CBS Hypes Michelle Obama's Latest 'Fashion Milestone,' Skimps on Health Care Setback

 

The journalists at CBS This Morning on Tuesday hyperventilated over the latest "fashion milestone" for Michelle Obama, donating four minutes to the First Lady's second inaugural dress appearing at the Smithsonian. In contrast, the latest setback for ObamaCare warranted only a minute and 19 seconds.

Co-host Charlie Rose enthused, "First Lady Michelle Obama is marking another fashion milestone. The Smithsonian Institution decided two dresses are better than one." [See video below. MP3 audio here.] Jan Crawford appeared at the American History Museum to update the breaking news that Mrs. Obama's red dress will be on display. Crawford promoted, "Mrs. Obama's shoes also will be on display. But they're a little different than the shoes she wore four years ago."

In contrast, only one minute and 19 seconds were allowed for this revelation by Rose: "New enrollment figures are raising concern for President Obama's health care program. Officials say the numbers confirm that not enough healthy young people are buying insurance."

Journalist Major Garrett explained, "Right now 24 percent [of new ObamaCare participants] are age 18 to 34...This is important because outside experts have said ObamaCare economics only works if about 40 percent of those enrollees are in that category of 18 to 34."

Yet, for a dress, Crawford found time to reminisce about the 2013 inaugural, reminding, "With that introduction last January, the President ended all the suspense. The First Lady was wearing red, a gown created by Jason Wu."

On location at the American History Museum, she marveled, "The red dress will look completely different in this room."

A partial transcript of the January 14 CBS This Morning segment, which aired at 8:07am ET, is below:


CHARLIE ROSE: First Lady Michelle Obama is marking another fashion milestone. The Smithsonian Institution decided two dresses are better than one. Jan Crawford is in Washington at the National Museum of American History. Jan, good morning.

JAN CRAWFORD: Well, good morning, Charlie, Norah and Gayle. So the Smithsonian usually only exhibits the first gown that the First Lady would wear in her first inaugural ball. And of course, this white gown that we all remember Mrs. Obama wore four years ago, that's been on display for the past few years. Starting today, the public will be able to see Mrs. Obama's second inaugural ball gown. And the museum officials believe it's going to be a big draw in what is the museum more popular exhibits.

BARACK OBAMA: Ladies and gentlemen, my better half and my dance partner, Michelle Obama.

CRAWFORD: With that introduction last January, the President ended all the suspense. The First Lady was wearing red, a gown created by Jason Wu, the same young designer she chose four years earlier for her husband's first inauguration. After that big reveal, Wu talked with CBS This Morning.

...

CRAWFORD: Now, Mrs. Obama's shoes also will be on display. But they're a little different than the shoes she wore four years ago, they're by the same designer, Jimmy Chu and they obviously match the red dress. But the big difference is the heel. They're about half as tall as the one she wore in the first inaugural ball. So, kind of makes you think after standing around and dancing around four years ago, she decided to go with something more practical than the first time around. Charlie, Norah, Gayle?

Makes sense to me. If they could come up with a pretty clog, I think women everywhere would be happy.

ROSE: In shoes.

KING: I know that's a rule change for now. hope they make that permanent. I think that's a nice thing. We love looking at the dresses.

NORAH O'DONNELL: Absolutely. That's lovely. And Any time people can visit the Smithsonian and learn about presidential history is a plus.

ROSE: She must be easy to design for, she's tall and slim and elegant.

Scott Whitlock
Scott Whitlock
Scott Whitlock is the senior news analyst for the Media Research Center and a contributing editor for NewsBusters.org