Occupy 15th Street: The Washington Post Anti-Business Section

Leftist media critics resent that newspapers have a "Business" section or that PBS used to show "Wall Street Week," as if reporting on business automatically means you're pro-business. The Washington Post on Sunday seemed to be working overtime to publish an Anti-Business section, with two columns endorsing the "Occupy Wall Street" protests, an enormous article by liberal Post wunderkind Ezra Klein on how the Obama "stimulus" was too tiny, and a whole page devoted to the Bloomberg expose of the Koch brothers' shenanigans in Iran.

Steven Pearlstein wrote a column on how "Obama can learn from Wall St. protest." Michelle Singletary's column was titled "Rage, rage against Wall St." and compared the protesters to Rosa Parks fighting racism on the bus.


“This movement at the moment is all about being angry and having rage,” [protest leader Kalle] Lasn said in an interview. “But in the next few weeks, as it is grows, it will become clear it’s a positive program about political and social change.”

Lasn said he hopes the next big protest will happen Oct. 29. The magazine is encouraging people to stage protests in capitals in the United States and cities abroad the weekend before the G-20 summit. The summit, a gathering of finance ministers and central bank governors from the 20 largest economies, is being held Nov. 3-4 in France. Lasn said that one demand protesters can unite behind is a global financial transaction levy dubbed the Robin Hood tax, which is intended to make the financial sector contribute to fixing the economic crisis it helped create.

“We want to get millions marching on Oct. 29,” Lasn said. “This could be the beginning of a whole new global future where we the people call the shots. I just hope it doesn’t align itself with the Democratic Party. I hope it stays aloof from the U.S. two-party system. It should become a real people’s movement.”

Throughout history, great change has evolved from small civil protests.

It took a Rosa Parks, who refused to give up her seat on a public bus to a white man, to inspire the Montgomery bus boycott that eventually resulted in the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that segregation was unconstitutional.

Singletary added: "Are you fed up? If so, you can find local Occupy Wall Street events at www.occupytogether.org, which says it’s the unofficial hub for those who want to take action against corporate greed."

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Tim Graham
Tim Graham
Tim Graham is Executive Editor of NewsBusters and is the Media Research Center’s Director of Media Analysis