CNN's Roberts Questions Palin's Commitment to Alaska But Talked Up Hillary in 2003

John Roberts, CNN Newsroom | NewsBusters.orgSenator Kay Bailey Hutchinson appeared on CNN's "Newsroom" on Friday to discuss the selection of Governor Sarah Palin as Senator John McCain's vice presidential running. During her interview, "American Morning" co-host John King played a clip of Palin from Glenn Beck's Headline News show from June in which Palin said that she would not accept an offer to be McCain's running mate because she felt she could help Alaska contribute more to America. Roberts then questioned Palin's commitment to her state:
So even back then, you know, speculation wise that she might be chosen as the running mate but she seemed very dedicated to the state of Alaska. The fact that she's leaving it behind after just two years in office, what does that say about her commitment to politics at least on the state level?
However, during his time as Chief White House Correspondent for CBS, Roberts talked up Senator Hillary Clinton as a potential candidate for president in the 2004 election. Roberts filed reports on the possibility of her candidacy on the November 2, 2003, "Evening News" and again on the November 3, 2003, "Early Show," just halfway into her first term as a Senator from New York, and while he did refer to Clinton as "polarizing," he never questioned her commitment to New York:
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The relevant portion of the transcript from the August 29 segment follows:
10:43 a.m.
JOHN ROBERTS: Senator, let's take a moment to listen to the governor herself. She was on the Glenn Beck program back in June. Let's listen to what she has to say here with Glenn and then we'll get you to comment on it.
GLENN BECK: Would you go to that den of vipers in Washington if you were asked?

GOVERNOR SARAH PALIN: You know, if I had to make such a decision today, it would be no. There is a lot that Alaska could be, should be doing to contribute more to the U.S., and I think that I can help do that as governor of the state staying here.
ROBERTS: So even back then, you know, speculation wise that she might be chosen as the running mate but she seemed very dedicated to the state of Alaska. The fact that she's leaving it behind after just two years in office, what does that say about her commitment to politics at least on the state level?