Artur Davis Schools CNN: 'Easy' 'to Do What You Guys Are Doing'

CNN's Gloria Borger challenged former congressman Artur Davis' "incredible 180-degree shift" from the Democratic Party to GOP convention speaker, but the GOP's new addition had an answer ready and waiting on Tuesday night.

"Well, Gloria, I'll be honest with you, the easy thing would have been for me to frankly to do what you guys are doing and to be a pundit. The easy thing for me, and no offense for what you do, but the easy thing would be to do a 'plague on both your houses'," Davis retorted.

"[Y]ou were here tonight because you are talking to the swing voters," noted Borger before adding "so how do you make the case, I mean, why, why do that? Why have such an incredible 180-degree shift?"

Davis' response took a hammer to CNN's sanctimonious pleas for bipartisanship and compromise dressed in liberal clothing.

"It's very easy in Washington, D.C. to do the 'plague on both your houses' game, 'oh if both sides would only work together in a bipartisan way'. And for a period of time perhaps I seemed to do that, but I came to the conclusion that on all of the issues that we are debating as a country right now, my views line up with the people who are down here and not with the folks next week in Charlotte," Davis responded.

He also smacked down CNN contributor Roland Martin's attack that he "made no attempt" to discuss the health care bill with President Obama before voting against it.

"Well, and you've overestimated my influence a great deal," Davis quipped.

A transcript of the segment, which aired on August 28 during CNN's coverage of the Republican National Convention at 11:22 p.m. EDT, is as follows:

ARTUR DAVIS: It is not just enough for Republicans to beat up on Barack Obama. The American people like Barack Obama for the most part. Except for the hard core base of our party, the American people like him.

GLORIA BORGER: But those are the people who are eventually nominated Mitt Romney. And those are the Tea Party people --

DAVIS: But they're not the swing voters in this race.

BORGER: But you were talking – you were here tonight because you are talking to the swing voters. I mean, you are talking –

DAVIS: I tried to make the case to them tonight.

BORGER: You're – you're – you're – so how do you make the case, I mean, why, why do that? Why have such an incredible 180-degree shift?

(Crosstalk)

DAVIS: Well, Gloria, I'll be honest with you, the easy thing would have been for me to frankly to do what you guys are doing and to be a pundit. The easy thing for me, and no offense for what you do, but the easy thing would be to do a "plague on both your houses."

(Crosstalk)

DAVIS: Here's what I mean when I say that. It's very easy in Washington, D.C. to do the "plague on both your houses" game, "oh if both sides would only work together in a bipartisan way." And for a period of time perhaps I seemed to do that, but I came to the conclusion that on all of the issues that we are debating as a country right now, my views line up with the people who are down here and not with the folks next week in Charlotte.

(Crosstalk)

BORGER: But you gave a bipartisan speech – you gave a speech trying to appeal to independents.
 
DAVIS: Well, there is no question about that. I think that is a good thing, but you know what I am talking about.

ROLAND MARTIN: I'm still trying to understand, John. When you talked about health care, when you were a congressman, you made no attempt to talk to the President about your concerns regarding the health care bill.

DAVIS: Well, and you've overestimated my influence a great deal.
 

Matt Hadro
Matt Hadro
Matt Hadro was a News Analyst for the Media Research Center's News Analysis Division from 2010 through early 2014