Larry King Live: Jesse Ventura, Actor D.L.Hughley Call Republicans 'Nazis'

It always comes down to this one, doesn't it? Leftists and fringe politicos calling Republicans "Nazis." Well, the "N" word was once again unleashed against John McCain's Republican Convention on September 2 during CNN's Larry King Live show. Actor D.L. Hughley and Independent former Governor of Minnesota Jesse Ventura both went for that shopworn epithet as King discussed the Convention.

Along with Hughley and Ventura, King had on former Clinton Press Secretary Dee Dee Myers who claimed that Republicans were saying with their convention theme that “only Republicans put their country first” ridiculously saying that Independents shouldn't vote for the GOP because they are insulted so much. "I don't understand why any independent or Democrat would consider voting for the McCain/Palin ticket," Myers partisanly intoned, "after being called all night that only Republicans put their country first."

Only a true sell out, though, would see it that way. Certainly the convention was cheerleading for its own members and saying that Republicans do, indeed, put their country first. But no one was saying that no one else does. Still, isn't this what conventions are for? To cheerlead and buck up the troops? And tell me, Dee Dee, why should anyone outside the Democrat Party go over to their side of the aisle after the Democrats so monotonously claim that only they care about people? Isn't that just as insulting?

Anyway, that partisan foolishness aside, it was left to Hughley and Ventura to get really into stupid by calling Republicans "Nazis."

TRANSCRIPT

KING: ...Jesse, even though you didn't see it, that the theme was "we're the patriots"?

VENTURA: Well, you know, the Republicans have been pushing really Hermann Goering on us, the Nazi, since 2001. I mean, you know...

KING: Hermann Goering?

VENTURA: Yes. He said that it's easy to take a country to war. You have to convince them they're under attack. Denounce the pacifist for being unpatriotic and also for putting the country into danger. And yet, Thomas Jefferson said dissension is the greatest form of patriotism.

I like to follow the teachings of Thomas Jefferson a little bit more than Herman Goering.

HUGHLEY: To follow up on what Jesse was saying, it did remind me -- I promise you, the first thing I thought when I saw those "Country First" signs, it reminded me of Nazis. It really -- I mean they just seemed so, you know -- that seemed to be a country that I don't recognize.

It seemed to be -- it didn't look that way. It looks very exclusionary. It looked very specific. I didn't see anything that looked -- you know everybody looked like they were -- had the same experience, had the same kind of process.

It seemed like that -- I felt more like I was looking -- I mean, peering into something that wasn't necessarily invited to. So I didn't -- I can't see anybody would watch them and think that those people would be, you know, open to anybody with a different experience.

Aside from Hughley's complete inarticulateness it is simply amazing that no one in the media ever questions this obscene, leftist penchant to go calling everyone that they disagree with "Nazis."

What with the Obama campaign trying to shut down a Chicago radio station, his insistence on calling everyone a racist for merely questioning him, and his claims that talk about his "spiritual mentor" the racist Reverend Wright is off limits, it seems to me that the Obama campaign is angling for a tad more fascist shutting down of political free speech than is any Republican.

Naturally, Larry King just smiles and goes with the flow of hate coming from the mouths of fringe politicos like Ventura and leftist actors like Hughley. But, imagine the uproar that would ensue if Larry King had had a conservative activist on the air calling liberals "Nazis." Imagine the hew and cry that would be raised for that?

But when liberals call Republicans "Nazis"... ah the sweet, sweet silence from the media!

(Photo credit: Associated Press)

(H/T NewsBusters reader Jack Jones)