ABC's Yunji de Nies Gushes Over 'Cinderella Story' of Michelle Obama

"Good Morning America" reporter Yunji de Nies continued to fawn over Michelle Obama on Friday, lauding how the First Lady shared her "Cinderella story" with a girls school in London. An ABC graphic for the segment opined, "Michelle Wows Europe: First Trip Big Hit." Recounting the positive reception the speech received, de Nies cooed, "But it was her personal touch that made the biggest impact."

Tina Brown, liberal commentator and former editor of the New Yorker, was featured to rhapsodize, "I don't see any misstep from Michelle Obama on this trip. She really excited everybody. She's done it right." Of course, de Nies made no mention of Brown's left wing political views. Sounding more like a PR representative, the GMA correspondent asserted, "She [Michelle Obama] leaves the U.K., no longer a stranger, but, now, a friend."

De Nies has provided celebratory coverage throughout the Obamas' trip to the G-20 summit. On Thursday, she informed viewers, "Mrs. Obama hasn't lost touch with her sensible chic American roots."

A transcript of the April 3 segment, which aired at 7:03am, follows:

DIANE SAWYER: Okay, thank you, Jake. And, of course, while everyone is waiting and watching in France for that, that encounter with Mrs. Sarkozy, just take a look again at the photo left behind in England, because everyone is still talking about. The extraordinary gesture, where Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth put her arm around the back of Michelle Obama. You never see that happen. And Mrs. Obama did the same. Buckingham Palace released a statement saying it was "a mutual and spontaneous display of affection between the two women," affection that appears to be shared with all of Europe. And ABC's Yunji de Nies has more.

ABC GRAPHIC: Michelle Wows Europe: First Trip Big Hit

YUNJI DE NIES: In a country that prides itself on keeping a stiff upper lip, Michelle Obama dared to show a little emotion when she spoke at a London girls school.

MICHELLE OBAMA: All of you are jewels. You are precious and you touch my heart. And it is important for the world to know that there are wonderful girls like you all over the world.

DE NIES: The First Lady shared her own Cinderella story that took her from the south side of Chicago all the way to the White House.

OBAMA: I want you to know that we have very much in common. For nothing in my life's path would have predicted that I would be standing here as the first African-American First Lady of the United States of America.

DE NIES: Part of her agenda as First Lady is to empower young women around the world to get an education.

OBAMA: I loved getting A's. I liked being smart.

DE NIES: But it was her personal touch that made the biggest impact. The girls rushed the stage and were left wanting more.

GIRL #1: Very beautiful.

Girl #2: Loved her dress. I really want that dress. It was really nice.

DE NIES: She leaves the U.K., no longer a stranger, but, now, a friend.

TINA BROWN (British political commentator): I don't see any misstep from Michelle Obama on this trip. She really excited everybody. She's done it right.

DE NIES: And the First Lady picked up a bit of a nickname in the U.K. They're calling her "Mighty Michelle." Here in France, the comparisons between Mrs. Sarkozy and Mrs. Obama have already started. The glam-off has begun. Chris?

CUOMO: The glam-off. Yunji, thank you for that.

Scott Whitlock
Scott Whitlock
Scott Whitlock is the senior news analyst for the Media Research Center and a contributing editor for NewsBusters.org