Top HBO TV Producer David Simon Embraces Marx Diagnosis: 'My Country Is a Horror Show'

David Simon, the toast of Hollywood and the cultural elite for creating the inner-city Baltimore crime drama "The Wire" for HBO, unleashed a left-wing jeremiad on the "Two Americas" at a "Festival of Dangerous Ideas" in Sydney, Australia.

He also shocked Baltimore Sun TV critic David Zurawik for admitting people don't really watch his HBO stuff. As his show "Treme" ends on Sunday, he declared, “I don’t know about HBO. They may be getting hip to the fact that nobody watches my [expletive] when it’s on the air. And that’s not likely to change, I don’t think.” The British newspaper The Guardian published his talk in Australia, where he ran down America and talked up Karl Marx as a "diagnostician" of capitalism's ills.

I'm not a Marxist in the sense that I don't think Marxism has a very specific clinical answer to what ails us economically. I think Marx was a much better diagnostician than he was a clinician. He was good at figuring out what was wrong or what could be wrong with capitalism if it wasn't attended to and much less credible when it comes to how you might solve that.

You know if you've read Capital or if you've got the Cliff Notes, you know that his imaginings of how classical Marxism – of how his logic would work when applied – kind of devolve into such nonsense as the withering away of the state and platitudes like that. But he was really sharp about what goes wrong when capital wins unequivocally, when it gets everything it asks for.

That may be the ultimate tragedy of capitalism in our time, that it has achieved its dominance without regard to a social compact, without being connected to any other metric for human progress.

We understand profit. In my country we measure things by profit. We listen to the Wall Street analysts. They tell us what we're supposed to do every quarter. The quarterly report is God. Turn to face God. Turn to face Mecca, you know.

Simon suggested he liked Franklin Roosevelt's America on the way out of World War II, with strong labor unions and Democrats in power and "facile" creation of wealth. But now, in the Obama era the country is a "horror show."

And so in my country you're seeing a horror show. You're seeing a retrenchment in terms of family income, you're seeing the abandonment of basic services, such as public education, functional public education. You're seeing the underclass hunted through an alleged war on dangerous drugs that is in fact merely a war on the poor and has turned us into the most incarcerative state in the history of mankind, in terms of the sheer numbers of people we've put in American prisons and the percentage of Americans we put into prisons. No other country on the face of the Earth jails people at the number and rate that we are.


[T]hat's what The Wire was about basically, it was about people who were worth less and who were no longer necessary, as maybe 10 or 15% of my country is no longer necessary to the operation of the economy. It was about them trying to solve, for lack of a better term, an existential crisis. In their irrelevance, their economic irrelevance, they were nonetheless still on the ground occupying this place called Baltimore and they were going to have to endure somehow.

That's the great horror show. What are we going to do with all these people that we've managed to marginalise? It was kind of interesting when it was only race, when you could do this on the basis of people's racial fears and it was just the black and brown people in American cities who had the higher rates of unemployment and the higher rates of addiction and were marginalised and had the shitty school systems and the lack of opportunity.

And kind of interesting in this last recession to see the economy shrug and start to throw white middle-class people into the same boat, so that they became vulnerable to the drug war, say from methamphetamine, or they became unable to qualify for college loans. And all of a sudden a certain faith in the economic engine and the economic authority of Wall Street and market logic started to fall away from people. And they realised it's not just about race, it's about something even more terrifying. It's about class.

Simon is socialist enough that he thinks capitalism ruined the push for Obamacare: "Right now capital has effectively purchased the government, and you witnessed it again with the healthcare debacle in terms of the $450m that was heaved into Congress, the most broken part of my government, in order that the popular will never actually emerged in any of that legislative process."

Apparently, the "popular will" favored  single-payer Canadian-style banishment of private health insurers.

[HT: Baltimore's own @dangainor]

Tim Graham
Tim Graham
Tim Graham is Executive Editor of NewsBusters and is the Media Research Center’s Director of Media Analysis