Palin had a penchant for being "painfully wrong" on the subject, citing her recent inartful explanation of the famed midnight ride of Paul Revere.

Yet it seems Matthews may have no idea why the British regulars were marching on Lexington and Concord in the first place, as the "Hardball" host scoffed yesterday at Palin making an "NRA ad" out of the historical ride.

Video follows page break

By Jill Stanek | June 10, 2011 | 12:13 PM EDT

I really, really like Russell Crowe as an actor.

By Geoffrey Dickens | June 10, 2011 | 11:40 AM EDT

On Thursday's Hardball, Chris Matthews determined that Democratic Congressman Anthony Weiner could be in danger of being forced out of Congress by Blue Dog Dems who face uphill battles in red states because, as he put it, "people in the rural areas of this country who are Christian conservative culturally - you can say backward if you want...don't like this kind of stuff."

(video after the jump)

By Kyle Drennen | June 10, 2011 | 11:00 AM EDT

At the top of Friday's NBC Today, co-host Matt Lauer declared that it "could be a tough day for potential presidential candidate Sarah Palin. We're live in Alaska, where thousands of her e-mails as governor there will be released today." Later, fellow co-host Ann Curry introduced a report on the upcoming release by proclaiming that Palin was "about to face a new political minefield."

Without having seen a single email, national investigative correspondent Michael Isikoff argued that Palin "may now be facing a storm." The headline on screen throughout the segment read: "Problems for Palin? Thousands of E-mails to be Released."

By Noel Sheppard | June 10, 2011 | 10:59 AM EDT

Conservative columnist Ann Coulter had a lively discussion with HLN's Joy Behar Thurday as she discussed her new book "Demonic: How the Liberal Mob Is Endangering America."

After her host claimed the Republican Party has made a saint out of Ronald Reagan, Coulter countered, "Liberals would drink Obama's bathwater" (video follows with transcript and commentary):

By NB Staff | June 10, 2011 | 10:37 AM EDT

"I've never seen the news media do this, and it is beyond reproachful for them to have done this," NewsBusters publisher Brent Bozell complained on the June 10 "Fox & Friends" regarding the New York Times and Washington Post calling for readers to volunteer to help them comb through the archive of Sarah Palin's official gubernatorial e-mail correspondence.

For the full segment, click the play button on the embed below the page break

By Tim Graham | June 10, 2011 | 7:50 AM EDT

The next time someone in the media wants to blame budget cutters for premature deaths, remember James Taranto at The Wall Street Journal, who unveiled another story filed under “Great Moments in Socialized Medicine,” once again from jolly old England and the London Daily Mail:

Peter Thompson, 41, was left in a corridor for ten hours before someone noticed he had passed away. In a final act of indignity, hospital auxiliaries pulled his lifeless body across the floor in a manner his family described as like "dragging a dead animal."

By Tim Graham | June 10, 2011 | 6:45 AM EDT

MSNBC's advertisements for liberalism in its "Lean Forward" campaign aren't just on TV. Near the front of this week's edition of Newsweek is a one-page print ad with a picture of Chris Matthews at a desk. Underneath that image is a hand-written message, white type on black, like a chalkboard. This is the Matthews lecture we get, in all caps: that liberals "advance liberties" and beat conservatives:

Over time, people who advance liberties tend to win the argument, whether it's for women, African Americans, immigrants, or the gay community. In the end, America takes the side of the people looking for rights.