Couric's Notebook Nag: Don't Let Cereal Cartoons Parent Your Kids

<div style="float: right"><embed src="http://cnettv.cnet.com/av/video/cbsnews/atlantis2/player-dest.swf" flashvars="linkUrl=http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=5464653n&amp;releaseURL=http://cn... allowfullscreen="true" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" pluginspage="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer" width="212" height="162"></embed><br /></div>Perhaps hopped up on the nutritious goodness of <a href="http://www2.kelloggs.com/Product/ProductDetail.aspx?product=579" target="_blank">Mueslix</a>, CBS &quot;Evening News&quot; anchor Katie Couric took to her <a href="http://www.cbsnews.com/blogs/2009/11/02/couricandco/entry5495342.shtml?t... target="_blank">Notebook vlog on Friday</a> to nag parents about the need to keep their kids away from the siren song of sugary cereals (transcript hers):<blockquote><p>Froot Loops, Cookie Crisp, Reese's Puffs - I almost got a cavity just reading that. Yet, they're the kinds of sugary cereals children beg for at the grocery store. <br /><br />The boxes and T-V ads usually have a colorful cartoon character on them. But, one group of researchers is not amused. <br /><!--break--><br />The Rudd Center for Food Policy &amp; Obesity at Yale University reports that cereal companies spend more than $156 million a year on ads geared for kids. <br /><br />At a time when 12 percent of U.S. children from ages 2 to 5 are considered obese - along with 17 percent of kids 6 to 11 - this problem is anything but sweet. <br /><br />All parents have been there in that grocery aisle - having to decide between what the kids want and what you know is better for them. <br /><br />But maybe some oatmeal for your Little Miss Sweet Tooth can help her avoid big health issues in the future. <br /><br />Don't let a bunny or a tucan take over your parenting role. Tell them you are coo coo for good nutrition, not for Cocoa Puffs.  </p><p>That's a page from my notebook. <br /> <br />I'm Katie Couric, CBS News.  </p></blockquote><p>Of course since fewer Americans these days trust the likes of Couric or other network anchors for their news gathering, it's probably coo-coo for Katie to think they care for her lectures on parenting. </p>

Ken Shepherd
Ken Shepherd
Ken Shepherd is the Managing Editor for NewsBusters