CBS Poll: 71% of Americans ‘Optimistic’ After Obama Win

Poll Numbers, CBS At the top of Tuesday’s CBS Early Show, co-host Julie Chen declared: "Breaking news. A new CBS poll out this morning shows the change in mood in America after Barack Obama's election." Co-host Maggie Rodriguez later touted the poll results: "A changing of the guard in Washington is changing American attitudes. A CBS News poll out this morning shows that most Americans have good feelings about Barack Obama. 71% say they're optimistic about the next four years with him as president."

Compare those poll results with those reported on the CBS Evening News on December 17, 2000 by then-anchor John Roberts, shortly after George W. Bush was elected: "A new CBS News poll out tonight shows that the majority of Americans are satisfied with the outcome of the election, though there were only five points separating them from those who weren't. When asked if Bush legitimately won the election, 53 percent said yes, compared to 40 percent who said no." Roberts also looked at one of President Bush’s first policy proposals: "A narrow majority of Americans also believe that Bush has enough public support to pass is $ 1.3 trillion tax cut...But on Capitol Hill, opinions run from lukewarm to dead set against it."

Here is the full transcript of the Tuesday segment:

7:00AM TEASE:

JULIE CHEN: Breaking news. A new CBS poll out this morning shows the change in mood in America after Barack Obama's election. We'll show you the poll and tell you what he talked about in his meeting with George Bush yesterday.

7:02 AM SEGMENT:

MAGGIE RODRIGUEZ: But first, a changing of the guard in Washington is changing American attitudes. A CBS News poll out this morning shows that most Americans have good feelings about Barack Obama. 71% say they're optimistic about the next four years with him as president. A key step in the transition of power was his meeting yesterday with President Bush at the White House. CBS News chief White House correspondent Chip Reid joins us this morning. Good morning, Chip.

CHIP REID: Well, good morning, Maggie. You know, during the campaign, Barack Obama had some rather unkind things to say about President Bush. For example, accusing him of driving the economy into a ditch. But yesterday, at the White House, both men made an effort to put politics aside. It was all smiles and graciousness at the Bushes welcomed President-elect Obama and wife Michelle to the White House. While the women toured the Obamas future home, the men walked down the colonnade to the West Wing, where they posed for cameras before going into the Oval Office to meeting. Among the topics they discussed, a rescue plan for the auto industry. Obama feels the 25 billion already in the pipeline is not enough and an economic stimulus package now, before he takes office. No advisers were present and neither man commented publicly afterward.

DANA PERINO: It's just very private and I'm sure that it -- this won't be the only time they speak.

REID: A conciliatory meeting of the president and the president-elect is a tradition that goes back decades. In 1980, President Carter welcomed Ronald Reagan after a bitter campaign, and in 2000, President Clinton, by all appearances, gave a gracious welcome to President-elect George W. Bush soon after the divisive Florida recount. Now with the nation both at war and in a severe economic downturn, both men have said it's essential this transition be as smooth as possible. After exploring the White House, from the Lincoln Bedroom, to the library, to the movie theater, Mrs. Bush and Mrs. Obama discussed what it will be like raising two young daughters, 10-year-old Malia and 7-year-old Sasha, in the White House.

BONNIE ANGELO: The fact that they're sisters and they can have each other, I think, will be very important. I think these two little girls are going to have such fun exploring the White House, the hidden staircase.

REID: Michelle Obama also spent part of her day visiting exclusive private schools, where the children of Washington's movers and shakers attend. And as I mentioned, President-elect Obama pushed for more aid for the auto industry, while the Bush Administration has resisted that, and they didn't just talk about GM, which is getting all the headlines right now. They talked about concerns in the auto industry across the board. Maggie.

RODRIGUEZ: CBS's Chip Reid in Washington, thank you, Chip.

Kyle Drennen
Kyle Drennen
Kyle Drennen is a News Analyst for MRC