Global Warming Summit in Cancun Opens with Prayer to Pagan Goddess Ixchel

During a congressional hearing in March 2009, manmade global warming skeptic Rep. John Shimkus (R-Ill.) referred to God's promise in the the book of Genesis to never again flood the entire Earth as one reason why he is dismissive of global warming alarmists.

"The earth will end only when God declares its time to be over. Man will not destroy this earth. This earth will not be destroyed by a flood," Shimkus insisted, after quoting from Genesis 8:22.

Ever since then, the media have gone back from time to time to scoff at Shimkus's statement, citing his religious beliefs as reason he should not considered credible when it comes to challenging climate change science.

But if the media think that's fair game, shouldn't they apply the same standard to religious language employed by climate change alarmists like Christiana Figueres?

After all, the executive secretary of the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change literally offered up a prayer to a pagan moon goddess on Monday during her opening statement at a UN climate conference convened in Cancun, Mexico.

Here's how Washington Post reporter Juliet Eilperin reported the story at the paper's Post Carbon blog on Monday, November 29 (emphasis mine):


With United Nations climate negotiators facing an uphill battle to advance their goal of reducing emissions linked to global warming, it's no surprise that the woman steering the talks appealed to a Mayan goddess Monday.

 

Christiana Figueres, executive secretary of the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change, invoked the ancient jaguar goddess Ixchel in her opening statement to delegates gathered in Cancun, Mexico, noting that Ixchel was not only goddess of the moon, but also "the goddess of reason, creativity and weaving. May she inspire you -- because today, you are gathered in Cancun to weave together the elements of a solid response to climate change, using both reason and creativity as your tools."

 

She called for "a balanced outcome" which would marry financial and emissions commitments from industrialized countries aimed at combating climate change with "the understanding of fairness that will guide long-term mitigation efforts."

 

"Excellencies, the goddess Ixchel would probably tell you that a tapestry is the result of the skilful interlacing of many threads," said Figueres, who hails from Costa Rica and started her greetings in Spanish before switching to English. "I am convinced that 20 years from now, we will admire the policy tapestry that you have woven together and think back fondly to Cancun and the inspiration of Ixchel."

Of course, that little vignette was NOT republished in the print edition of Tuesday's Post.

What's more, a search for "Ixchel" in Nexis turned up zero mentions among both major newspapers and the broadcast networks.

Image of Ixchel via http://home.birthwisdom.org/mayan-goddess-ixchel/

Ken Shepherd
Ken Shepherd
Ken Shepherd is the Managing Editor for NewsBusters