CBS's Julie Chen Endorses Leonardo DiCaprio's Alarmist Film

Julie Chen followed Barbara Walters’ lead in endorsing a global warming alarmist film, this time on Leonardo DiCaprio’s upcoming documentary, "The 11th Hour." The August 13 edition of "The Early Show" ran an unchallenged piece on DiCaprio’s film, then this exchange between co-hosts Harry Smith and Julie Chen.

CHEN: He has also turned his official website into an eco-site. News about his latest movies is posted side by side, with updates from the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation. And to see how you can help protect the environment, log on to our website at CBSNews.com.

HARRY SMITH: And what was your impression?

CHEN: Oh he was very sweet, and--oh of him or the movie? Gotta go green.

SMITH: Yeah, he's such a smart guy.

CHEN: He is a smart guy and he's such a great spokesperson to have for this very important cause.

After the obligatory hat tip to Al Gore, Chen then featured Kenny Ausubel, whom CBS identified as the "founder" of "Bioneers." They failed to disclose that Ausubel is a left wing activist. On one of his many Huffington Post articles, "Mighty Corporate," Ausubel implied American corporate culture was the driving force behind the Iraq invasion, claimed corporations are not taxed enough (he seems to forget corporate taxes are passed on to the consumer) and made this snarky comment about Americans for Tax Reform President Grover Norquist.

"He’s got a really serious issue about taxes, especially on the rich."

Julie Chen then noted "DiCaprio began campaigning for environmental causes shortly after ‘Titanic’ made him one of the most popular stars on the planet."

Maybe if the Titanic burned more coal, that fatal iceberg would have melted. The entire transcript, minus an irrelevant movie promotion, is below.

JULIE CHEN: Leonardo DiCaprio is a Hollywood A-lister, but he's also very passionate about the environment. He provides the star power for a new documentary "The 11th Hour," which warns that humanity and nature are on a crash course that could lead to disaster.

LEONARDO DICAPRIO: Deforestation, soil erosion, vanishing wetlands, and a whole host of other problems have continued unabated. We face a convergence of crises.

CHEN: From hurricanes to record rainfall, global warming, to species extinction, producer and narrator Leo DiCaprio explores the precarious state of the earth's ecosystems. What does the title mean, "The 11th Hour"?

DICAPRIO: It basically means this is the last moment where we can implement a lot of these changes as far as green technology is concerned and this film deals with the fact that this is up to our generation.

FORMER VICE PRESIDENT AL GORE: And so, as the surrounding water gets warmer, it speeds up the melting of the ice.

CHEN: Determined to continue their environmental wakeup call ignited by Al Gore, DiCaprio searched out experts from around the world including Kenny Ausubel. Their message is clear and foreboding: Time to go green is now.

KENNY AUSUBEL, FOUNDER BIONEERS: Hurricane Katrina was the first urban extinction. You know, this is just the beginning of the trend: masses of ecological refugees, mega droughts, mega floods, extremes of all sorts.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Global warming is real, and it's destructive, and its impacts defy the imagination. And humans have not figured out how to change their ways.

CHEN: You've taken personal action. Tell me what are some of the changes you've made in your day to day life.

DICAPRIO: I try to live a "green lifestyle," quote/unquote. I mean, I've, I've done the things that I can do in my house to make it, my house green, energy efficient appliances. I drive a hybrid car. I have solar panels.

CHEN: Where did this passion come from?

DICAPRIO: Really from, media, you know, from watching documentaries at such a young age, from, from seeing films on rainforests in Brazil, and, and really appreciating the beauty of our planet. And I am learning more and more about human impact and wanted to do something about it. I'm the king of the world!

CHEN: DiCaprio began campaigning for environmental causes shortly after "Titanic" made him one of the most popular stars on the planet. Is it hard for you to believe that it's been a decade since Titanic?

DICAPRIO: Yeah, sure, time does fly by pretty fast absolutely. It doesn't seem that long ago.

KATE WINSLET: I'm flying!

[...]

CHEN: He has also turned his official website into an eco-site. News about his latest movies is posted side by side, with updates from the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation. And to see how you can help protect the environment, log on to our website at CBSNews.com.

HARRY SMITH: And what was your impression?

CHEN: Oh he was very sweet, and--oh of him or the movie? Gotta go green.

SMITH: Yeah, he's such a smart guy.

CHEN: He is a smart guy and he's such a great spokesperson to have for this very important cause.