Robert Redford on CNN: Some Republicans Wanted to 'Destroy' Obama

CNN gave liberal actor Robert Redford a podium to bash Republicans with on Wednesday's New Day. Redford accused some Republicans of wanting to "destroy" President Obama.

"I think that no matter what you would propose they would go against it because their determination was to destroy this person," Redford said of the "minority faction" in Washington versus President Obama.

"Well, I think whatever idea I would have had to make things work just wouldn't have been accepted by this minority faction," Redford responded when asked by CNN's Nischelle Turner for his "advice" for Democrats and Republicans to work together. "They wanted, if it meant destroying the government, anything to keep him [Obama] from succeeding."

And Redford blamed race, in part, for Republican opposition to Obama. "In part one of our conversation, Robert Redford told me that he believes the ongoing battle in Washington is partially precipitated by race. That's his opinion," Turner introduced the segment near the end of the 8 a.m. ET hour of New Day.

He also compared his new movie about one man's struggle for survival to President Obama's battle against the GOP.

"Robert Redford's new film 'All Is Lost' takes you on one man's harrowing journey of survival, his fight to overcome against all odds. A fight he likened to the ongoing battle in Washington and President Obama's contentious relationship with some Republicans," reported Turner.

Below is a partial transcript of the segment, which aired on New Day on October 16 at 8:53 a.m. EDT:

[8:53]

NISCHELLE TURNER: In part one of our conversation, Robert Redford told me that he believes the ongoing battle in Washington is partially precipitated by race. That's his opinion. The question now, how does the country move forward?

(Video Clip)

TURNER (voice over): Robert Redford's new film "All Is Lost" takes you on one man's harrowing journey of survival, his fight to overcome against all odds. A fight he likened to the ongoing battle in Washington and President Obama's contentious relationship with some Republicans.

(on camera): But we still have a government to run. You know he still has to lead a nation. You work with big crews, people that you may not love or that you may not get along with, how do you do it? What would be your advice? How do they start talking and get something done together, even if you don't like each other?

ROBERT REDFORD, actor: Well, I think whatever idea I would have had to make things work just wouldn't have been accepted by this minority faction. I think that no matter what you would propose they would go against it because their determination was to destroy this person. They wanted, if it meant destroying the government, anything to keep him from succeeding. Okay – 
 

Matt Hadro
Matt Hadro
Matt Hadro was a News Analyst for the Media Research Center's News Analysis Division from 2010 through early 2014