CBS ‘Early Show’ Celebrates Obama One-Month Anniversary

Maggie Rodriguez, CBS In commemoration of the one-month anniversary of the Obama family moving into the White House, on Tuesday’s CBS Early Show, co-host Maggie Rodriguez declared: "For the last month, as President Obama has settled into running the country, the first family has settled into life at the White House. While President Obama has been trying to repair our failing economy, First Lady Michelle Obama has become his number one advocate. Visiting five federal agencies this month, plugging her husband's economic stimulus plan."

Rodriguez went on to describe the Obamas hitting the Washington D.C. social scene: "In one month, the Obamas have engaged in their community, reading to school kids and visiting community organizations...They've become part of the local scene, eating out and attending a performance at the Kennedy Center. They're familiarizing themselves with their new home...They just hosted their first black-tie dinner and have entertained nearly 200 school children at the White House. But above all, in five weeks, Mr. and Mrs. Obama have learned their role as parents-in-chief to daughters Malia and Sasha."

Rodriguez asked former Hillary Clinton social secretary Capricia Marshall about the First Family’s first month: "How do you think they're doing in their first month? They seem to be handling things well. All the balls in the air." Marshall responded: "They are handling things spectacularly. It has been a whirlwind of a first month for this new first family. And America, I think, is thrilled in the way that they have embraced this new challenge and have started this new administration."

Rodriguez went on to ask: "They really have said that they're trying to make this the people's White House. They opened it up for a tour. They brought the students -- the culinary students into the kitchen the other day. Are they really trying to make it different than ever before?" Marshall agreed: "Well, I think that they're doing -- setting the right tone. They are making sure that the White House is the people's house. And it's wonderful to see that, opening it up to so many different types of people, so many different types of events. I was thrilled with the Lilly Ledbetter event. That was really amazing for women across the country."

Marshall was greatly impressed by Michelle Obama’s party planning skills: "But they've got lots planned coming up in the next few weeks. But last Sunday's Governors' Ball was pretty extraordinary. They only had three weeks to put that together." Rodriguez agreed: "Yeah, it's amazing."

Here is the full transcript of the segment:

7:33AM TEASE:

MAGGIE RODRIGUEZ: Well, I am here because, of course, the President will be addressing the nation in prime time this morning. We have been previewing the speech all morning. Also because it marks the first month for the first family. We're going to tell you ahead what the Obamas have been up to.

7:35AM SEGMENT:

MAGGIE RODRIGUEZ: For the last month, as President Obama has settled into running the country, the first family has settled into life at the White House. While President Obama has been trying to repair our failing economy, First Lady Michelle Obama has become his number one advocate. Visiting five federal agencies this month, plugging her husband's economic stimulus plan.

MICHELLE OBAMA: You will also help carry out the business of getting our economy moving again as well.

RODRIGUEZ: In one month, the Obamas have engaged in their community, reading to school kids and visiting community organizations.

OBAMA: D.C. Is our community now. It's our home.

RODRIGUEZ: They've become part of the local scene, eating out and attending a performance at the Kennedy Center. They're familiarizing themselves with their new home.

OBAMA: The White House is -- it's beautiful. It is awe-inspiring. It is what I felt walking through there was that it is a great gift and an honor to be able to live here.

RODRIGUEZ: They just hosted their first black-tie dinner and have entertained nearly 200 school children at the White House. But above all, in five weeks, Mr. and Mrs. Obama have learned their role as parents-in-chief to daughters Malia and Sasha.

OBAMA: And there isn't a day that goes by, particularly after having kids, that I don't wonder or worry about whether I'm doing the right thing for myself, for my family, for my girls.

RODRIGUEZ: Making sure the girls do their chores, homework, and eat their greens.

OBAMA: Sasha still didn't like it. So they have some interesting challenges just meeting the taste issues of a 7 and a 10-year-old.

SANDY MATTHEWS [MICHELLE OBAMA FRIEND]: I think she's done a wonderful job in keeping the girls really, really, really focused and just a sense of normalcy, you know, in their lives.

BARACK OBAMA: If at the end of four years, just from a personal standpoint, we can say they are who they are, they remain the great joys that they are and this hasn't, you know, created a whole bunch of problems for them, then I think we're going to feel pretty good.

RODRIGUEZ: We are joined now by Capricia Marshall, who served as Hillary Clinton's social secretary. Capricia, good morning.

CAPRICIA MARSHALL: Good morning.

RODRIGUEZ: How do you think they're doing in their first month? They seem to be handling things well. All the balls in the air.

MARSHALL: They are handling things spectacularly. It has been a whirlwind of a first month for this new first family. And America, I think, is thrilled in the way that they have embraced this new challenge and have started this new administration.

RODRIGUEZ: They really have said that they're trying to make this the people's White House. They opened it up for a tour. They brought the students -- the culinary students into the kitchen the other day. Are they really trying to make it different than ever before?

MARSHALL: Well, I think that they're doing -- setting the right tone. They are making sure that the White House is the people's house. And it's wonderful to see that, opening it up to so many different types of people, so many different types of events. I was thrilled with the Lilly Ledbetter event. That was really amazing for women across the country. And in addition to that, there are so many other events that they are planning to host in the future. I understand, through talking to their social secretary, Desiree Rogers, they have hosted over 20 events in a short, short period of time.

RODRIGUEZ: How does it work? In the morning, do they get a paper and say -- did you give a paper -- you know, did you give a paper to Hillary Clinton and say, 'here's everything you're doing today'? And how long do you have a schedule for?

MARSHALL: That's about it. You sit down at a scheduling meeting with both the president's office and with the First Lady. And you decide, what are we going to tackle in the next couple of weeks? And they really didn't have a lot of planning time. We have to remember that. I mean, they really sort of jumped into the moment, jumped into the day and just started going. And that was pretty extraordinary. But they've got lots planned coming up in the next few weeks. But last Sunday's Governors' Ball was pretty extraordinary. They only had three weeks to put that together.

RODRIGUEZ: Yeah, it's amazing. So, for example, with the First Lady, are there a whole team of people that plan out every aspect of every event? Does she have hair people, makeup people, wardrobe people, people who think of what she should say? Is it a whole staff that does this?

MARSHALL: Well, there are -- there's lots of help in the White House. But to that extent, not really. But it all comes from her. I mean, she will determine what is going to be the tone. 'What is -- what are we going to tackle? What issues am I going to try to embrace? What events are we going to put before the American people? What do we want to do?' And from there, then, the staff takes on, and they, you know, set forth with their duties, speech-writing, and event planning, and all that goes into it.

RODRIGUEZ: Wow. What a job. Capricia Marshall, thank you so much.

MARSHALL: Oh, thank you.

Kyle Drennen
Kyle Drennen
Kyle Drennen is a News Analyst for MRC