San Diego Bans ‘Biased' Phrase ‘Founding Fathers’; Media Ignore

The city of San Diego in California recently released an eighty-one page manual for city employees with a section forbidding “gender biased” language. Just in time for President's Day, one of these offensive, gendered phrases was none other than “Founding Fathers.” 

The story was covered by conservative media and briefly by Fox Business but the other two cable networks CNN and MSNBC completely ignored the story.

Other banned words in the manual's "Bias-Free Language" section included "mankind" "manpower" and "gentleman's agreement." The manual then went on to describe the politically correct ways to describe disabilities, race and sexual orientation. 

Pacific Justice Institute (“PJI”), a conservative legal watchdog located in Sacramento, California, responded to the city’s unconstitutional ban on freedom of speech by sending a letter demanding they rescind this clear infraction on the 1st Amendment, Fox News.com reported February 10.

“At a time set aside to honor American icons to whom we owe our constitutional freedoms, it is offensive and indefensible that the City of San Diego is directing employees not to even mention the Founding Fathers,” Dacus told FoxNews.com.

After just a few days, the city of San Diego responded by backing off of the language ban, assuring that no employees would be punished for using the phrase.

On FBN’s Lou Dobbs Tonight February 10, the host and his guest Andy Levy (Red Eye) noted the story from “the PC police.” 

​Brad Dacus, President of PJI released this statement:

“We are glad to see the City of San Diego revoke this type of censorship and PC insanity.  At a time set aside to honor American icons to whom we owe our constitutional freedoms, it is offensive and indefensible that the City of San Diego had directed its employees not to even mention the term 'Founding Fathers.' You can be assured that we'll continue to monitor the City to ensure that such censorship does not continue.”

Kristine Marsh
Kristine Marsh
Kristine Marsh is an analyst for the Media Research Center's News Analysis Division.