Latest Posts

By Ken Shepherd | | November 30, 2012 | 3:32 PM EST

As I argued yesterday, the Washington Post is already at work with its spin operation to tar Virginia Republican gubernatorial contender Ken Cuccinelli as a right-wing radical in advance of the 2013 race. The spin operation continued apace, today on the front page of the paper's Metro section, where Richmond correspondent Laura Vozzella described for readers how Lt. Gov. Bill Bolling concluded that "the path to GOP nomination looked too steep" to venture.

In her 19-paragraph story November 30 story, Vozzella hailed Bolling as the "state's multi-tasker in chief" who "has been juggling the part-time job of Virginia lieutenant governor with running for governor and working as a private insurance man." But alas, Bolling, "who shares many of [Attorney General Ken] Cuccinelli's conservative views but has a more conciliatory style" was no match for the attorney general's forces, who "pulled off something of a coup" when they "[took] control of the Republican State Central Committee."

By Jeffrey Meyer | | November 30, 2012 | 2:26 PM EST

A week after the staff of Good Morning America joked about the impending closure of Hostess and the loss of 18,000 jobs, the crew at GMA switched to bashing the Hostess executives and sympathizing with the recently laid off employees, ignoring the role unions played in the collapse.  

On Friday’s GMA, co-host Josh Elliott introduced the segment by reporting on new data showing corporate profits have hit an all-time high of $1.75 trillion, then smugly commenting that, “of course not everyone sharing in that wealth.” This led into Elliott bringing in the bankruptcy proceedings at Hostess where he said, “unlike the rank and file, the company's executives are about to score a major payday.”  [See video below page break.  MP3 audio here.] 

By NB Staff | | November 30, 2012 | 12:05 PM EST

Attempts by liberal MSNBC pundits like Touré and Richard Wolffe to dismiss conservative criticisms of Amb. Susan Rice as racially-motivated are evidence of the "militant, radical Left flexing its muscles" post-Obama reelection, NewsBusters publisher Brent Bozell told Sean Hannity on the "Media Mash" segment of the Fox News host's November 29 program.

"Where were" liberal journalists when "Clarence Thomas was smeared in his confirmation hearings" or "with Allen West in Florida?" Bozell asked. "When a conservative black man is attacked," the media are mute, failing to consider if perhaps there is racism at play in the criticisms leveled by liberals. What's more, if Rice were white, the media would simply complain Republican critics are "anti-woman," the Media Research Center founder observed [watch the full segment below the page break].

By Paul Wilson | | November 30, 2012 | 11:16 AM EST

How slanted is media coverage for the gay agenda? Enough that one show’s decision to include a proponent of reparative therapy in a segment on the subject of reparative therapy provoked backlash from the gay community.

The Dr. Oz Show aired a segment on November 28 featuring a debate over the relative merits of reparative therapy. Among the debaters was Julie Hamilton, a representative of NARTH (The National Association for the Research and Therapy of Homosexuality), a group whose mission statement says that it “is a professional, scientific organization that offers hope to those who struggle with unwanted homosexuality.”

By Kyle Drennen | | November 30, 2012 | 10:41 AM EST

In an attempt to dismiss Republican criticism of U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice's misleading September 14 Sunday show statements about Benghazi, on Thursday's MSNBC Andrea Mitchell Reports, Washington Post columnist Ruth Marcus asserted: "I don't think this is really about some comments that were basically right, that she made on Sunday talk shows." [Listen to the audio or watch the video after the jump]

Marcus was prompted to make the declaration after Mitchell tried to paint GOP critics as a combination of sexist and racist: "There have been issues raised as to whether she was being attacked, criticized because she's a woman, because she's African-American....is there a double standard here? Have we had others who've gone on Sunday television talk shows, made mistakes, and not been punished as severely as Susan Rice?"

By Noel Sheppard | | November 30, 2012 | 10:40 AM EST

You know the drill.

By Tom Blumer | | November 30, 2012 | 10:36 AM EST

The annual winter conference of the Democracy Alliance is getting almost no press attention. The alliance "was created to build progressive infrastructure," and promotes a "collaborative giving strategy." Membership is invitation-only. Its board includes Mary Kay Henry, who "serves as International President of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU)." The meeting is in essence a planning session for the funding of "progressive" candidates, their supposedly unrelated Super-PACs, and other causes.

This morning, Matthew Continetti at the Washington Free Beacon called out the press hypocrisy in virtually ignoring this event. A 10 a.m. ET Google News search on "Democracy Alliance" (in quotes) returned only a half-dozen post-Thanksgiving items. Among major outlets, only the Politico, as seen at NJ.com (written by Kenneth Vogel, but not noted there), has given the meeting any attention. Continetti noted that coverage, and the complete lack of any other attention which accompanied it (HT Instapundit; bolds are mine):

By Paul Wilson | | November 30, 2012 | 10:32 AM EST

Shutting down debate, one program at a time.

By Noel Sheppard | | November 30, 2012 | 8:51 AM EST

Before Election Day, Newt Gingrich predicted Mitt Romney would win.

On NBC's Tonight Show Thursday, host Jay Leno asked the former House Speaker if this was because he was "just watching Fox News?" (video follows with transcript and commentary):

By Tim Graham | | November 30, 2012 | 7:50 AM EST

Yesterday, we noted how Howard Kurtz proclaimed that he was pleased to put Tom Ricks, his former Washington Post colleague, on his CNN show Reliable Sources to trash his fellow journalists on the Petraeus scandal. Ricks believed no one should care about the "personal life"  or "lovers' quarrels" of the sex-starved CIA director.

But in rereading this interview, here's what's quite remarkable. In 1400 words of transcript, the two former Posties trade insults about how awful the press behaved in this incident....and neither breathes a word about the biggest dupe in the entire scandal: Washington Post metropolitan editor Vernon Loeb, Paula Broadwell's co-author. Loeb wrote after the scandal broke that he never took the notion of an affair seriously:  "My wife says I'm the most clueless person in America."

By Noel Sheppard | | November 30, 2012 | 1:15 AM EST

Jay Leno continued pressuring Barack Obama Thursday night.

During his opening monologue on NBC's Tonight Show, the host said, "This is very dangerous to the White House if journalists should suddenly start asking real questions” (video follows with transcribed highlights and commentary):

By Tom Blumer | | November 29, 2012 | 11:59 PM EST

Today, the Congressional Budget Office released a report informing readers that extending unemployment benefits for a year, an outlay which would cost the federal government $30 billion, would, because of its allegedly stimulative impact, generate 300,000 jobs.

Even if true, neither the CBO, nor the Associated Press in covering the report, noted that this result works out to a cost $100,000 per job. Bravely assuming that each new job created pays $40,000 per year, that's a $60,000 loss in value received compared to money spent. The government's tax take at all levels on that amount of earnings is likely about $10,000 or so. All of this is apparently considered pretty smart by the AP's Sam Hananel and a quoted leading Democrat:

By Clay Waters | | November 29, 2012 | 9:06 PM EST

The New York Times has aggressively covered lurid scandals involving its perceived ideological opponents, from questioning what Pope Benedict XVI knew about the sex abuse and coverup in the Catholic Church, to the phone-hacking committed in Rupert Murdoch's tabloid empire. But when it comes to a pedophilia scandal and coverup that has been brought into the New York Times Co.'s own backyard, the coverage is muted and tamed.

Mark Thompson, new chief executive for the NYT Co., was director general of the BBC from 2004 until 2011, and was in charge when the decision was made by higherups in 2011 to abandon a 'Newsnight' story investigating accusations of pedophilia against long-time BBC star Jimmy Savile.

By Brent Baker | | November 29, 2012 | 8:56 PM EST

Demonstrating once more how the NBC Nightly News has become the big audience outlet for MSNBC’s left-wing angst, Brian Williams couldn’t even keep such silliness out of what should have been a light-hearted story on Mitt Romney’s lunch with President Obama. ABC and CBS managed to do that.

On NBC, however, reporter Kristen Welker charged “there was an awkward backdrop to this snap shot” of Romney and Obama shaking hands in the Oval Office. She cited “Romney saying President Obama won because he gave gifts to key constituencies” as well as Romney adviser Stuart Stevens daring to suggest Obama “was a charismatic African-American President with a billion dollars, no primary and media that often felt morally conflicted about being critical.”

By Noel Sheppard | | November 29, 2012 | 7:15 PM EST

"It's not just a bad deal. This is really an insulting deal. What Geithner offered, what you showed on the screen, Robert E. Lee was offered easier terms at Appomattox and he lost the Civil War."

So said syndicated Charles Krauthammer on Fox News's Special Report about the budget proposal Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner put on the table Thursday to avoid the looming fiscal cliff.